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Stoppingas

Stoppingas

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The Stoppingas was a tribe or clan of Anglo-Saxon England. Their domain was Wootton Wawen and the valley of the River Alne in modern-day Warwickshire.[1] The name of the tribe may have come from the personal name Stoppa, who could have been the tribe's founder or leader, or earliest common ancestor.[2]

The Stoppingas formed part of the Saxon kingdom of the Hwicce, which was later conquered and absorbed by the kingdom of Mercia.[3]

In the mid eighth century Æthelbald of Mercia gave a grant of land in the region of the Stoppingas to Æthelric, the son of King Oshere of the Hwicce, for the purpose of establishing a Minster in the territory. Such an institution was subsequently built at Wootton Wawen, and the later parochia of this minster probably represents the extent territory of the Stoppingas.[4]

References

  1. ^ Hooke 2005, p. 163
  2. ^ Yorke 1995, p. 42
  3. ^ Kirby 2000, p. 9
  4. ^ Hines 2003, p. 34

Bibliography

  • Hines, John (2003), The Anglo-Saxons from the Migration Period to the Eighth Century: An Ethnographic Perspective, Boydell Press, ISBN 1-84383-034-5, retrieved 2009-06-12
  • Hooke, Della (2005), "Mercia: Landscape and Environment", in Brown, Michelle P.; Farr, Carol Ann, Mercia: an Anglo-Saxon kingdom in Europe, Continuum International Publishing Group, pp. 161–172, ISBN 0-8264-7765-8, retrieved 2009-06-08
  • Kirby, D. P. (2000), The earliest English kings, Routledge, ISBN 0-415-24210-X, retrieved 2009-06-07
  • Yorke, Barbara (1995), Wessex in the early Middle Ages, Continuum International Publishing Group, ISBN 0-7185-1856-X, retrieved 2009-06-07




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