Clupeiformes

Summary

Clupeiformes
Temporal range: Late Jurassic to present
Herring2.jpg
Atlantic herring, Clupea harengus
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Cohort: Otocephala
Superorder: Clupeomorpha
Order: Clupeiformes
Goodrich, 1909
Type species
Clupea harengus
Families

See text

Clupeiformes /ˈklpɪfɔːrmz/ is the order of ray-finned fish that includes the herring family, Clupeidae, and the anchovy family, Engraulidae. The group includes many of the most important forage and food fish.

Clupeiformes are physostomes, which means that their gas bladder has a pneumatic duct connecting it to the gut. They typically lack a lateral line, but still have the eyes, fins and scales that are common to most fish, though not all fish have these attributes. They are generally silvery fish with streamlined, spindle-shaped, bodies, and they often school. Most species eat plankton which they filter from the water with their gill rakers.[1]

The former order of Isospondyli was subsumed mostly by Clupeiformes,[2] but some isospondylous fishes (isospondyls) were assigned to Osteoglossiformes, Salmoniformes, Cetomimiformes, etc.[3]

Families

Phylogeny of Clupeiformes by Lavoué et al 2014.[4]
Clupeiformes
Denticipitoidei

Denticipitidae

Clupeoidei
Engraulidae

Coiliinae

Engraulinae

Spratelloidinae

Pristigasteridae

Dussumieriidae s.s.

Chirocentridae

Clupeidae

Clupeinae

Ehiravinae

Alosinae

Dorosomatinae

The order includes about 405 species in seven families:[5][6]

Timeline of genera

QuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneCretaceousJurassicHolocenePleistocenePlioceneMioceneOligoceneEocenePaleoceneLate CretaceousEarly CretaceousLate JurassicMiddle JurassicEarly JurassicAustroclupeaSarmatellaEngraulisXyneQuisqueGanolytesGanoessusEtringusAliseaPseudohilsaSardinopsIlishaAnchoaStolephorusSardinaPomolobusOpisthonemaAlosaSardinellaEtrumeusChirocentrusHarengulaClupeaHacquetiaKnightiaGasteroclupeaHistiothrissaLeufuichthysScombroclupeaOrnategulumDaitingichthysPachythrissopsQuaternaryNeogenePaleogeneCretaceousJurassicHolocenePleistocenePlioceneMioceneOligoceneEocenePaleoceneLate CretaceousEarly CretaceousLate JurassicMiddle JurassicEarly Jurassic

References

  1. ^ Nelson, Gareth (1998). Paxton, J.R.; Eschmeyer, W.N. (eds.). Encyclopedia of Fishes. San Diego: Academic Press. pp. 91–95. ISBN 0-12-547665-5.
  2. ^ Journal of Ichthyology. 46. Scripta. 2006. p. S40. within Isospondyli (= Clupeiformes s. lato)
  3. ^ lfonso L. Rojo (2017). Dictionary of Evolutionary Fish Osteology. CRC. p. 170. ISBN 978-1-351-36604-5. Under the name Isospondyli, Regan (1909) grouped the fishes having the verterbrae immediately after the skull similar in shape to the remaining ones, in contrast to the ostariophysans, in which the anterior vertebrae are greatly modified. Modern classifications have rejected this artificially constructed group, and the fishes previously assigned to it have been distributed among different orders (Clupeiformes, Osteoglossiformes, Salmoniformes, Cetomimiformes, etc.)
  4. ^ Sébastien Lavoué, Peter Konstantinidis & Wei-Jen Chen: Progress in Clupeiform Systematics. in Konstantinos Ganias (Hrsg.): Biology and Ecology of Sardines and Anchovies. CRC Press, 2014, ISBN 978-1482228540
  5. ^ Froese, Rainer, and Daniel Pauly, eds. (2012). "Clupeiformes" in FishBase. August 2012 version.
  6. ^ Lavoue ´ S; Miya M; Musikasinthorn P; Chen W-J; Nishida M (2013). "Mitogenomic Evidence for an Indo-West Pacific Origin of the Clupeoidei (Teleostei: Clupeiformes)". PLoS ONE. 8 (2): e56485. Bibcode:2013PLoSO...856485L. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0056485. PMC 3576394. PMID 23431379.
  • Sepkoski, Jack (2002). "A compendium of fossil marine animal genera". Bulletins of American Paleontology. 363: 1–560. Archived from the original on 2009-02-20. Retrieved 2011-05-17.