26 Proserpina

Summary

26 Proserpina 26 Proserpina symbol.svg
A713.M1189.shape.png
Three-dimensional model of 26 Proserpina created based on light-curve inversions.
Discovery
Discovered byR. Luther
Discovery dateMay 5, 1853
Designations
(26) Proserpina
Pronunciation/prˈsɜːrpɪnə/[1]
Named after
Proserpina
1935 KK; 1954 WD1
Main belt
AdjectivesProserpinian /ˌprɒsərˈpɪniən/[2]
Orbital characteristics
Epoch June 14, 2006 (JD 2453900.5)
Aphelion431.898 Gm (2.887 AU)
Perihelion362.816 Gm (2.425 AU)
397.357 Gm (2.656 AU)
Eccentricity0.087
1581.184 d (4.33 a)
115.619°
Inclination3.562°
45.884°
193.120°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions94.8 ± 1.7 km (IRAS)[3]
89.63 ± 3.55 km[4]
Mass(7.48 ± 8.95) × 1017 kg[4]
Mean density
1.98 ± 2.38 g/cm3[4]
13.11 h[3][5]
0.1966[3][6]
S[3]
7.5[3]

Proserpina (minor planet designation: 26 Proserpina) is a main-belt asteroid discovered by German astronomer R. Luther on May 5, 1853. It is named after the Roman goddess Proserpina, the daughter of Ceres and the Queen of the Underworld. Another main-belt asteroid, 399 Persephone, discovered in 1895, is named after her Greek counterpart.

This object is orbiting the Sun with a period of 4.33 years. It has a cross-section size of around 90 km and a stony (S-type) composition. Photometric observations of this asteroid have produced discrepant estimates of the rotation period. A period of 12.13 hours was reported in 1979, followed by 10.6 hours in 1981 and 6.67 hours in 2001. Observations made in 2007 at the Oakley Observatory in Terre Haute, Indiana produced a light curve with a period of 13.06 ± 0.03 hours and a brightness variation of 0.21 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[7] This was refined by a 2008 study, giving a period of 13.110 ± 0.001 hours.[8]

References

  1. ^ Noah Webster (1884) A Practical Dictionary of the English Language
  2. ^ E.g. Andrew & Reid (2003) Two Hundred Years of Pushkin
  3. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 26 Proserpina" (2011-12-30 last obs). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  4. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73 (1): 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009, S2CID 119226456. See Table 1.
  5. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_DERIVED_LIGHTCURVE_V8_0/data/lc.tab
  6. ^ http://www.psi.edu/pds/asteroid/EAR_A_5_DDR_ALBEDOS_V1_1/data/albedos.tab
  7. ^ Ditteon, Richard; Hawkins, Scot (September 2007), "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Oakley Observatory - October-November 2006", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 34 (3): 59–64, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...59D.
  8. ^ Pilcher, Frederick (September 2008), "Period Determinations for 26 Proserpina, 34 Circe 74 Galatea, 143 Adria, 272 Antonia, 419 Aurelia, and 557 Violetta", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (3): 135–138, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35..135P.

External links

  • 26 Proserpina at AstDyS-2, Asteroids—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemeris · Observation prediction · Orbital info · Proper elements · Observational info
  • 26 Proserpina at the JPL Small-Body Database Edit this at Wikidata
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters