Asmat Regency

Summary

Asmat Regency is one of the regencies (kabupaten) in the southern portion of Papua Province of Indonesia. It was split off from Merauke Regency (of which it had been a part) on 12 November 2002. Asmat Regency consists of an area of 31,983.44 km2, and had a population of 76,577 at the 2010 Census,[3] 88,373 at the 2015 Intermediate Census,[4] and 110,105 at the 2020 Census,[5]mostly from the Asmat ethnic group. The administrative centre of the regency is the town of Agats.

Asmat Regency
Kabupaten Asmat
Icon of Asmat Regency
Icon of Asmat Regency
Coat of arms of Asmat Regency
Motto(s): 
Ja Asamanam Apcamar
(Onward with Balance)
91.18.00 Papua Asmat.svg
Asmat Regency is located in Western New Guinea
Asmat Regency
Asmat Regency
Asmat Regency is located in Indonesia
Asmat Regency
Asmat Regency
Asmat Regency (Indonesia)
Coordinates: 5°22′46″S 138°27′48″E / 5.3795°S 138.4634°E / -5.3795; 138.4634Coordinates: 5°22′46″S 138°27′48″E / 5.3795°S 138.4634°E / -5.3795; 138.4634
Country Indonesia
Province Papua
CapitalAgats
Government
 • RegentElisa Kambu
 • Vice RegentThomas E. Safanpo
Area
 • Total31,983.44 km2 (12,348.88 sq mi)
Population
 (2020 Census)[1]
 • Total110,105
 • Density3.4/km2 (8.9/sq mi)
Demographics
 • ReligionChristianism 93,67%
Catholicism 57,70%
Protestantism 35,97%
Islam 6,29%
Hinduism 0,03%
Buddhism 0,01%
Time zoneUTC+9 (Indonesia Eastern Time)
Area code(+62) 902
Websiteasmatkab.go.id

A measles outbreak and famine killed at least 72 people in Asmat regency in early 2018,[6][7] during which 652 children were affected by measles and 223 suffered from malnutrition.[8][9]

Administrative districtsEdit

Asmat Regency in 2010 comprised eight districts (distrik), listed below with their populations at the 2010 Census.[10]

District Population
2010 Census
Pantai Kasuari 16,026
Fayit 7,025
Atsy 13,838
Suator 6,453
Akat 5,375
Agats 12,905
Sawa Erma 13,549
Suru-Suru 1,406

However, by 2012 the number of districts had increased to nineteen; the eleven additional districts created in 2011 and 2012 were Kopay, Der Koumur, Safan, Sirets, Ayip, Betcbamu, Kolf Braza, Jetsy, Unir Sirau, Joerat, and Pulau Tiga. In 2016 another four districts were created (Awyu, Aswi, Joutu and Koroway Buluanop), bringing the total to twenty-three districts, comprising 221 administrative villages. The districts are listed below with their areas and their populations at the 2020 Census.[11] The table also includes the locations of the district administrative centres, and the number of administrative villages (rural desa and urban kelurahan) in each district.

District Area
in km2
Population
2020 Census
Admin
centre
No. of
villages
Pantai Kasuari 238.49 5,103 Kamur 9
Kopay 719.71 3,725 Kawem 10
Der Koumur 392.83 4,089 Yankap 6
Safan 685.94 6,976 Primapun 12
Awyu 729.16 2,807 Wagi 6
Fayit 383.29 5,611 Basim 13
Aswi 360.54 3,782 Piramat 10
Atsy 1,260.99 7,065 Atsy 9
Sirets 1,362.07 4,365 Yaosakor 8
Ayip 872.33 2,088 Comoro 3
Bectbamu 475.27 2,816 Youw 7
Suator 949.27 3,209 Binam 10
Kolf Braza 2,660.19 2,779 Binamzain 14
Joutu 736.90 2,149 Daikot 7
Koroway Buluanop 773.71 1,307 Mabul 7
Akat 3,488.42 5,603 Ayam 11
Jetsy 690.49 2,611 Warse 8
Agats 701.99 23,869 Bis Agats 12
Sawa Erma 3,084.51 6,084 Sauti 10
Suru-Suru 2,942.23 4,171 Suru-suru 23
Unir Sirau 1,093.77 3,328 Komor 9
Joerat 1,313.71 2,990 Yamas 6
Pulau Tiga 6,067.63 3,579 Nakai 11
Totals 31,983.44 110,105 Agats 221

VillagesEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2021.
  2. ^ "Visualisasi Data Kependudukan-Kementerian Dalam Negeri 2020". www.dukcapil.kemendagri.go.id. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  3. ^ Biro Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2011.
  4. ^ Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2018.
  5. ^ Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2021.
  6. ^ News, BBC (13 February 2018). "Indonesia's Papua province children starving in a land of gold". British Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  7. ^ Salim, Hanz Jimenez (13 April 2018). "Jokowi Mengaku Kesulitan Pindahkan Penduduk Asmat dari Distrik Terpencil". liputan6.com (in Indonesian). Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  8. ^ Rakhmat, Muhammad Zulfikar; Tarahita, Dikanaya (February 28, 2018). "An Indonesian District Isolated From Development". Asia Sentinel. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  9. ^ TEMPO.CO, Jakarta (February 14, 2018). "Tragedy in Asmat". Tempo.co English Edition. Retrieved 18 March 2019.
  10. ^ Biro Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2011.
  11. ^ Badan Pusat Statistik, Jakarta, 2021.

External linksEdit

  • Statistics publications from Statistics Indonesia (BPS)