Aeolus

Summary

In Greek mythology, Aeolus[1] (/ˈləs/; Ancient Greek: Αἴολος, romanizedAíolos [ǎi̯.o.los], Greek: [ˈe.o.los] (About this soundlisten), lit.'quick-moving, nimble') is a name shared by three mythical characters. These three personages are often difficult to tell apart, and even the ancient mythographers appear to have been perplexed about which Aeolus was which. Diodorus Siculus made an attempt to define each of these three (although it is clear that he also became muddled), and his opinion is followed here.[2]

All three men named Aeolus appear to be connected genealogically, although the precise relationship, especially regarding the second and third Aeolus, is often ambiguous as their identities seem to have been merged by many ancient writers.

Aeolus was also the name of the following minor characters:

Notes

  1. ^ Chaucer's Eolus (de Weever, Jacqueline (1996). Chaucer Name Dictionary, s.v. "Eolus". (Garland Publishing) Retrieved on 2009-10-06
  2. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1864), "Aeolus (1), (2) and (3)", in Smith, William (ed.), Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, 1, p. 35, archived from the original on 2013-10-09, retrieved 2007-10-25
  3. ^ Apollodorus, 1.7.3
  4. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 238 & 242
  5. ^ Homer, Odyssey 10.2
  6. ^ Statius, Thebaid 9.765
  7. ^ Virgil, Aeneid 6.163 ff., 9.774 & 12.542
  8. ^ Thomas, Richard F. (2009). "The Isolation of Turnus (Aeneid, book 12)". In Stahl, Hans-Peter (ed.). Vergil's Aeneid: Augustan Epic and Political Context. Classical Press of Wales. pp. 271–303. ISBN 9781910589304.

References

  • Apollodorus The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4 Online version at the Perseus Digital Library Greek text available from the same website
  • Gaius Julius Hyginus Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies Online version at the Topos Text Project
  • Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, Maine, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919 Online version at the Perseus Digital Library Greek text available from the same website
  • Publius Papinius Statius The Thebaid translated by John Henry Mozley. Loeb Classical Library Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1928. Online version at the Topos Text Project
  • Publius Papinius Statius, The Thebaid. Vol I-II John Henry Mozley. London: William Heinemann; New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. 1928 Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Publius Vergilius Maro Aeneid Theodore C. Williams. trans. Boston. Houghton Mifflin Co. 1910 Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Publius Vergilius Maro, Bucolics, Aeneid, and Georgics J. B. Greenough. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1900 Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library
This article includes a list of Greek mythological figures with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific Greek mythology article referred you to this page, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended Greek mythology article, if one exists.