Androktasiai

Summary

The Androctasiae
Personifications of Slaughter
Member of the Family of Eris
AbodeUnderworld (possibly)
Personal information
ParentsEris[1]
SiblingsLethe, Ponos, Algos, Hysminai, Limos, Phonoi, Machai, Neikea, Amphillogiai, Pseudea, Logoi, Dysnomia, Atë, Horkos

In Greek mythology, the Androctasiae or Androktasiai (Ancient Greek: Ἀνδροκτασίαι; singular: Androktasia) were the female personifications of manslaughter.

Family

The Androctasiae were the daughters of the goddess of strife and discord, Eris,[2] and siblings to other vicious personifications like the Hysminai, the Machae, and the Phonoi. This name is also used for all of Eris' children collectively, as a whole group.

"And hateful Eris bore painful Ponos ("Hardship"),
Lethe ("Forgetfulness") and Limos ("Starvation") and the tearful Algea ("Pains"),
Hysminai ("Battles"), Makhai ("Wars"), Phonoi ("Murders"), and Androktasiai ("Manslaughters");
Neikea ("Quarrels"), Pseudea ("Lies"), Logoi ("Stories"), Amphillogiai ("Disputes")
Dysnomia ("Anarchy") and Ate ("Ruin"), near one another,
and Horkos ("Oath"), who most afflicts men on earth,
Then willing swears a false oath."[3][4]

Mythology

In the epic poem the Shield of Heracles, attributed to Hesiod, Androktasia (singular) was one of the many figures, depicted on Heracles' shield.[5]

"In his hands he (Herakles) took his shield, all glittering : no one ever broke it with a blow or crushed it. And a wonder it was to see . . . In the centre was Phobos (Fear) worked in adamant, unspeakable, staring backwards with eyes that glowed with fire. His mouth was full of teeth in a white row, fearful and daunting, and upon his grim brow hovered frightful Eris (Battle-Strife) who arrays the throng of men: pitiless she, for she took away the mind and senses of poor wretches who made war against the son of Zeus . . . Upon the shield Proioxis (Pursuit) and Palioxis (Flight) were wrought, and Homados (Tumult), and Phobos (Panic), and Androktasia (Slaughter). Eris (Battle-Strife) also, and Kydoimos (Confusion) were hurrying about, and deadly Ker (Fate) was there holding one man newly wounded. . ."[6]

Notes

  1. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 228
  2. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 228
  3. ^ Caldwell, p. 42 lines 226-232, with the meanings of the names (in parentheses), as given by Caldwell, p. 40 on lines 212–232.
  4. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 226–232 Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  5. ^ Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 155. Others include for example Phobos (Fear), Eris, Phonos (Murder), and Ker (Fate), see Most, pp. 12–15.
  6. ^ Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 135–157 Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

References

  • Caldwell, Richard, Hesiod's Theogony, Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Company (June 1, 1987). ISBN 978-0-941051-00-2.
  • Hesiod, Shield of Heracles from The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Hesiod, Theogony, in The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, Massachusetts., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Most, G.W., Hesiod: The Shield, Catalogue of Women, Other Fragments, Loeb Classical Library, No. 503, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press, 2007, 2018. ISBN 978-0-674-99721-9. Online version at Harvard University Press.