2016 AJ193

Summary

2016 AJ193
2016AJ193 Goldstone radar Aug22.gif
Doppler-delay radar images of 2016 AJ193 from the Goldstone Radar on 22 August 2021
Discovery [1][2]
Discovered byWISE
Discovery siteLow Earth orbit
Discovery date17 May 2010
(first observation only)
Designations
2016 AJ193
2010 KV134
NEO · Apollo · PHA[3]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 1 July 2020 (JD 2459396.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc11.51 yr (4,204 days)
Earliest precovery date16 February 2010
Aphelion5.931 AU
Perihelion0.5999 AU
3.265 AU
Eccentricity0.8163
5.90 yr (2,155 days)
344.173°
0° 10m 1.359s / day
Inclination22.570°
331.285°
81.996°
Earth MOID0.01553 AU (2,323,000 km)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
1.374±0.403 km[3]
3.508±0.001 h[4]
0.031±0.031[3]
18.99 [3][1]

2016 AJ193, also known as 2010 KV134, is a near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group, approximately 1.4 kilometres (0.87 mi) in diameter. It was discovered on 17 May 2010 by the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite, but was lost until it was reobserved on 16 January 2016.[5][2] With an observation arc over 11 years, 2016 AJ193 has a well-determined orbit and trajectory through the year 2086.[3] The asteroid's orbit is only potentially hazardous on a time scale of thousands of years.[6][7]

On 21 August 2021, the asteroid safely made a close approach to Earth from a distance of 0.0229 AU (3.43 million km; 2.13 million mi), or 8.92 lunar distances (LD). During closest approach, 2016 AJ193 reached a peak apparent magnitude of 14, visible to ground-based observers with telescope apertures of at least 20 cm (8 in).[4][6] It is the largest asteroid that approached within 10 LD (3.8 million km; 2.4 million mi) of Earth in 2021.[8]

2016 AJ193's rotation shown in radar images taken by Goldstone on 22 August 2021

References

  1. ^ a b "2016 AJ193". Minor Planet Center. International Astronomical Union. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  2. ^ a b "MPEC 2020-B104 : 2016 AJ193". Minor Planet Electronic Circular. Minor Planet Center. 23 January 2020. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2016 AJ193)" (2021-08-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  4. ^ a b Benner, Lance A. M. "Goldstone Radar Observations Planning: 2016 AJ193 and 2011 UC292". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  5. ^ "MPEC 2016-B28 : 2016 AJ193". Minor Planet Electronic Circular. Minor Planet Center. 18 January 2016. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  6. ^ a b Irizarry, Ezzie (20 August 2021). "Heads Up! Close Asteroid Pass August 21". EarthSky. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  7. ^ O'Neill, Ian J.; Fox, Karen; Handal, Joshua (3 September 2021). "Planetary Radar Observes 1,000th Near-Earth Asteroid Since 1968". Jet Propulsion Laboratory. NASA. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  8. ^ "NEO Earth Close Approaches". Center for Near Earth Object Studies. Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 3 March 2021.

External links

  • Goldstone Radar Observations Planning: 2016 AJ193 and 2011 UC292, Lance A. M. Benner, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
  • Radar Reveals the Surface of Asteroid 2016 AJ193, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 3 September 2021
  • 2016 AJ193 at NeoDyS-2, Near Earth Objects—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemeris · Obs prediction · Orbital info · MOID · Proper elements · Obs info · Close · Physical info · NEOCC
  • 2016 AJ193 at the JPL Small-Body Database
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters