China Aerospace International Holdings

Summary

China Aerospace International Holdings
CASIL
Formerly
Conic Investment Co., Ltd.
public company
Traded asSEHK: 31
Industry
  • conglomerate
  • electronic
  • real estate development
PredecessorChee Yuen Industrial
Founded25 July 1975; 45 years ago (1975-07-25)
FounderAlex Au
HeadquartersHung Hom,
Kowloon
,
Hong Kong
Key people
Gong Bo(non-executive chairman)
Li Hongjun(president & director)
Jin Xuesheng(vice-president & director)
Products
  • electronic goods
  • CRT television (discontinued)
BrandsContec (discontinued)
RevenueIncrease HK$03.088 billion (2016)
Decrease HK$00796 million (2016)
Total assetsIncrease HK$12.785 billion (2016)
Total equityIncrease HK$06.190 billion (2016)
ParentChina Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese中國航天國際控股有限公司
Simplified Chinese中国航天国际控股有限公司
Literal meaningChina Aerospace International Holdings Limited Company
Chinese short name
Traditional Chinese航天控股
Simplified Chinese航天控股
former Chinese name
Traditional Chinese康力投資
Simplified Chinese康力投资
Literal meaningConic Investment
Websitecasil-group.com
Footnotes / references
in consolidated financial statement[1]

China Aerospace International Holdings Limited (abb. CASIL) is a Hong Kong incorporated holding company. The company itself is a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation and a listed company on the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong. It is a red chip company,[2] but not part of the "red chip index" of the stock exchange.

The holding company in the past was involved in electronic goods as well as their plastic components; since acquired by stated-owned China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation, according to the company, it became a conglomerate that involved in manufacturing and sale of hi-tech products, as well as property investment.[3]

History

Conic Investment

China Aerospace International Holdings Ltd. was previously known as Conic Investment Co., Ltd. (Chinese: 康力投資有限公司). It was incorporated on 25 July 1975 in British Hong Kong.[4] It was acted as the holding company of Conic Group (Chinese: 康力集團; Jyutping: hong1 lik6 zaap6 tyun4), which including Cony Electronic Products (Chinese: 康力電子製品, incorporated in 1973[4]),[5]:34–35 Chee Yuen Industrial Company (incorporated in 1969[4] and was majority owned by Alex Au[6]),[5]:34–35 Far East United Electronics (incorporated in 1970[4]),[5]:34–35 Grand Precision Works,[5]:34–35 Jeckson Electric Company,[5]:34–35 Hong Yuen Electronics,[5]:34–35 Soundic Electronics,[5]:34–35 as well as other electronic and plastic manufacturers.[5]:34–35 Conic Investment also owned the brand Contec (Chinese: 康藝).[7]

[the larger] Conic Group also had a film production company, Conic Film Productions Limited (Chinese: 康力電影製作有限公司) that was incorporated in October 1979.[4] 康力電影 [sic] signed a contract to publish the album of Sam Hui in 1984.[8] The audio department of the [larger] Conic Group, which publish albums for aforementioned Sam Hui, as well as Michael Kwan and Paula Tsui, was operated by Contec Sound Media Limited (Chinese: 康藝成音有限公司, incorporated in April 1981) according to other news report.[9][10] The larger Conic Group also had a TV studio called Conic TV Studio,[5] which was now known as Centro TV (Chinese: 先濤電視企業), a predecessor of Centro Digital Pictures. Conic TV was led by Robert Chua and John Chu (Chinese: 朱家欣); Chu later bought the company from [the larger] Conic Group.[11] A sister company, Conic Video Club, was opened in 1982.[12]

In 1980, Conic Investment was already one of the largest electronic manufacturer in Hong Kong.[13] In November 1980, Conic Investment signed a land lease with a government-owned corporation, Hong Kong Industrial Estates Corporation, in order to open a CRT television factory in the Tai Po Industrial Estate.[13] Conic Investment also invested in the mainland China shortly after the marketisation, which a Sino-foreign joint venture repairing factory in Fuzhou, for Conic and Contec branded products, was opened in April 1980.[14]

