Aepytus I of Arcadia

Summary

In Greek mythology, Aepytus (Ancient Greek: Αἵπυτος) was one of the mythical kings of Arcadia who originally ruled over Phaesana on the Alpheius. He was the son of Elatus.[1]

Mythology

When Cleitor, the son of Azan, died without leaving any issue, Aepytus succeeded him and became king of the Arcadians, a part of whose country was called after him Aepytis.[2] He is said to have been killed during the chase on Mount Sepia by the bite of a venomous snake.[3] His tomb there was still shown in the time of Pausanias, and he was anxious to see it, because it was mentioned by Homer.[4]

Notes

  1. ^ Pindar, Olympian Odes 6.54
  2. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.4.4 & 8.34.3
  3. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.4.4 & 8.16.2
  4. ^ Homer, Iliad 2.604

References

  • Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. ISBN 978-0674995796. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. ISBN 978-0198145318. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, Odes translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien. 1990. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, The Odes of Pindar including the Principal Fragments with an Introduction and an English Translation by Sir John Sandys, Litt.D., FBA. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1937. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.