Bombardier CRJ

Summary

Bombardier CRJ
CRJ Series
Bombardier CRJ-100 Lufthansa D-ACJJ - MSN 7298 - Now in UTair fleet as VQ-BGU (3238726666).jpg
Lufthansa Cityline CRJ-100
Role Regional jet
National origin Canada
Manufacturer Bombardier Aviation
First flight 10 May 1991
Introduction 19 October 1992 with Lufthansa CityLine[1]
Status In service
Primary users SkyWest Airlines
Endeavor Air
PSA Airlines
Air Wisconsin
Produced 1991-2020
Number built 1945 [2]
Developed from Canadair Challenger 600 series
Variants Bombardier CRJ100/200
Bombardier CRJ700 series

The Bombardier CRJ or CRJ Series (for Canadair Regional Jet) is a family of regional jets introduced in 1991 by Bombardier Aerospace. The CRJ was formerly manufactured by Bombardier Aerospace with the manufacturing of the first CRJ generation, the CRJ100/200 (introduced in 1991) and the second CRJ generation, the CRJ700 series (introduced in 1999). The CRJ programme was acquired by Japanese corporation Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI RJ Aviation Group) in a deal that closed 1 June 2020. Bombardier subsequently completed assembly of the order backlog on behalf of Mitsubishi.[2]

Background

Bombardier claims it is the most successful family of regional jets in the world.[3] By October 2018, 1,800 CRJs have been delivered.[4] Production ended in December 2020 after 1,945 were built.[2]

The family consists of the following aircraft generations and models/derivatives:

Divestment

As of November 2018, following Bombardier's decisions to sell the CSeries to Airbus and the Q Series to Viking Air, the company was looking at "strategic options" to return the CRJ to profitability. Analysts suspected that it may decide to exit the commercial aircraft market altogether and refocus on business aircraft.[7][8]

On 25 June 2019, a deal to sell the CRJ programme to Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, the parent company of Mitsubishi Aircraft Corporation which develops the SpaceJet, was announced.[9] Mitsubishi had a historic interest in the CRJ programme, having sounded out risk-sharing options with Bombardier, and were at one point expected to take a stake in the venture during the 1990s.[10][11] Bombardier has stopped taking new sales; production of the CRJ will continue at Mirabel until the current order backlog is complete, with final deliveries expected in the second half of 2020.[12] The deal is to include the type certificate for the CRJ series; Bombardier is working with Transport Canada to separate the CRJ certificate from that of the Challenger.[13]

Closure of the deal was confirmed on 1 June 2020, with Bombardier's service and support activities transferred to a new Montreal-based company, MHI RJ Aviation Group.[14][15] MHI RJ has not renamed the aircraft, and its website refers simply to the CRJ Series.[16][17]

The final Bombardier CRJ to be produced, a CRJ-900, finished production and was delivered to SkyWest Airlines on 28 February 2021.[18]

Specifications

Cimber Air CRJ-200
CRJ-700 (top) and CRJ-900 (bottom)
Air Nostrum CRJ-1000
CRJ Family Characteristics
Variant CRJ-100/200[19] CRJ-700[20] CRJ-900[21] CRJ-1000[22]
Crew Cockpit: 2, Cabin: 1-3
Seating 50 66–78 81–90 97–104
Length 87 ft 10 in / 26.77 m 106 ft 1 in / 32.3 m 118 ft 11 in / 36.2 m 128 ft 5 in / 39.1 m
Height 20 ft 8 in / 6.22 m 24 ft 10 in / 7.6 m 24 ft 7 in / 7.5 m
Wingspan 69 ft 6 in / 21.21 m 76 ft 3 in / 23.2 m 81 ft 7 in / 24.9 m 85 ft 11 in / 26.2 m
Wing Area 520.4 ft² / 48.35 m²[23] 760 ft² / 70.6 m² 765 ft² / 71.1 m² 833 ft² / 77.4 m²
Fuselage diameter 8 ft 10 in / 2.7 m
MTOW 53,000 lb / 24,041 kg (LR) 75 000 lb / 34 019 kg 84 500 lb / 38 330 kg 91 800 lb / 41 640 kg
Operating empty 30,500 lb / 13,835 kg 44,245 lb (20,069 kg) 48,160 lb (21,845 kg) 51,120 lb (23,188 kg)
Max payload 13,500 lb / 6,124 kg 18,055 lb / 8,190 kg 22,590 lb / 10,247 kg (LR) 26,380 lb / 11,966 kg
Max fuel 14,305 lb (6,489 kg) 19,595 lb / 8,888 kg[24][25] 19,450 lb / 8,822 kg[26]
Engines (2x) GE CF34-3A1/3B1 GE CF34-8C5B1 GE CF34-8C5 GE CF34-8C5A1
Takeoff thrust (2x) 8,729 lbf / 38.84 kN[23] 13,790 lbf / 61.3 kN 14,510 lbf / 64.5 kN
Cruise M0.74-0.81, 785–860 km/h (424–464 kn)[27] M0.78-0.825, 447-473 kn, 829-876 km/h
Range 1,650-1,700 nmi / 3,056-3,148 km (LR) 1400 NM / 2593 km 1550 NM / 2871 km 1650 NM / 3056 km
Ceiling 41 000 ft / 12 497 m
Takeoff (MTOW, SL, ISA) LR: 6,290 ft / 1,920 m[23] (LR) 5 265 ft / 1 605 m 5 820 ft / 1 770 m 6 670 ft / 2 030 m
Landing (MLW, SL) 4,850 ft / 1,480 m[27][23] 5 040 ft / 1 540 m 5 360 ft / 1 630 m 5 740 ft / 1 750 m
ICAO type [28] CRJ1 / CRJ2 CRJ7 CRJ9 CRJX