It became a listed company on the Hong Kong stock exchange on 25 August 1981.[2][15] The listed company received half of the former Conic Group, while some of the former subsidiaries remained private, under another holding company Honic Holdings (Chinese: 雄力集團; Jyutping: hung4 lik6 zaap6 tyun4),[16]:138 which was incorporated on 18 December 1979.[4] Conic TV, Conic Film Productions, Contec Sound Media, Conic Video Club, Grand Precision Works, Soundic Electronics, as well as Conic Semiconductor, etc. were remained private.[7]

In 1983, Conic Investment purchased Conic Investment Building[nb 1] from the developer Cheung Kong Holdings, by paying HK$53.3 million cash and issuing new shares worth HK$56.7 million (HK$2.1 per share) to Cheung Kong, that equal to 7.2% of the original share capital according to news report.[7][17][18] The building became the headquarter of Conic Investment.[19] In February 1983, Conic Semiconductor, was acquired from Honic, the unlisted portion of the larger Conic Group, for HK$55 million cash.[7][20] The subsidiary was the largest producer of liquid-crystal display panel in Hong Kong according to the narrative of the company.[7][20]

However, in 1982, [sic][16]:138 in order to cover a financial loss,[nb 2] Alex Au (Au Yan Din; Chinese: 柯俊文; Jyutping: o1 zeon3 man4), chairman and the majority shareholder of Conic Investment at that time, invited Chinese state-owned enterprise (SOE) China Resources to subscribe a capital increase of the company (which an agreement was signed in January 1984 for 100 million number of new shares for HK$1 each[19]), via a subsidiary Sin King Enterprises Company Limited (Chinese: 新瓊企業有限公司),[16]:138[23] as well as purchase 80 million number of shares from Au.[19][23] After the completion of the capital increase, China Resources and Bank of China Group (at that time as unincorporated group of companies) became the controlling shareholder in 1984 for 35% ordinary shares via Sin King.[16]:139[19][24][25][26][nb 3] Conic at that time declared that the company did not faced any difficulties, thus the takeover was not related to the situation of the company.[23] However, Alex Au and 5 other directors were resigned[26] and replaced by directors that were nominated by Sin King shortly after the takeover.[30] A scandal that involves false accounting as well as illegal withdrew of the capital of the listed company was also reveal in 1984–85, with 2 of the resigned directors Tam Chun Shing (Chinese: 譚頌聲) and Lam Chun Kiu (Chinese: 林中翹), as well as 7 managers were arrested.[31] It was also reported that Alex Au was fled to Taiwan in 1984,[32] who refused to refurbish the loan of Honic from Conic.[33][34] Au also involved in a kidnapping crime in 1985 which he was reportly kidnapped his new business partner.[32][35] Lam Chun Kiu later also founded his own electronics company, including a joint venture that now known as Konka Group (Chinese: 康佳集团).[36]

Since then, Conic Investment was shifted its focus to the mainland China under the new owner.[37] Sin King also attempted to privatise and delist the company in 1987. However, the plan was abandoned in the same year.[38] It was revealed that the company had a heavy net loss in 1986 financial year.[39]

China Aerospace International Holdings

In 1993 Conic Investment was acquired by fellow SOE China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) as a backdoor listing, renaming to China Aerospace International Holdings Limited (Chinese: 航天科技國際集團有限公司).[4] The English name of the company was remained unchanged since 1993, but the Chinese name had changed to the current one in 2008.[4] Some of the subsidiaries of former Conic Investment remained intact as live subsidiaries, although the economic transformation of Hong Kong had made most of the factories of the group were shifted to mainland China.

