Chief Cabinet Secretary

Summary

The Chief Cabinet Secretary of Japan (内閣官房長官, Naikaku-kanbō-chōkan) is a member of the cabinet and is the leader and chief executive of the Cabinet Secretariat of Japan.[1] The Chief Cabinet Secretary coordinates the policies of ministries and agencies in the executive branch,[2] and also serves as the government's press secretary. The secretary is a statutory member of the National Security Council, and is appointed by the Emperor upon the nomination by the Prime Minister.[3] The Chief Cabinet Secretary is the first in line of succession to the Prime Minister, unless the office of the Deputy Prime Minister is occupied.[4]

Chief Cabinet Secretary of Japan
内閣官房長官
Naikaku-kanbō-chōkan
Goshichi no kiri.svg
Emblem of the Government of Japan
Hirokazu Matsuno.jpg
Incumbent
Hirokazu Matsuno
since 4 October 2021
Cabinet Secretariat
StyleMr. Secretary
Member ofCabinet
National Security Council
Reports toThe Prime Minister
AppointerThe Prime Minister
attested to by the Emperor
Term lengthNo fixed term
PrecursorSecretary-General of the Cabinet
Inaugural holderFumio Kyuma
Formation3 May 1947; 75 years ago (1947-05-03)
SuccessionSecond
DeputyDeputy Chief Cabinet Secretary
Salary¥20,916,000
Websitehttp://www.cas.go.jp/

In March 1879, the precursor of the position, the Secretary-General of the Cabinet, was created. From 1885, it was included as part of the cabinet system, and the position was known in Japanese as 内閣書記官長 (naikaku-shokikan-chō). The modern position was created on May 3, 1947, shortly after the passage of the Constitution of Japan, and elevated to ministerial status in 1966.

Since 1947, the office of Chief Cabinet Secretary has been regarded as a stepping stone to the post of Prime Minister. The first Chief Cabinet Secretary to become Prime Minister was Ichirō Hatoyama, who served in the position under Tanaka Giichi. Since then, eight other former Chief Cabinet Secretaries have become Prime Ministers, most recently Shinzō Abe, Yasuo Fukuda, and Yoshihide Suga.

Yoshihide Suga, who later became Prime Minister of Japan, served as Chief Cabinet Secretary under Shinzo Abe for nearly eight years, making him the longest-serving Chief Cabinet Secretary in history, having overtaken the previous record of 1,289 days in office set by Fukuda on July 7, 2016.[5]

The current Chief Cabinet Secretary is Hirokazu Matsuno, who took office on 4 October 2021.

The Cabinet Office Building is where the Cabinet Secretariat resides.

List of Secretary-Generals of the CabinetEdit

Shōwa EraEdit

  • Tsukamoto Kiyoji (December 25, 1926 – April 20, 1927)
  • Ichirō Hatoyama (April 20, 1927 – July 2, 1929) - later became prime minister in the mid-1950s.
  • 6 other holders (July 3, 1929 – October 19, 1934)
  • Shigeru Yoshida (October 20, 1934 – May 11, 1935) - not to be confused with PM Shigeru Yoshida.
  • 14 other holders (May 12, 1935 – April 6, 1945)
  • Hisatsune Sakomizu (7 April 1945 – 15 August 1945)
  • vacant (August 16, 1945 – October 9, 1945)
  • Daizaburō Tsugita (October 9, 1945 – January 13, 1946)
  • Wataru Narahashi (January 13, 1946 – May 22, 1946)
  • Jyōji Hayashi (May 22, 1946 – May 2, 1947)

List of Chief Cabinet SecretariesEdit

Shōwa EraEdit

  Liberal (1945)
  Socialist
  Democratic (1947)
  Democratic Liberal
  Liberal (1950)
  Democratic (1954)
  Liberal Democratic

Chief Cabinet Secretary Term of office Prime Minister
Portrait Name Took Office Left Office Days
  Jōji Hayashi May 3, 1947 May 24, 1947 21 Shigeru Yoshida
  Suehiro Nishio June 1, 1947 March 10, 1948 283 Tetsu Katayama
  Gizō Tomabechi March 10, 1948 October 15, 1948 219 Hitoshi Ashida
  Eisaku Satō[n 1] October 17, 1948 February 16, 1949 122 Shigeru Yoshida
  Kaneshichi Masuda February 16, 1949 May 6, 1950 444
  Katsuo Okazaki May 6, 1950 December 26, 1951 599
  Shigeru Hori December 26, 1951 October 30, 1952 309
  Taketora Ogata October 30, 1952 May 21, 1953 203
  Kenji Fukunaga May 21, 1953 December 10, 1954 568
  Ryutarō Nemoto December 10, 1954 November 22, 1955 744 Ichirō Hatoyama
November 22, 1955 December 23, 1956
  Hirohide Ishida December 12, 1956 July 10, 1957 210 Tanzan Ishibashi
Nobusuke Kishi
  Kiichi Aichi July 10, 1957 June 12, 1958 337
  Munenori Akagi June 12, 1958 June 18, 1959 371
  Etsusaburō Shiina June 18, 1959 July 19, 1960 397
  Masayoshi Ōhira[n 2] July 19, 1960 July 18, 1962 729 Hayato Ikeda
  Yasumi Kurogane July 18, 1962 July 18, 1964 731
  Zenkō Suzuki[n 3] July 18, 1964 November 9, 1964 114
  Tomisaburō Hashimoto November 9, 1964 August 1, 1966 630 Eisaku Satō
  Kiichi Aichi August 1, 1966 December 3, 1966 124
  Kenji Fukunaga December 3, 1966 June 22, 1967 201
  Toshio Kimura June 22, 1967 November 30, 1968 527
  Shigeru Hori November 30, 1968 July 5, 1971 947
  Noboru Takeshita[n 4] July 5, 1971 July 7, 1972 368
  Susumu Nikaidō July 7, 1972 November 11, 1974 857 Kakuei Tanaka
  Noboru Takeshita[n 4] November 11, 1974 December 9, 1974 28
  Ichitarō Ide December 9, 1974 December 24, 1976 746 Takeo Miki
  Sunao Sonoda December 24, 1976 November 28, 1977 339 Takeo Fukuda
  Shintaro Abe November 28, 1977 December 7, 1978 374
  Rokusuke Tanaka December 7, 1978 November 9, 1979 337 Masayoshi Ōhira
  Masayoshi Ito[n 5] November 9, 1979 July 17, 1980 251
Himself (Acting)
  Kiichi Miyazawa[n 6] July 17, 1980 November 27, 1982 863 Zenkō Suzuki
  Masaharu Gotōda November 27, 1982 December 27, 1983 395 Yasuhiro Nakasone
  Takao Fujinami December 27, 1983 December 28, 1985 732
  Masaharu Gotōda December 28, 1985 November 6, 1987 678
  Keizō Obuchi[n 7] November 6, 1987 January 7, 1989 428 Noboru Takeshita

