Cadmium phosphide

Summary

Cadmium phosphide
Names
Other names
Tricadmium diphosphide
Identifiers
  • 12014-28-7
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChemSpider
  • 140173
ECHA InfoCard 100.031.437 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 234-595-5
  • 159393
  • DTXSID401010274
  • InChI=1S/3Cd. 2P/q3*+2;2*-3
    Key: BYWFNUBYQJKAKF-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • [Cd+2].[Cd+2].[Cd+2].[P-3].[P-3]
Properties
Cd3P2
Molar mass 399.178 g/mol
Appearance bluish white[1] or gray[2]
Density 5.96 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 700[1] °C (1,292 °F; 973 K)
Electron mobility 1500 cm2/Vs[1]
3.88[1]
Structure
Tetragonal
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation markGHS08: Health hazardGHS09: Environmental hazard
Warning
H302, H312, H314, H332, H350, H370, H410
P201, P202, P210, P233, P261, P264, P270, P271, P273, P280, P301+P312, P302+P352, P304+P340, P308+P313, P312, P330, P362+P364, P391, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Cadmium phosphide (Cd3P2) is an inorganic chemical compound. It is a grey or white bluish solid semiconductor material with a bandgap of 0.5 eV.[1] It has applications as a pesticide, material for laser diodes and for high-power-high-frequency electronics.[1]

Synthesis and reactions

Cadmium phosphide can be prepared by the reaction of cadmium with phosphorus:

3 Cd + 2 P → Cd3P2

Structure

Cd3P2 has a room-temperature tetragonal form.

The crystalline structure of cadmium phosphide is very similar to that of zinc phosphide (Zn3P2), cadmium arsenide (Cd3As2) and zinc arsenide (Zn3As2). These compounds of the Zn-Cd-P-As quaternary system exhibit full continuous solid-solution.[3]

Applications

Safety

Like other metal phosphides, it is acutely toxic when swallowed due to the formation of phosphine gas when it reacts with gastric acid. It is also carcinogen and dangerous for the skin, eyes and other organs in a large part due to cadmium poisoning.

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Cadmium Phosphide (Cd3P2) Semiconductors". azom.com. 2013-08-19. Retrieved 2020-10-25.
  2. ^ "Cadmium Phosphide Cd3P2". americanelements.com. Retrieved 2020-10-25.
  3. ^ Trukhan, V. M.; Izotov, A. D.; Shoukavaya, T. V. (2014). "Compounds and solid solutions of the Zn-Cd-P-As system in semiconductor electronics". Inorganic Materials. 50 (9): 868–873. doi:10.1134/S0020168514090143. S2CID 94409384.