Cleitor (mythology)

Summary

In Greek mythology, Cleitor or Clitor (Ancient Greek: Κλείτωρ) or Kleitor (Κλήτωρ) may refer to the following personages:

  • Cleitor, an Arcadian prince as one of the 50 sons of the impious King Lycaon either by the naiad Cyllene,[1] Nonacris[2] or by unknown woman. He and his brothers were the most nefarious and carefree of all people. To test them, Zeus visited them in the form of a peasant. These brothers mixed the entrails of a child into the god's meal, whereupon the enraged Zeus threw the meal over the table. Cleitor was killed, along with his brothers and their father, by a lightning bolt of the god.[3]
  • Cleitor, Cletor or Cleitos, the father of Eurymedousa, mother of Myrmidon by Zeus.[4]
  • Cleitor, in his time, the most powerful of the kings in Arcadia. He was the son of King Azan of Azania[5] but he was childless, therefore he was succeeded by his own cousin, Aepytus, the son of Elatus. Cleitor dwelt in Lycosura and founded a town that bears its name (Cleitor).[6]

Notes

  1. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitates Romanae 1.13.1
  2. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.17.6
  3. ^ Apollodorus, 3.8.1
  4. ^ Clement of Alexandria, Protrepticus 2. p.41 (p. 34)
  5. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.4.4, 8.21.3.
  6. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.4.5

References

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Dionysus of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities. English translation by Earnest Cary in the Loeb Classical Library, 7 volumes. Harvard University Press, 1937-1950. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
  • Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitatum Romanarum quae supersunt, Vol I-IV. . Karl Jacoby. In Aedibus B.G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1885. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.


This article includes a list of Greek mythological figures with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific Greek mythology article referred you to this page, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended Greek mythology article, if one exists.