Heisei EraEdit

  Liberal Democratic
  Japan New Party
  New Party Sakigake
  Japan Renewal Party
  Socialist
  Democratic

Chief Cabinet Secretary Term of office Prime Minister
Portrait Name Took Office Left Office Days
  Keizō Obuchi[n 7] January 8, 1989 June 3, 1989 147 Noboru Takeshita
  Masajuro Shiokawa June 3, 1989 August 10, 1989 68 Sōsuke Uno
  Tokuo Yamashita August 10, 1989 August 26, 1989 16 Toshiki Kaifu
  Mayumi Moriyama August 26, 1989 February 28, 1990 186
  Misoji Sakamoto February 28, 1990 November 5, 1991 615
  Koichi Kato November 5, 1991 December 12, 1992 403 Kiichi Miyazawa
  Yōhei Kōno December 12, 1992 August 9, 1993 240
  Masayoshi Takemura August 9, 1993 April 28, 1994 262 Morihiro Hosokawa
  Hiroshi Kumagai April 28, 1994 June 30, 1994 63 Tsutomu Hata
  Kozo Igarashi June 30, 1994 August 8, 1995 404 Tomiichi Murayama
  Koken Nosaka August 8, 1995 January 11, 1996 156
  Seiroku Kajiyama January 11, 1996 September 11, 1997 609 Ryutaro Hashimoto
  Kanezo Muraoka September 11, 1997 July 30, 1998 322
  Hiromu Nonaka July 30, 1998 October 10, 1999 432 Keizo Obuchi
  Mikio Aoki October 10, 1999 July 4, 2000 273
Yoshiro Mori
  Hidenao Nakagawa July 4, 2000 October 27, 2000 115
  Yasuo Fukuda[n 8] October 27, 2000 May 7, 2004 1380
Junichiro Koizumi
  Hiroyuki Hosoda May 7, 2004 October 31, 2005 450
  Shinzo Abe[n 9] October 31, 2005 September 26, 2006 330
  Yasuhisa Shiozaki September 26, 2006 August 27, 2007 335 Shinzo Abe
  Kaoru Yosano August 27, 2007 September 26, 2007 30
  Nobutaka Machimura September 26, 2007 September 24, 2008 364 Yasuo Fukuda
  Takeo Kawamura September 24, 2008 September 16, 2009 357 Taro Aso
  Hirofumi Hirano September 16, 2009 June 8, 2010 265 Yukio Hatoyama
  Yoshito Sengoku June 8, 2010 January 4, 2011 210 Naoto Kan
  Yukio Edano January 4, 2011 September 2, 2011 241
  Osamu Fujimura September 2, 2011 December 26, 2012 481 Yoshihiko Noda
  Yoshihide Suga[n 10] December 26, 2012 April 30, 2019 2316 Shinzo Abe

Reiwa EraEdit

  Liberal Democratic

Chief Cabinet Secretary Term of office Prime Minister
Portrait Name Took Office Left Office Days
  Yoshihide Suga[n 10] May 1, 2019 September 16, 2020 504 Shinzo Abe
  Katsunobu Katō September 16, 2020 October 4, 2021 383 Yoshihide Suga
  Hirokazu Matsuno October 4, 2021 Incumbent 489 Fumio Kishida

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 1964-72
  2. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 1978-80
  3. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 1980-82
  4. ^ a b Later served as Prime Minister 1987-89
  5. ^ Served as Acting Prime Minister on the death of Ōhira, 12 June - 17 July 1980
  6. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 1991-93
  7. ^ a b Later served as Prime Minister 1998-2000
  8. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 2007-08.
  9. ^ Later served as Prime Minister 2006-07, 2012-20
  10. ^ a b Later served as Prime Minister 2020-21

ReferencesEdit

Footnotes
  1. ^ Cabinet Act, Article 13.
  2. ^ Cabinet Act, Article 12, Paragraph 2, Item 4 and 5
  3. ^ Cabinet Act, Article 15
  4. ^ Cabinet Act, Article 9
  5. ^ "Government strongman Suga set to become Japan's longest-serving chief Cabinet secretary". Japan Times. Jiji Press. Retrieved 3 December 2016.
Notes