Bureau of Medicine and Surgery

Summary

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery
Navy Medicine Logo.png
Country United States
Branch United States Navy
TypeMedical
Size63,000
Part ofUnited States Department of the Navy
Commanders
Surgeon General of the NavyRADM Bruce L. Gillingham

The Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) is an agency of the United States Department of the Navy that manages health care activities for the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps. BUMED operates hospitals and other health care facilities as well as laboratories for biomedical research, and trains and manages the Navy's many staff corps related to medicine. Its headquarters is located at the Defense Health Headquarters in Fairfax County, Virginia.[1] BUMED has 63,000 medical personnel and more than a million eligible beneficiaries.[2]

History

BUMED was one of the original five Navy bureaus formed in 1842 to replace the Board of Navy Commissioners. It is one of two bureaus still in existence.[3] BUMED was headquartered at the Old Naval Observatory from 1942 until 2012.[3][4]

In 2005, Navy Medicine aligned its shore facilities into four overarching commands: Navy Medicine East, Navy Medicine West, Navy Medicine National Capital Area, and Navy Medicine Support Command.[5] In 2012, Navy Medicine Support Command was renamed and realigned into the Navy Medicine Education and Training Command, with its non-training units becoming independent under BUMED.[6] Navy Medicine National Capital Area's largest component, the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, was merged in 2011 with Walter Reed Army Medical Center to form the joint Walter Reed National Military Medical Center as a result of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Commission. The merged facility came under the jurisdiction of the new Joint Task Force National Capital Region/Medical, and in 2013, Navy Medicine National Capital Area was disestablished, with its few remaining facilities transferred to Navy Medicine East.[7]

While a 2006 report of the Defense Business Board recommended that the Army, Navy, and Air Force medical commands be merged into a single joint command, citing savings in budget and personnel, this recommendation was not carried out and in 2012 the Defense Health Agency (DHA) was established separately from the military medical commands.[8] All three military medical commands were however all moved to share the new Defense Health Headquarters facility in Falls Church with DHA, again as a result of the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure.[3]

Organization

Departments

The commanding officer of BUMED is the Surgeon General of the United States Navy, a rear admiral. BUMED is divided into ten departments, each referred to with an alphanumerical code. Each of the staff corps is headed by a rear admiral, except for the Hospital Corps, which is headed by a force master chief petty officer because of its status as an enlisted rating. The other department heads are mostly either rear admirals or civilians.[9][10]

  • M00: Corps Chiefs
  • Deputy Chief, Total Force (DCTF)
    • M1: Manpower and Resources
    • M7: Education and Training
  • Deputy Chief, Business Operations (DCBO)
    • Fleet Support & Logistics (M4)
    • Information Management & Technology (M6)
  • Deputy Chief, Resource Management/Comptroller (DCRM/C)
    • Deputy Director, Financial Management (M8)
    • Assistant Deputy Chief, Capabilities Requirements (M9)
  • Deputy Chief, Operations, Plans & Readiness (OP&R)
    • M2: Research and Development
    • M3: Health Care Operations
    • M5: Patient Safety, Clinical Quality & High Reliability/Office of the Chief Medical Officer (M5)

Subordinate commands

Defense Health Headquarters, Falls Church, Virginia
Naval Hospital Naples, Italy

BUMED operates the following facilities and commands:[11]

Naval Medical Forces Atlantic:

Naval Medical Forces Pacific:

Naval Medical Forces Support Command:

Other commands:

Hospital ships:

While the Medical Treatment Facility on each hospital ship is operated by BUMED's medical personnel, the ships themselves are operated by civilian mariners employed by Military Sealift Command.[18][19]

See also

References

  1. ^ "BUMED". U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  2. ^ Furbert, Chentel (1 August 2014). "Navy Surgeon General addresses Navy Medicine's future". The Lemoore Navy News. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  3. ^ a b c "About BUMED". U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Archived from the original on 20 August 2014. Retrieved 19 August 2014.
  4. ^ Pilip-Florea, Shonona (30 May 2012). "Navy Medicine Headquarters Moves to Falls Church, Va". America's Navy. Retrieved 16 May 2014.
  5. ^ "Navy Medicine East Home". Navy Medicine East. Archived from the original on 21 August 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  6. ^ "Navy Medicine Support Command to Reorganize". United States Navy. 5 July 2012. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  7. ^ Little, Bernard S. (8 August 2013). "Navy Medicine National Capital Area Stands Down". DCMilitary.com. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  8. ^ Brewin, Bob (9 March 2012). "Lawmakers Puzzled by New Defense Health Agency". What's Brewin'. Nextgov. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  9. ^ "Navy Medicine Leadership". U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  10. ^ "BUMED Codes". U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Archived from the original on 20 August 2014. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  11. ^ "Navy Medicine Locations". U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Retrieved 20 August 2014.
  12. ^ "Navy Medicine East: Subordinate Commands". Navy Medicine East. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  13. ^ "Navy Medicine West: Commands". Navy Medicine West. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  14. ^ a b c d "Navy Medicine Education and Training Command: Organization". Navy Medicine Education and Training Command. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  15. ^ "NMRC Subordinate Commands". Naval Medical Research Center. Archived from the original on 27 July 2014. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  16. ^ "Fabrication of Eyewear". Navy Medical Logistics Command. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  17. ^ "Navy Drug Screening Labs". Navy and Marine Corps Public Health Center. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  18. ^ "USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) Hospital Ship Fact Sheet" (PDF). Military Sealift Command. Retrieved 21 August 2014.
  19. ^ "Service Support (PM4)". Military Sealift Command. Retrieved 21 August 2014.

9. Navy Medicine Leadership. http://www.navy.mil/navydata/bios/navybio.asp?bioID=602

External links