The company was headed by Lt. Col. Liu Chaoying (刘超英) in the late 1990s, the daughter of Liu Huaqing (刘华清).[citation needed]

In 2000, the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong publicly criticised four (former) directors of CASIL for not disclosing related-parties deals of CASIL and CASC properly,[40] as well as disclosing the deals with XCOM Multimedia Communications, a company that owned a stake in CASIL's joint venture CXSAT.[40] XCOM Multimedia Communications and CXSAT were makers of digital satellite receiver decoder.[40]

In 2005, the company sold the former headquarter Conic Investment Building which was located in Hung Hom to Global Coin Limited, a subsidiary Cheung Kong Holdings, for HK$330 million.[41][42][43]

The company also owned 14.29% shares of APT Satellite International (via a subsidiary CASIL Satellite), the parent company of listed company APT Satellite Holdings, the operator Apstar satellites. CASIL Satellite was sold to CASIL's parent company CASC in 2011 for HK$132.3 million.[44]

In 2014, Li Guolei, a director of CASIL's subsidiary China Aerospace Industrial Limited, committed suicide by jumping off from China Aerospace Centre, Kwun Tong. According to his wife, he was under investigation for corruption by mainland Chinese authorities.[45]

CASIL had a joint venture, Hainan Aerospace Investment Management (Chinese: 海南航天投资管理), which was a developer of the complex zone of Wenchang Spacecraft Launch Site. However, the joint venture withdrew from the development in 2016.[1] It was reported the complex would be developed into a theme park.[46]

Subsidiaries

As of 31 December 2016

Joint ventures

former
  • Xiamen Overseas Chinese Electronic Company [(Chinese: 厦门华侨电子)] (50%)[19]

Shareholders

As of 31 December 2016[1]:43

Rank Name Chinese name Percentage Footnotes
1 China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation 中国航天科技集团公司 38.37%

See also

  • China Healthcare Enterprise Group [zh], former known as Telefield International (Holdings), a former electronic company that was founded by a former employee of Conic Investment, Cheng Han Ngok (Steve Cheng; Chinese: 鄭衡嶽)
  • APT Satellite Holdings, sister company in Hong Kong
  • China Energine, sister company in Hong Kong

Further reading

  • Atari Incorporated and others v. Soundic Electronics Ltd and others (case law)
  • 沁雨 (3 July 1984) [digitalised in 2010s]. "Yī yì yuán de "xué fèi"" 一亿元的「学费」 [100 million "tuition fee"]. Lian He Wan Bao (in Chinese). Singapore Press Holdings. p. 13. Retrieved 6 May 2018 – via Singapore National Library.
  • Carr, Jennifer L., ed. (1990). Major Companies of The Far East and Australasia 1990/91: Volume 2: East Asia. Major Companies of the Far East and Australasia. Graham & Trotman. p. 35. ISBN 978-94-010-6850-5. ISSN 0961-3234.
  • Carr, Jennifer L., ed. (1991). Major Companies of The Far East and Australasia 1991/92: Volume 2: East Asia. Major Companies of the Far East and Australasia. Graham & Trotman. p. 35. ISBN 1-85333-605-X. ISSN 0961-3234.

Footnotes

  1. ^ Known as Sun Hing Commercial and Industrial Building (Chinese: 新興工商業大廈) at that time.[7] Not to be confused with the namesake in Tuen Mun.
  2. ^ According to a book, quoting Gerald "Jerry" Garies' narrative, a former manager of the group, the capital increase was a consequence of a financial loss that was reported to the annual board meeting,[16] however, it was contradicted by the narrative of the listed company which presented to the public and the press in the 1983 annual general meeting that the net profit of 1982 financial year was HK$32.6 million, excluding extraordinary items.[7][21][22] Nevertheless, an accounting scandal was later discovered by the auditor, regarding 1983 Interim Report[19] which was followed up by the police; under the new board of directors, the annual general meeting approved the 1983 Annual Report on 31 August 1984, which the net loss (excluding extraordinary item) of that year was HK$262.7 million, mainly due to a HK$217 million provision on a bad loan that was lent from Conic to Alex Au controlled Honic and its subsidiaries.[19]
  3. ^ Despite it was reported that Bank of China Group owned 50% joint venture via its member bank and insurance company,[23] according to "1984 Annual Return" of Sin King Enterprises to Hong Kong Companies Registry, the company was owned by Commotra and Feng Ming Investment (Chinese: 豐民投資) in a 50–50 ratio.[4] The former was owned by China Resources[27] and the latter, a company with a licence as a money lender,[28] was owned by various shareholders (13 individuals and 3 companies), according to their filings "Return of Allotments on 14 November 1983" and "1986 Annual Return" to the registry.[4] Those individuals were the managers of the member banks of the Bank of China Group. The largest shareholder of Feng Ming Investment was Mellow Trading Limited for 25% shares.[4] Both Feng Ming and Mellow were headquartered in Bank of China Building, while Sin King was headquartered in China Resources Building. At some time later, Feng Ming Investment formally became a wholly owned direct subsidiary of Bank of China Group Investment Limited,[29]:1–1–38 in turn, Bank of China Group Investment Limited was another indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of China;[29] Bank of China Group Investment Limited was incorporated on 11 December 1984 as China Development Investment (Hong Kong) (renamed in 1993).[4][29]:1–1–32

