Charles P. McClelland

Summary

Charles Paul McClelland (December 19, 1854 – June 6, 1944) was a Judge of the United States Customs Court and previously was a Member of the Board of General Appraisers.

Charles P. McClelland
CharlesPMcClelland1893.jpg
Presiding Judge of the United States Customs Court
In office
1934–1939
Preceded byWilliam Josiah Tilson
Succeeded byGeorge Stewart Brown
Judge of the United States Customs Court
In office
May 28, 1926 – September 30, 1939
Appointed byoperation of law
Preceded bySeat established by 44 Stat. 669
Succeeded byWebster Oliver
Member of the Board of General Appraisers
In office
August 21, 1903 – May 28, 1926
Appointed byTheodore Roosevelt
Preceded byJames A. Jewell
Succeeded bySeat abolished
Member of the New York Senate
from the 21st district
In office
January 1, 1903 – August 21, 1903
Preceded byJoseph P. Hennessy
Succeeded byJohn A. Hawkins
Member of the New York Senate
from the 12th district
In office
January 1, 1892 – December 31, 1893
Preceded byWilliam H. Robertson
Succeeded byThomas C. O'Sullivan
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the Westchester County, 1st district
In office
January 1, 1891 – December 31, 1891
Preceded byJ. Irving Burns
Succeeded byThomas K. Fraser
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the Westchester County, 1st district
In office
January 1, 1885 – December 31, 1886
Preceded byNorton P. Otis
Succeeded byJ. Irving Burns
Personal details
Born
Charles Paul McClelland

(1854-12-19)December 19, 1854
Glenluce, Scotland
DiedJune 6, 1944(1944-06-06) (aged 89)
Dobbs Ferry, New York
EducationNew York University School of Law (LL.B.)

Education and careerEdit

Born on December 19, 1854, in Glenluce, Scotland, McClelland received a Bachelor of Laws from New York University School of Law in 1880. He was admitted to the bar the same year, and practiced law in Dobbs Ferry, New York. He was a member of the New York State Assembly (Westchester Co, 1st D.) in 1885 and 1886. He was deputy Collector of the Port of New York from December 1886 to March 1890. He was again a member of the State Assembly in 1891. He was a member of the New York State Senate (12th D.) in 1892, 1893 and 1903.[1]

Federal judicial serviceEdit

McClelland received a recess appointment from President Theodore Roosevelt on August 21, 1903, to a seat on the Board of General Appraisers vacated by Member James A. Jewell. He was nominated to the same position by President Roosevelt on November 10, 1903. He was confirmed by the United States Senate on December 7, 1903, and received his commission on December 8, 1903. McClelland was reassigned by operation of law to the United States Customs Court on May 28, 1926, to a new Associate Justice (Judge from June 17, 1930) seat authorized by 44 Stat. 669. He served as Presiding Judge from 1934 to 1939. His service terminated on September 30, 1939, due to his retirement. He was succeeded by Judge Webster Oliver.[1]

DeathEdit

McClelland died on June 6, 1944, in Dobbs Ferry.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "McClelland, Charles Paul - Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.

External linksEdit

  • The New York Red Book compiled by Edgar L. Murlin (published by James B. Lyon, Albany NY, 1897; pg. 404, 504f and 509)
  • Biographical sketches of the members of the Legislature in The Evening Journal Almanac (1892)
  • New York State Legislative Souvenir for 1893 with Portraits of the Members of Both Houses by Henry P. Phelps (pg. 14)
New York State Assembly
Preceded by New York State Assembly Westchester County, 1st District
1885–1886
Succeeded by
Preceded by New York State Assembly Westchester County, 1st District
1891
Succeeded by
New York State Senate
Preceded by New York State Senate 12th District
1892–1893
Succeeded by
Preceded by
Joseph P. Hennessy
New York State Senate 21st District
1903
Succeeded by
Legal offices
Preceded by Member of the Board of General Appraisers
1903–1926
Succeeded by
Seat abolished
Preceded by
Seat established by 44 Stat. 669
Judge of the United States Customs Court
1926–1939
Succeeded by
Preceded by Presiding Judge of the United States Customs Court
1934–1939
Succeeded by