2000 Japanese general election

Summary

General elections were held in Japan on 25 June 2000 to elect the 480 members of the House of Representatives.

2000 Japanese general election

← 1996 25 June 2000 2003 →

All 480 seats in the House of Representatives of Japan
241 seats needed for a majority
Turnout64.44% (Increase4.8%)
  First party Second party Third party
  Yoshiro Mori.jpg Hatoyama Yukio.jpg
Leader Yoshirō Mori Yukio Hatoyama Takenori Kanzaki
Party LDP Democratic Komeito
Leader since 5 April 2000 25 September 1999 7 November 1998
Leader's seat Ishikawa-2nd Hokkaido-9th Kyushu-PR
Last election 239 seats, 32.76%
Seats won 233 127 31
Seat change Decrease6 New New
Popular vote 16,943,425 15,067,990 7,762,032
Percentage 28.31% 25.18% 12.97%
Swing Decrease4.45pp New New

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Ichiro Ozawa cropped 3 Yoshitaka Kimoto and Ichiro Ozawa 20010718.jpg Takako Doi in Tokyo congressist election 2.jpg
Leader Ichirō Ozawa Tetsuzo Fuwa Takako Doi
Party Liberal Communist Social Democratic
Leader since 6 January 1996 29 May 1989 28 September 1996
Leader's seat Iwate-4th Tokyo-PR Hyōgo-7th
Last election 26 seats, 13.08% 15 seats, 6.38%
Seats won 22 20 19
Seat change New Decrease6 Increase4
Popular vote 6,589,490 6,719,016 5,603,680
Percentage 11.01% 11.23% 9.36%
Swing New Decrease1.85pp Increase2.98pp

  Seventh party Eighth party Ninth party
  Chikage Ogi 2006.png
Leader Chikage Oogi Motoo Shiina Torao Tokuda
Party New Conservative Independents Liberal League
Leader since 3 April 2000 December 1999 January 1998
Leader's seat Not contesting
(Councillor)
Not contesting
(Councillor)
Kagoshima-2nd
Last election
Seats won 7 5 1
Seat change New New New
Popular vote 5,603,680 151,345 660,724
Percentage 0.41% 0.25% 1.10%
Swing New New New

2000 JAPAN GENERAL ELECTION, winner vote share.svg
districts and PR districts, shaded according to winners' vote strength.

Prime Minister before election

Yoshirō Mori
LDP

Prime Minister after election

Yoshirō Mori
LDP

The ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) maintained a majority in the House of Representatives, but its total percentage of seats shrank from 65% to 56%, and its two coalition partners also lost several seats. Two cabinet members, Takashi Fukaya and Tokuichiro Tamazawa, lost their seats. The Democratic Party made major gains under the leadership of Yukio Hatoyama.[1]

BackgroundEdit

Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi suffered a stroke in April 2000 and was replaced by Yoshiro Mori. Although the term limit for the House of Representatives would have been reached in October 2000, Mori dissolved the House on June 2 in what became popularly known as the Divine Nation Dissolution (神の国解散) due to a controversial statement by Mori prior to the election, which preceded a slump in government approval ratings from 40% to 20%. The LDP government advocated continued public works spending while the opposition advocated less spending and more governmental reforms.[2]

The Social Democratic Party left the coalition in 1998 and re-join the opposition after years of coalition with the ideologically contrasting LDP.

Meanwhile, the Komeito Party, a centrist party with roots from the Soka Gakkai based on the Nichiren Buddhist movement and despite almost decades of opposition against the LDP, shifted from centre towards conservatism. An electoral alliance between the once rivals of the Komeito and the LDP has been in effect since the Japanese General election in 2000. For the LDP, despite not being able to win an absolute majority of votes by itself in further elections (especially for the House of Councillors which the LDP lost majority since 1989), the Komeito party has been counted on since then to ensure a stable governing majority rule.

