2006 QH181

Summary

2006 QH181
2006qh181 hst.jpg
Hubble Space Telescope image of 2006 QH181 taken in 2010
Discovery
Discovered byCTIO
Discovery date21 August 2006
Designations
2006 QH181
Orbital characteristics[4]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)[4]
Uncertainty parameter 6
Observation arc2634 days (7.21 yr)
Aphelion96.680 AU (14.4631 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion37.789 AU (5.6532 Tm) (q)
67.235 AU (10.0582 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity0.43795 (e)
551.31 yr (201366 d)
102.28° (M)
0° 0m 6.436s / day (n)
Inclination19.144° (i)
73.840° (Ω)
211.02° (ω)
Earth MOID36.7863 AU (5.50315 Tm)
Jupiter MOID32.6588 AU (4.88569 Tm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions
23.6[7]
4.3[4]

2006 QH181, also written as 2006 QH181, is a trans-Neptunian object (TNO) in the scattered disc.[2][3] Its orbit is currently too poorly determined (U=6)[4] to know whether it is in a resonance with Neptune.

Distance

It came to perihelion around 1858.[4] It is currently 83.8 AU from the Sun[7] and moving away from the Sun at 1.04 kilometers per second (2,300 miles per hour).[8] The only large objects currently farther from the Sun are Eris (96.1 AU),[9] 2014 UZ224 (90.9 AU), 2015 TH367 (~89 AU), Gonggong (88.0 AU),[10] Sedna (85.1 AU),[11] 2013 FS28 (84.8 AU), and 2014 FC69 (84.7 AU). Because it is so far from the Sun, it only has an apparent magnitude of 23.6.[7]

Orbit

It has been observed 15 times over only three oppositions and thus currently has a somewhat poorly known orbit. JPL ranks orbital quality from 0 to 9 (0 being best), and 2006 QH181 is currently listed with an orbit quality of 6.[4][12]

2006 QH181-orbit.png

See also

References

  1. ^ "MPEC 2008-O05 : Distant Minor Planets". Minor Planet Center & Tamkin Foundation Computer Network. 17 July 2008. Retrieved 29 July 2008.
  2. ^ a b "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". MPC. Retrieved 3 March 2007.
  3. ^ a b Marc W. Buie (5 March 2008). "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 06QH181". SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 28 February 2014.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2006 QH181)" (last observation: 2013-11-06; arc: 7.21 years). Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  5. ^ "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 1 September 2008. Retrieved 29 July 2008.
  6. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston. "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 18 February 2007. Retrieved 3 March 2007.
  7. ^ a b c "AstDyS 2006QH181 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 6 April 2014.
  8. ^ "Horizon Online Ephemeris System". California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 22 January 2009.
  9. ^ "AstDyS (136199) Eris Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 31 January 2012.
  10. ^ "AstDyS 2007OR10 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 31 January 2012.
  11. ^ "AstDyS (90377) Sedna Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 31 January 2012.
  12. ^ "2006 QH181". Minor Planet Center, IAU. Retrieved 5 February 2014.

External links

  • 2006 QH181 at AstDyS-2, Asteroids—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemeris · Observation prediction · Orbital info · Proper elements · Observational info
  • 2006 QH181 at the JPL Small-Body Database
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters