Agapenor

Summary

In Greek mythology, Agapenor (Ancient Greek: Ἀγαπήνωρ, gen. Ἀγαπήνορος means 'much distress'[1]) was a leader of the Arcadians in the Trojan war.[2]

FamilyEdit

Agapenor was a son of Ancaeus, and grandson of Lycurgus.

MythologyEdit

As king of the Arcadians, Agapenor received sixty ships from Agamemnon, in which he led his Arcadians to Troy.[3] He also occurs among the suitors of Helen[4] and one of the men to be in the Trojan Horse.[5]

On Agapenor's return from Troy he was cast by a storm on the coast of Cyprus, where he founded the town of Paphos and in it the famous temple of Aphrodite.[6] He also occurs in the story of Alcmaeon: it was to him that Arsinoe (Alphesiboea), Alcmaeon's wife was sold away by her own brothers.[7]

Agapenor had a descendant Laodice, who was known for having sent to Tegea a robe (peplos) as a gift to Athena Alea,[8] and to have built a temple of Aphrodite Paphia in Tegea.[9]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Graves, Robert (2017). The Greek Myths - The Complete and Definitive Edition. Penguin Books Limited. pp. Index s.v. Agapenor. ISBN 9780241983386.
  2. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1867), "Agapenor", in Smith, William (ed.), Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, vol. 1, Boston, p. 59, archived from the original on 2010-06-16, retrieved 2007-12-28
  3. ^ Homer, Iliad 2.609; Hyginus, Fabulae 97
  4. ^ Apollodorus, 3.10.8; Hyginus, Fabulae 81
  5. ^ Homer, The Iliad translated by Richmond Lattimore, 1951
  6. ^ Pausanias, 8.5.2
  7. ^ Apollodorus, 3.7.5
  8. ^ Pausanias, 8.5.3
  9. ^ Pausanias, 8.53.7

ReferencesEdit

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Graves, Robert, The Greek Myths, Harmondsworth, London, England, Penguin Books, 1960. ISBN 978-0143106715
  • Graves, Robert, The Greek Myths: The Complete and Definitive Edition. Penguin Books Limited. 2017. ISBN 978-0-241-98338-6, 024198338X
  • Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.


  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "Agapenor". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.