References

  1. ^ "News". Bombardier.
  2. ^ a b c Sylvain Larocque (December 12, 2020). "Une belle page de l'histoire aéronautique québécoise se tourne". Le Journal de Montréal (in French).
  3. ^ "Bombardier CRJ Series Website". Bombardier. April 23, 2019.
  4. ^ Max Kingsley Jones (October 4, 2018). "ANALYSIS: Challenger 600 marks 40 years in business". Flightglobal.
  5. ^ "Bombardier Launches New Innovative 50-Seater Aircraft" (Press release). Bombardier. February 6, 2019.
  6. ^ "More comfort for more customers: 1,600 new premium seats added" (Press release). United Airlines. February 6, 2019.
  7. ^ Hemmerdinger, Jon (November 15, 2018). "ANALYSIS: Q400 rises with Bombardier's transport aircraft retreat". Flightglobal.com. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  8. ^ Bogaisky, Jeremy. "Bombardier Sells Aging Q400 Turboprop Line, Cutting 5,000 Jobs As It Sharpens Focus on Business Jets". Forbes. Retrieved November 15, 2018.
  9. ^ "Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to Acquire Canadair Regional Jet Program from Bombardier Inc" (Press release). Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. June 25, 2019.
  10. ^ Lewis, Peter. "Mitsubishi seeks CRJ-X share." Flight International, 27 April 1996.
  11. ^ "Bombardier gains approval to offer stretched Regional Jet." Flight International, 4 September 1996.
  12. ^ Hemmerdinger, Jon (June 26, 2019). "Bombardier halts CRJ sales amid pending divestiture". Flightglobal.com.
  13. ^ Warwick, Graham (June 27, 2019). "Bombardier Separating CRJ From Challenger Certificate For MHI Sale". aviationweek.com.
  14. ^ "Bombardier Concludes Sale of the CRJ Series Regional Jet Program to Mitsubishi Heavy Industries - Bombardier". www.bombardier.com (Press release). June 1, 2020.
  15. ^ Hemmerdinger, Jon (June 1, 2020). "Mitsubishi closes CRJ acquisition despite SpaceJet uncertainty". Flight Global.
  16. ^ "CRJ Series - Regional Aircraft". mhirj.com. Retrieved September 21, 2020.
  17. ^ "Lufthansa uses Mitsubishi Jets". www.aerotelegraph.com. June 5, 2020. Our product name has not changed. These are still CRJ series aircraft.
  18. ^ Kleps, Kochan (March 1, 2021). "Final Bombardier CRJ Comes off Production Line". Airways Magazine.
  19. ^ "CRJ airport planning manual" (PDF). Bombardier. January 10, 2016.
  20. ^ "CRJ700 Factsheet" (PDF). MHI RJ. 2020.
  21. ^ "CRJ900 Factsheet" (PDF). MHI RJ. 2020.
  22. ^ "CRJ1000 Factsheet" (PDF). MHI RJ. 2020.
  23. ^ a b c d "CRJ200 Fact sheet" (PDF). Bombardier. June 2006.
  24. ^ "CRJ700 Airport Planning Manual" (PDF). Bombardier. December 18, 2013.
  25. ^ "CRJ900 Airport Planning Manual" (PDF). Bombardier. December 17, 2015.
  26. ^ "CRJ1000 Airport Planning Manual" (PDF). Bombardier. December 17, 2015.
  27. ^ a b "CRJ Specifications". Bombardier.
  28. ^ "DOC 8643 - Aircraft Type Designators". ICAO. Retrieved February 7, 2021.

External links

  • Media related to Bombardier CRJ at Wikimedia Commons
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