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "2016 Annual Report" (PDF). China Aerospace International Holdings. 27 April 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2017 – via Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing Limited website.
  2. ^ a b 中資紅籌股公司名單 (主板) (in Chinese). Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing. 30 June 2017. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  3. ^ "Company Profile". Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing. Retrieved 5 May 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Filings in Hong Kong Companies Registry
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i Conic TV: A New Force in Commercial TV Production in Hong Kong (PDF). Conic TV Studio. July 1977. Retrieved 6 May 2018 – via printed by South China Morning Post, digitalized and republished by robertchua.com.
  6. ^ "State Dept cable 1975-60264". United States Department of State. 17 December 1975 [Declassified in 2006]. Retrieved 8 May 2018 – via archive.org.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Conic Investment Company Limited 1982 Annual Report. Cyber Search Centre (statutory filing). Hong Kong: Companies Registry. July 1983 [digitalized circa 2000s].
  8. ^ 片商兴风作浪《女皇密令》迎击《铁板烧》. Lian He Wan Bao (in Chinese). Singapore Press Holdings. 4 February 1984 [digitalized circa 2010s]. p. 16. Retrieved 5 May 2018 – via Singapore National Library.
  9. ^ 新藝城與德寶爭相邀簽約許冠傑左右做人難. Chinese Express Daily News (in Chinese). Toronto. 13 June 1985 [digitalized circa 2010s]. p. 13 – via Simon Fraser University Library.
  10. ^ 翟浩然 (6 October 2012). 不惜工本劃空而過 三巨星匯聚康藝成音. Ming Pao Weekly (in Chinese). No. 2291. Hong Kong: Media Chinese International.
  11. ^ 李雪廬 (2010). "電視業帶動廣告業". 李雪廬回憶錄 (in Chinese). Joint Publishing (Hong Kong). p. 218. ISBN 9789620429231. Retrieved 6 May 2018 – via Google Book Preview.
  12. ^ Ebert, Hans (16 October 1982). "Hope in Hong Kong". Billboard. pp. 16, 39. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  13. ^ a b 電子業康力投資公司已簽約大埔工業邨. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 19 November 1980. p. 17 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  14. ^ 康藝牌高級收音錄音機福州維修站開幕. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 25 April 1980. p. 14 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  15. ^ 康力投資招收新股今起接受申請認購八月六日中午截止收件. Ta Kung Pao (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 31 July 1981. p. 9 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  16. ^ a b c d e Castellano, Joseph (2005). "An Industry in Transition". Liquid Gold: The Story of Liquid Crystal Displays and the Creation of an Industry. World Scientific. ISBN 981-238-956-3 – via Google Book Preview.
  17. ^ 長實出售工厦獲得康力新股. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 31 March 1983. p. 7 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  18. ^ 康力斥資億餘元購長實名下廠厦. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 3 May 1983. p. 6 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Conic Investment Company Limited 1983 Annual Report. Cyber Search Centre (statutory filing). Hong Kong: Companies Registry. December 1984 [digitalized circa 2000s].
  20. ^ a b 康力新產品面世有助收益現價位已高再上升比較難. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 21 June 1983. p. 7 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  21. ^ 康力純利下降今年接單增加. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 12 May 1983. p. 6 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  22. ^ 康力投資主席柯俊文表示發展目標轉向高技術電子產品. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 28 June 1983. p. 24 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  23. ^ a b c d 新瓊購康力投資非公司出現困難. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 22 January 1984. p. 7 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  24. ^ "China Report ECONOMIC AFFAIRS". Foreign Broadcast Information Service. 18 July 1985. p. 131. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  25. ^ 郭, 國燦 (2009). 香港中資財團 (in Chinese). Joint Publishing (Hong Kong). p. 220. ISBN 9789620428869.