ResultsEdit

 
Constituency Cartogram

The House of Representatives consisted of 480 members, 300 elected from single-member constituencies and 180 elected on a proportional basis from eleven multi-member constituencies known as Block constituencies.

 
PartyProportionalConstituencyTotal
seats
+/–
Votes%SeatsVotes%Seats
Liberal Democratic Party16,943,42528.315624,945,80740.97177233–6
Democratic Party of Japan15,067,99025.184716,811,73227.6180127New
New Komeito Party7,762,03212.97241,231,7532.02731New
Japanese Communist Party6,719,01611.23207,352,84412.08020–6
Liberal Party6,589,49011.01182,053,7363.37422New
Social Democratic Party 5,603,6809.36152,315,2353.80419+4
Liberal League660,7241.1001,071,0121.7611New
New Conservative Party247,3340.4101,230,4642.0277New
Assembly of Independents151,3450.250652,1381.0755New
Other parties99,5650.170250,6810.4100
Independents2,967,0694.871515+6
Total59,844,601100.0018060,882,471100.00300480–20
Valid votes59,844,60195.3760,882,47197.01
Invalid/blank votes2,904,9834.631,877,3182.99
Total votes62,749,584100.0062,759,789100.00
Registered voters/turnout100,492,32862.44100,433,79862.49
Source: Election Resources, IPU

By prefectureEdit

Prefecture Total
seats
Seats won
LDP DPJ NKP NCP AI SDP LP LL Ind.
Aichi 15 5 9 1
Akita 3 3
Aomori 4 3 1
Chiba 12 7 5
Ehime 4 4
Fukui 3 3
Fukuoka 11 8 2 1
Fukushima 5 3 1 1
Gifu 5 5
Gunma 5 5
Hiroshima 7 5 1 1
Hokkaido 13 7 6
Hyōgo 12 3 3 2 2 1 1
Ibaraki 7 5 1 1
Ishikawa 3 3
Iwate 4 1 3
Kagawa 3 2 1
Kagoshima 5 4 1
Kanagawa 17 9 6 1 1
Kōchi 3 3
Kumamoto 5 2 1 1 1
Kyoto 6 5 1
Mie 5 2 2 1
Miyagi 6 2 4
Miyazaki 3 3
Nagano 5 3 2
Nagasaki 4 2 1 1
Nara 4 4
Niigata 6 4 1 1
Ōita 4 2 1 1
Okayama 5 5
Okinawa 3 1 1 1
Osaka 19 8 5 4 1 1
Saga 3 3
Saitama 14 6 6 1 1
Shiga 3 2 1
Shimane 3 3
Shizuoka 9 4 4 1
Tochigi 5 4 1
Tokushima 3 2 1
Tokyo 25 8 13 1 3
Tottori 2 2
Toyama 3 3
Wakayama 3 1 1 1
Yamagata 4 3 1
Yamaguchi 4 3 1
Yamanashi 3 2 1
Total 300 177 80 7 7 5 4 4 1 15

By PR blockEdit

PR block Total
seats
Seats won
LDP DPJ NKP JCP LP SDP
Chūgoku 11 4 2 2 1 1 1
Hokkaido 8 2 3 1 1 1
Hokuriku–Shinetsu 11 4 3 1 1 1 1
Kinki 30 7 7 5 5 3 3
Kyushu 21 7 4 3 2 2 3
Northern Kanto 20 7 5 3 2 2 1
Shikoku 6 3 1 1 1
Southern Kanto 21 6 6 3 2 2 2
Tohoku 14 5 3 1 1 3 1
Tokai 21 7 7 2 2 2 1
Tokyo 17 4 6 2 2 2 1
Total 180 56 47 24 20 18 15

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ French, Howard (26 June 2000). "GOVERNING PARTY IN JAPAN SUFFERS ELECTION SETBACK". New York Times. Retrieved 27 January 2014.
  2. ^ "JAPAN Parliamentary Chamber: Shugiin ELECTIONS HELD IN 2000". IPU.org. Retrieved 27 January 2014.