106th United States Congress

Summary

The 106th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in Washington, D.C., from January 3, 1999, to January 3, 2001, during the last two years of Bill Clinton's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Twenty-first Census of the United States in 1990. Both chambers maintained a Republican majority. This is the most recent Congress with a Republican Senator from the state of Washington, Slade Gorton, who narrowly lost re-election in 2000.

106th United States Congress
105th ←
→ 107th
Capitol 07130011.jpg

January 3, 1999 – January 3, 2001
Members100 senators
435 representatives
5 non-voting delegates
Senate MajorityRepublican
Senate PresidentAl Gore (D)
House MajorityRepublican
House SpeakerDennis Hastert (R)
Sessions
1st: January 6, 1999 – November 22, 1999
2nd: January 24, 2000 – December 15, 2000

Major eventsEdit

Major legislationEdit

Treaties consideredEdit

Party summaryEdit

SenateEdit

 
Party standings on the opening day of the 106th Congress

Membership changed with two deaths.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 45 55 100 0
Begin 45 55 100 0
October 24, 1999[a] 54 99 1
November 2, 1999[a] 55 100 0
July 18, 2000[b] 54 99 1
July 25, 2000[b] 46 100 0
Final voting share 46% 54%
Beginning of the next Congress 50 50 100 0

House of RepresentativesEdit

There were two resignations and three deaths.

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Independent Republican Vacant
End of previous Congress 206 1 228 435 0
Begin 211 1 223 435 0
March 2, 1999 222 434 1
June 7, 1999 223 435 0
July 16, 1999 210 434 1
July 17, 1999 211 222 434 1
November 17, 1999 212 435 0
January 27, 2000 2 221 435 0
July 27, 2000 210 435 0
September 11, 2000 209 434 1
October 10, 2000 208 434 2
December 8, 2000 222 433 3
End 433 3
Final voting share 48.5% 0.3% 51.2%
Beginning of the next Congress 211 2 221 434 1

LeadershipEdit

SenateEdit

Senate President
 
Senate President pro Tempore

Majority (Republican) leadershipEdit

Minority (Democratic) leadershipEdit

House of RepresentativesEdit

Speaker of the House

Majority (Republican) leadershipEdit

Minority (Democratic) leadershipEdit

MembersEdit

Skip to House of Representatives, below

SenateEdit

In this Congress, Class 1 meant their term ended with this Congress, facing re-election in 2000; Class 2 meant their term began in the last Congress, facing re-election in 2002; and Class 3 meant their term began in this Congress, facing re-election in 2004.

House of RepresentativesEdit

Alabama — Alaska — Arizona — Arkansas — California — Colorado — Connecticut — Delaware — Florida — Georgia — Hawaii — Idaho — Illinois — Indiana — Iowa — Kansas — Kentucky — Louisiana — Maine — Maryland — Massachusetts — Michigan — Minnesota — Mississippi — Missouri — Montana — Nebraska — Nevada — New Hampshire — New Jersey — New Mexico — New York — North Carolina — North Dakota — Ohio — Oklahoma — Oregon — Pennsylvania — Rhode Island — South Carolina — South Dakota — Tennessee — Texas — Utah — Vermont — Virginia — Washington — West Virginia — Wisconsin — Wyoming — Non-voting members

Changes in membershipEdit

SenateEdit

State
(class)
Vacated by Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation[c]
Rhode Island
(1)
John Chafee (R) Died October 24, 1999.
Successor appointed on November 2, 1999 and later elected for a full term.
Lincoln Chafee (R) November 2, 1999
Georgia
(3)
Paul Coverdell (R) Died July 18, 2000.
Successor appointed on July 24, 2000 and later elected to finish the term.
Zell Miller (D) July 24, 2000

House of RepresentativesEdit

District Vacated by Reason for change Successor Date of successor's
formal installation[c]
Georgia 6th Vacant Newt Gingrich (R) resigned January 3, 1999.
Successor elected February 23, 1999.
Johnny Isakson (R) February 23, 1999
Louisiana 1st Bob Livingston (R) Resigned March 1, 1999.
Successor elected May 29, 1999.
David Vitter (R) May 29, 1999
California 42nd George Brown Jr. (D) Died July 15, 1999.
Successor elected November 16, 1999.
Joe Baca (D) November 16, 1999
New York 1st Michael Forbes (R) Changed political affiliation July 17, 1999. Michael Forbes (D) July 17, 1999
Virginia 5th Virgil Goode (D) Changed party affiliation January 27, 2000. Virgil Goode (I) January 27, 2000
California 31st Matthew G. Martínez (D) Changed party affiliation July 27, 2000. Matthew G. Martínez (R) July 27, 2000
Virginia 1st Herbert H. Bateman (R) Died September 11, 2000. Seat vacant until next Congress
Minnesota 4th Bruce Vento (D) Died October 10, 2000.
California 32nd Julian Dixon (D) Died December 8, 2000.

CommitteesEdit

For members (House and Senate) of the committees and their assignments, go into the Official Congressional Directory at the bottom of the article and click on the link (1 link), in the directory after the pages of terms of service, you will see the committees of the Senate, House (Standing with Subcommittees, Select and Special) and Joint and after the committee pages, you will see the House/Senate committee assignments in the directory, on the committees section of the House and Senate in the Official Congressional Directory, the committee's members on the first row on the left side shows the chairman of the committee and on the right side shows the ranking member of the committee.

SenateEdit

House of RepresentativesEdit

Joint committeesEdit

CaucusesEdit

EmployeesEdit

Legislative branch agency directorsEdit

SenateEdit

House of RepresentativesEdit

Exoneration of Charles Butler McVay IIIEdit

In October 2000, the United States Congress passed a Sense of Congress resolution that McVay's record should reflect that "he is exonerated for the loss of the USS Indianapolis." President Clinton also signed the resolution. which rightented the miscarriage of justice on Charles B. McVay III for the sinking of the USS Indianapolis in 30 July 1945 by Japanese submarine I-58 (1943)

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b In Rhode Island, John Chafee (R) died October 24, 1999, and his son, Lincoln Chafee (R), was appointed November 2, 1999, to finish the term.
  2. ^ a b In Georgia, Paul Coverdell (R) died July 18, 2000, and Zell Miller (D) was appointed July 25, to continue the term.
  3. ^ a b When seated or oath administered, not necessarily when service began.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, via THOMAS

External linksEdit

  • Biographical Directory of the United States Congress
  • History, Art and Archives from the U.S. House of Representatives
  • Statistics & Lists from the U.S. Senate
  • Legislative information Archived August 30, 2015, at the Wayback Machine from THOMAS at the Library of Congress
  • "Videos of House of Representatives Sessions for the 106th Congress from www.C-SPAN.org".
  • "Videos of Senate Sessions for the 106th Congress from www.C-SPAN.org".
  • "Videos of Committees from the House and Senate for the 106th Congress from www.C-SPAN.org".
  • House of Representatives Session Calendar for the 106th Congress (PDF).
  • Senate Session Calendar for the 106th Congress (PDF).
  • Congressional Pictorial Directory for the 106th Congress.
  • Official Congressional Directory for the 106th Congress.
  • Official Congressional Directory for the 106th Congress (1st Revision) (PDF).
  • Official Congressional Directory for the 106th Congress (2nd Revision) (PDF).