  26. ^ a b 康力投資七位董事先後辭職. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 22 June 1984. p. 7 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  27. ^ https://webb-site.com/dbpub/orgdata.asp?p=186531
  28. ^ "List of Expired Money Lenders Licences (as at 30 June 2017)" (PDF). Hong Kong Companies Registry. 6 July 2017. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  29. ^ a b c 公开发行20,000万股A股路演公告 (PDF) (in Chinese). Shanghai Airlines. 16 September 2002. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 January 2005. Retrieved 21 July 2017 – via cninfo.com.cn.
  30. ^ 康力投資委新主席. The Kung Sheung Evening News (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Industrial and Commercial Daily Press. 21 September 1984. p. 7 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  31. ^ 康力投資前九名職員分別被控六十三項罪. Ta Kung Pao (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 20 November 1985. p. 8 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  32. ^ a b 地產商人被綁架案台警方找尋柯俊文. Ta Kung Pao (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 9 August 1985. p. 4 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  33. ^ 柯俊文被扣留. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 10 August 1985. p. 9 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  34. ^ 林保華. 香港回憶錄之「中英談判」. 看雜誌 (in Chinese). No. 180 – via inmediahk.net.
  35. ^ 涉買兇綁架男子 台灣緝港商柯俊文. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 9 August 1985. p. 9 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  36. ^ 急流勇退的香港电视机大王林中翘. 华人世界 (in Chinese). China Central Television. 19 May 2014. Retrieved 6 May 2018.
  37. ^ Castellano, Joseph (2005). "An Industry in Transition". Liquid Gold: The Story of Liquid Crystal Displays and the Creation of an Industry. World Scientific. p. 139. ISBN 981-238-956-3. Retrieved 5 May 2018 – via Google Book Preview. By 1987, a new director from Sin King was appointed to the board of Conic Semiconductor and it soon became clear that the intent was to move much of Conic Semiconductor's operations into Mainland China
  38. ^ 康力投資股份復牌. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 27 October 1987. p. 19 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  39. ^ 康力投資去年度虧損一億八千萬. Wah Kiu Yat Po (in Chinese). Hong Kong. 23 June 1987. p. 18 – via Hong Kong Public Libraries MMIS.
  40. ^ a b c "PUBLIC STATEMENT" (Press release). Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 15 August 2000. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  41. ^ "MAJOR TRANSACTION: DISPOSAL OF PROPERTY AND NOTICE OF EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL MEETING" (PDF) (Press release). China Aerospace International Holdings. 13 June 2005. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  42. ^ 航天科技售樓料賺1.4億. Sing Tao Daily (in Chinese). 9 May 2005. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  43. ^ "THE CHAIRMAN'S STATEMENT FOR 2014 HIGHLIGHTS" (PDF). Cheung Kong Holdings. 26 February 2015. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  44. ^ a b "ANNOUNCEMENT: CONNECTED TRANSACTION IN RESPECT OF THE DISPOSAL OF THE ENTIRE ISSUED SHARE CAPITAL OF CASIL SATELLITE HOLDINGS LIMITED" (PDF). China Aerospace International Holdings. 28 March 2011. Retrieved 25 July 2017.
  45. ^ "Director of Chinese aerospace company leaps to his death in Hong Kong". South China Morning Post. Hong Kong. 23 May 2014. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  46. ^ "China's first aerospace themed park to locate in Wenchang, Hainan". tradingmarkets. 7 June 2010. Archived from the original on 3 January 2018. Retrieved 19 July 2017 – via whatsonsanya.com.
  47. ^ http://www.casilsemi.com
  48. ^ http://www.casil-cheeyuen.com
  49. ^ http://www.casil-jeckson.com
  50. ^ http://www.hongyuen.com

External links

  • Official website (in Chinese)