BSAT-3a

Summary

BSAT-3a
Mission typeCommunication
OperatorB-SAT
COSPAR ID2007-036B [1]
SATCAT no.32019
WebsiteB-SAT Satellite Fleet
Mission duration13 years (planned)
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftBSAT-3a
BusA2100[2]
ManufacturerLockheed Martin
Launch mass1980 kg
Dry mass927 kg [2]
Dimensions3.8 by 1.9 by 1.9 metres (12.5 ft × 6.2 ft × 6.2 ft)[3]
Power2.8 kW [3]
Start of mission
Launch date14 August 2007, 23:44:07 UTC [1]
RocketAriane 5 ECA (VA-177)
Launch siteCentre Spatial Guyanais, ELA-3
ContractorArianespace
Entered service1 October 2007
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit
RegimeGeostationary orbit
Longitude110.0° East
Transponders
Band8 (plus 4 spares) Ku-band
Coverage areaJapan
TWTA power130 watts
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BSAT-3b →
 

BSAT-3a, is a geostationary communications satellite operated by Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation (B-SAT) which was designed and manufactured by Lockheed Martin on the A2100 platform. It is stationed on the 110,0° East orbital slot with its companion BSAT-3b and BSAT-3c from where they provide redundant high definition direct television broadcasting across Japan.[2][4][5]

History

On 27 April 2005, Lockheed Martin announced that it had been granted by B-SAT an authorisation to proceed to the construction of its first third generation broadcasting satellite, BSAT-3a.[6] On 18 May 2005, both companies announced the signature of the definitive contract for the satellite. It would be based on the A2100 platform, sport eight 130 watts Ku-band transponders (plus 4 spares), have a design life of 13 years and have a 1.8 kW power generation capability. It was expected launch in the second quarter of 2007 to be co-located at the 110.0° East orbital position.[7] On 15 June 2005, Arianespace announced that it had been awarded the launch contract for BSAT-3a.[8]

Satellite description

BSAT-3a was designed and manufactured by Lockheed Martin on the A2100 satellite bus for B-SAT. It had a launch mass of 1,980 kilograms (4,370 lb), a dry mass of 927 kilograms (2,044 lb), and a 13-year design life.[3] As most satellites based on the A2100 platform, it uses a 460 newtons (100 lbf) LEROS-1C LAE for orbit raising.[4]

It measured 3.8 by 1.9 by 1.9 metres (12.5 ft × 6.2 ft × 6.2 ft) when stowed for launch. Its dual wing solar panels can generate 2.8 kW of power at the end of its design life, and span 14.65 metres (48.1 ft) when fully deployed.[3]

It has a single Ku-band payload with 8 active transponders plus four spares with a TWTA output power of 130 watts.[2]

Launch

On 19 June 2007, Lockheed announced that it was poised to deliver BSAT-3a on the third quarter of 2007, with another Japanese spacecraft, JCSAT-11. BSAT-3a was the sixth broadcasting satellite procured by B-SAT.[9]

On 10 August 2007, Lockheed announced that BSAT-3a was mated to the launcher and ready for its ride to orbit.[10] It launched at 23:44 UTC, on 14 August 2007 aboard an Ariane 5 ECA from Centre Spatial Guyanais ELA-3 launch pad.[1] It rode on the lower berth under the SYLDA with Spaceway-3.[11] The first signals from the satellite were received one hour later, at 00:46 UTC on 15 August 2007. It also marked the 33rd launch of the A2100 platform.[12]

It was entered into service on 1 October 2007 after successfully passing the on-orbit deployment and checkout phase.[2][13]

References

  1. ^ a b c "BSAT 3A". NASA. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b c d e "放送衛星3機のスペック" [Specifications of the three broadcasting satellites]. Broadcasting Satellite System Corporation. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d "Launch Kit V-177" (PDF). Arianespace. 7 August 2007. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  4. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter Dirk (17 April 2016). "BSat 3a, 3b". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  5. ^ "BSat 3A". Satbeams. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  6. ^ "B-SAT awards Lockheed Martin Authorisation To Proceed on A2100 small-class satellite". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 27 April 2005. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  7. ^ "B-SAT awards Lockheed Martin contract for A2100 small-class satellite". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 18 May 2005. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  8. ^ "Arianespace Will Launch BSAT-3A for Japan". defense-aerospace.com. Arianespace. 15 June 2005. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  9. ^ "Lockheed Martin Set To Deliver BSAT-3a And JCSAT-11 Spacecraft In 3rd Quarter Of 2007". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 19 June 2007. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  10. ^ "Lockheed Martin-Built BSAT-3a Satellite Ready For Launch". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 10 August 2007. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  11. ^ "Flight 177: Ariane 5 – Satellites: SPACEWAY 3 and BSAT-3A". Airbus. 9 August 2007. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 5 September 2016.
  12. ^ "Lockheed Martin Marks 33rd Consecutive A2100 Success With The Launch Of BSAT-3a Satellite". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 14 August 2007. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  13. ^ "Lockheed Martin-Built BSAT-3a Satellite Begins Service For B-SAT Customers". Icaa.eu. Lockheed Martin Space Systems. 1 October 2007. Archived from the original on 6 September 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.