(511002) 2013 MZ5

Summary

(511002) 2013 MZ5
(511002) 2013 MZ5.gif
2013 MZ5 imaged by the Pan-STARRS
survey in June 2013
Discovery[1]
Discovered byPan-STARRS 1
Discovery siteHaleakala Obs.
Discovery date18 June 2013
Designations
(511002) 2013 MZ5
2013 MZ5
NEO · Amor[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 27 April 2019 (JD 2458600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 1
Observation arc4.55 yr (1,662 d)
Aphelion1.8267 AU
Perihelion1.2785 AU
1.5526 AU
Eccentricity0.1766
1.93 yr (707 d)
299.77°
0° 30m 34.2s / day
Inclination29.148°
93.507°
274.17°
Earth MOID0.4613 AU (180 LD)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
300 m (est. at 0.18)[3][4]
20.1[1][2]

(511002) 2013 MZ5 , provisional designation 2013 MZ5, is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as a near-Earth object of the Amor group, estimated to measure approximately 300 meters (1,000 feet) in diameter. It was discovered on 18 June 2013, by astronomers with the Pan-STARRS survey at Haleakala Observatory on the island of Maui, Hawaii, in the United States.[1] It was the 10,000th near-Earth object ever discovered.[4]

Orbit and classification

2013 MZ5 is an Amor asteroid – a subgroup of near-Earth asteroids that approach the orbit of Earth from beyond, but do not cross it. It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.3–1.8 AU once every 23 months (707 days; semi-major axis of 1.55 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.18 and an inclination of 29° with respect to the ecliptic.[2] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at Haleakala in June 2013.[1]

Close approaches

The asteroid has an Earth minimum orbital intersection distance of 69,000,000 km (0.4613 AU), which translates into 180 lunar distances. It also makes close approaches to Mars. On 28 August 2125, it is projected to pass the Red Planet at a nominal distance of 13,600,000 km (0.0910 AU). With an aphelion of 1.83 AU, it is also a Mars-crossing asteroid.[2]

10,000th discovered NEO

2013 MZ5 was the 10,000th near-Earth object (NEO) ever discovered in June 2013 and considered a significant milestone in exploring the NEO population.[4]

Numbering and naming

This minor planet was numbered by the Minor Planet Center on 31 January 2018 and received the number 511002 in the minor planet catalog (M.P.C. 108621).[5] As of 2019, it has not been named.[1]

Physical characteristics

Diameter and albedo

2013 MZ5 measures approximately 300 meters in diameter for an absolute magnitude of 20.1 and an assumed albedo 0.18, which is typical value for stony asteroids.[3][4] A generic magnitude-to-diameter conversion on a wider range of possible albedos (0.30 to 0.05) gives a diameter between 230 and 570 meters.[3] As of 2019, no rotational lightcurve of 2013 MZ5 has been obtained from photometric observations. The object's effective size, rotation period, pole and shape remain unknown.[2][6]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "511002 (2013 MZ5)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 511002 (2013 MZ5)" (2018-01-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 9 January 2019.
  3. ^ a b c "Asteroid Size Estimator". CNEOS NASA/JPL. Retrieved 9 January 2019.
  4. ^ a b c d "511002 (2013 MZ5)". NASA/JPL. 24 June 2013. Retrieved 7 February 2018.
  5. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 January 2019.
  6. ^ "LCDB Data for (511002) – Not in Data Base". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 9 January 2019.

External links

  • List Of Amor Minor Planets (by designation), Minor Planet Center
  • (511002) 2013 MZ5 at NeoDyS-2, Near Earth Objects—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemeris · Obs prediction · Orbital info · MOID · Proper elements · Obs info · Close · Physical info · NEOCC
  • (511002) 2013 MZ5 at ESA–space situational awareness
    • Ephemerides · Observations · Orbit · Physical Properties · Summary
  • (511002) 2013 MZ5 at the JPL Small-Body Database Edit this at Wikidata
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters