Anglo-Indian reserved seats in the Lok Sabha

Summary

Between 1952 and 2020, two seats were reserved in the Lok Sabha, the lower house of the Parliament of India, for members of the Anglo-Indian community. These two members were nominated by the President of India on the advice of the Government of India. In January 2020, the Anglo-Indian reserved seats in the Parliament and State Legislatures of India were discontinued by the 126th Constitutional Amendment Bill of 2019, when enacted as the 104th Constitutional Amendment Act, 2019.[1][2]

The Article 331 of the Indian Constitution gave reservation to the Anglo-Indian community during the creation of the Constitution, the article 331 also says that this reservation would cease to exist 10 years after the commencement of the Constitution. But this reservation was extended to 1970 through the 8th Amendment. The period of reservation was extended to 1980 through 23rd amendment and then to 1990 through 45th amendments, to 2006 through 62nd amendment, to 2010 through 79th amendments and to 2020 through the 95th Amendment.[3] In January 2020, the Anglo-Indian reserved seats in the Parliament and State Legislatures of India were abolished by the 104th Constitutional Amendment Act, 2019.[4][5] The reason cited by the Union Law Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad who introduced the Bill in the Lok Sabha is that the Anglo-Indians population in India was just 296 in the 2011 Census of India, though the number is disputed.[6]

HistoryEdit

The Anglo-Indian community were the only community in India that had its own representatives nominated to the Lok Sabha (lower house) in the Parliament of India. This right was secured from Jawaharlal Nehru by Frank Anthony, the first and long-time president of the All India Anglo-Indian Association. The community was represented by two members. This was done because the community had no native state of its own. Fourteen states of India (Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Gujarat, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Kerala, Madhya Pradesh, Maharashtra, Telangana, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand and West Bengal) also had a nominated member each in their respective State Legislative Assemblies.

The reserved seats were expected to have been phased out by the 1960s, but continued to be renewed by successive governments, until this provision was abolished in 2020.[7]

Before independenceEdit

Henry Gidney was a nominated member of the Central Legislative Assembly under the 'Special Interests/Anglo-Indian' category in the 1920, 1923, 1926, 1930, and 1934 elections.

Historical Anglo-Indian members in the Lok SabhaEdit

The following is a list of members nominated for the seats after each election.[8]

Election Member Party Member Party
1951–52 Frank Anthony Independent A. E. T. Barrow Independent
1957
1962
1967
1971 Marjorie Godfrey
1977 Rudolph Rodrigues Janata Party A. E. T. Barrow
1980 Frank Anthony Indian National Congress Indian National Congress
1984
1989 Joss Fernandez Janata Dal Paul Mantosh Janata Dal
1991 Frank Anthony Indian National Congress Robert E. Williams Indian National Congress
1993 vacant
1995 Sheila F. Irani Indian National Congress
1996 Neil O'Brien Hedwig Rego
1998 Beatrix D'Souza Samata Party Neville Foley Samata Party
1999 Denzil B. Atkinson Bharatiya Janata Party
2004 Ingrid McLeod Indian National Congress Francis Fanthome Indian National Congress
2009 Charles Dias
2014 George Baker Bharatiya Janata Party Richard Hay Bharatiya Janata Party

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Anglo Indian Representation To Lok Sabha, State Assemblies Done Away; SC-ST Reservation Extended For 10 Years: Constitution (104th Amendment) Act To Come Into Force On 25th Jan" (PDF). egazette.nic.in. Retrieved 25 January 2020.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  2. ^ "Anglo Indian Members of Parliament (MPs) of India - Powers, Salary, Eligibility, Term". www.elections.in.
  3. ^ "Centre notifies constitutional amendment doing away with quota for Anglo Indian". Retrieved 3 June 2020.
  4. ^ "Anglo Indian Representation To Lok Sabha, State Assemblies Done Away; SC-ST Reservation Extended For 10 Years: Constitution (104th Amendment) Act To Come Into Force On 25th Jan". www.livelaw.in. 23 January 2020. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  5. ^ "Anglo Indian Members of Parliament (MPs) of India - Powers, Salary, Eligibility, Term". www.elections.in.
  6. ^ Sumeet Kaul. "Who are the Anglo-Indians and why do they have a quota in Lok Sabha and some state legislatures?". Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  7. ^ Safi, Michael (April 16, 2019). "The two MPs of British descent who do not have to stand in Indian election" – via www.theguardian.com.
  8. ^ "Anglo Indian MP's In India". www.aiadanapur.org.