Agusta-Bell AB.102

Summary

The Agusta AB.102 was an Italian helicopter produced in small numbers in the early 1960s. The aircraft was based on the mechanical components of a Bell 48 that Agusta incorporated into an all-new, streamlined fuselage. The first flight was on 3 February 1959 and the prototype was exhibited at that year's Paris Air Show in faux military colours. Only two production examples were built, operated by Elivie in a regular air service between Turin and Milan from 1961. However, the advent of turbine-powered helicopters in the 1960s soon rendered the AB.102 obsolete.

AB.102
Agusta-Bell AB.102.jpg
Role Utility helicopter
Manufacturer Agusta
First flight 3 February 1959
Introduction 1961
Primary user Elivie
Number built 3
Developed from Bell 48

OperatorsEdit

  Italy

SpecificationsEdit

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62[3]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity:
    • 7–9 passengers or
    • 4 stretchers and 1 attendant or
    • 880 kg (1,940 lb) cargo
  • Length: 12.73 m (41 ft 9 in) (fuselage length); Overall length 17.92 m (58 ft 10 in)
  • Height: 3.23 m (10 ft 7 in)
  • Empty weight: 1,810 kg (3,990 lb)
  • Gross weight: 2,725 kg (6,008 lb)
  • Max takeoff weight: 3,025 kg (6,669 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-1340-S1H4 radial engine, 450 kW (600 hp)
  • Main rotor diameter: 14.50 m (47 ft 7 in)
  • Main rotor area: 165.1 m2 (1,777 sq ft)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 174 km/h (108 mph, 94 kn) at sea level
  • Cruise speed: 160 km/h (99 mph, 86 kn) at 600 m (1,970 ft) (best range speed)
  • Range: 350 km (220 mi, 190 nmi) with 7 passengers and 115 kg (254 lb) baggage
  • Endurance: 3 hr 20 min
  • Service ceiling: 3,900 m (12,800 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 5.6 m/s (1,100 ft/min)

See alsoEdit

Related development

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "WORLD AIRLINE SURVEY 1963". flightglobal.com. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  2. ^ "World Helicopter Market 1967". flightglobal.com. Retrieved 18 October 2014.
  3. ^ Taylor 1961, p. 98.
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1961). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 40.
  • Simpson, R. W. (1998). Airlife's Helicopters and Rotorcraft. Ramsbury: Airlife Publishing. p. 36.