1976 in spaceflight

Summary

1976 in spaceflight
Viking2lander1.jpg
Viking 2 on the surface of Mars
Orbital launches
First6 January
Last28 December
Total131
Catalogued128
National firsts
Satellite Indonesia
Rockets
Maiden flightsThor DSV-2U
RetirementsVoskhod
Scout B-1
Soyuz
Soyuz-M
Thor-Burner
Crewed flights
Orbital3
Total travellers6

The following is an outline of 1976 in spaceflight.

Launches

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks
15 January
05:34:00
United StatesTitan IIIE/Star-37 United StatesCape Canaveral SLC-41 United StatesNASA
United StatesGermanyHelios-B NASA / DFVLR Heliocentric Solar probe In orbit Successful
Achieved a closest approach to the Sun of 43.432 million km (0.29 AU) on 17 April 1976, the closest approach achieved by an artificial satellite; it was succeeded by the Parker Solar Probe in 2018.
15 March
01:25:40[2]
United States Titan III(23)C United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States NASA
United States LES-8 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Geosynchronous Technology demonstration In orbit Successful
United States LES-9 MIT Lincoln Laboratory Geosynchronous Technology demonstration In orbit Successful
United States SOLRAD 11A NRL Geosynchronous Heliophysics In orbit Successful
United States SOLRAD 11B NRL Geosynchronous Heliophysics In orbit Successful
LES-8 was decommissioned in 2004; LES-9, the last Lincoln Experimental Satellite, continued functioning for 44 years and was finally decommissioned in 2020.[1]
22 June
18:04:00
Soviet UnionProton-K Soviet UnionBaikonur Site 81/23 Soviet Union
Soviet UnionSalyut 5 (Almaz OPS-3) Low Earth Space station 8 August 1977 Successful
Visited by three crews, one of which failed to dock
6 July
12:08:45
Soviet UnionSoyuz Soviet UnionBaikonur Site 1/5 Soviet Union
Soviet UnionSoyuz 21 Low Earth (Salyut 5) Salyut expedition 24 August
18:32:17
Partial mission failure
Crewed flight with two cosmonauts, final flight of Soyuz 11A511, returned early due to crew illness
15 September
09:48:30
Soviet UnionSoyuz-U Soviet UnionBaikonur Site 1/5 Soviet Union
Soviet UnionSoyuz 22 Low Earth Salyut expedition 23 September
07:40:47
Successful
Crewed flight with two cosmonauts
14 October
17:39:18
Soviet UnionSoyuz-U Soviet UnionBaikonur Site 1/5 Soviet Union
Soviet UnionSoyuz 23 Low Earth (Intended: Salyut 5) Salyut expedition 16 October
17:45:53
Spacecraft failure
Crewed flight with two cosmonauts, failed to dock with Salyut 5

Deep space rendezvous

Date Spacecraft Event Remarks
19 June Viking 1 Areocentric orbit insertion
20 July Viking 1 Lander landed in Chryse Planitia
7 August Viking 2 Areocentric orbit insertion
18 August Luna 24 landed in Mare Crisium sample return mission
19 August Luna 24 lift-off from Mare Crisium 170 grams (6.0 oz)
3 September Viking 2 Lander landed in Utopia Planitia

References

Generic references:
RocketSunIcon.svg Spaceflight portal
  • Bergin, Chris. "NASASpaceFlight.com".
  • Clark, Stephen. "Spaceflight Now".
  • Kelso, T.S. "Satellite Catalog (SATCAT)". CelesTrak.
  • Krebs, Gunter. "Chronology of Space Launches".
  • Kyle, Ed. "Space Launch Report".
  • McDowell, Jonathan. "Jonathan's Space Report".
  • Pietrobon, Steven. "Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive".
  • Wade, Mark. "Encyclopedia Astronautica".
  • Webb, Brian. "Southwest Space Archive".
  • Zak, Anatoly. "Russian Space Web".
  • "ISS Calendar". Spaceflight 101.
  • "NSSDCA Master Catalog". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • "Space Calendar". NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
  • "Space Information Center". JAXA.
  • "Хроника освоения космоса" [Chronicle of space exploration]. CosmoWorld (in Russian).

Footnotes

  1. ^ Ryan, Dorothy (27 May 2020). "Lincoln Laboratory decommissions Lincoln Experimental Satellite–9". MIT. Retrieved 6 December 2020.
  2. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Report. Retrieved 6 December 2020.