Clymene (wife of Iapetus)

Summary

In Greek mythology, Clymene or Klymene (/ˈklɪmɪn, ˈkl-/;[1][2] Ancient Greek: Κλυμένη, Kluménē, feminine form of Κλύμενος, meaning "famous"[3]) is the name of one of the three thousand Oceanid nymphs, usually the wife of Iapetus and mother by him of Prometheus, Epimetheus, Atlas and Menoetius.

Clymene
Member of the Oceanids
Other namesAsia
AbodeOcean
Personal information
ParentsOceanus and Tethys
Siblingsthe Oceanids, the Potamoi
ConsortIapetus
ChildrenPrometheus, Epimetheus, Atlas, Menoetius

MythologyEdit

Clymene is the daughter of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys.[4][5][6] She married Iapetus and became by him the mother of Prometheus, Epimetheus, Atlas and Menoetius.[7] Other authors relate the same of her sister Asia.[8] A less common genealogy makes Clymene the mother of Deucalion by Prometheus.[9] She may also be the Clymene referred to as the mother of Mnemosyne by Zeus.[10] In some myths, Clymene was one of the nymphs in the train of Cyrene.[11]

Although she shares name and parentage with Clymene, one of Helios's lovers, who is also a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys (and thus one of her sisters and fellow Oceanid), she is distinguished from her.[12]

GenealogyEdit

Clymene's family tree[13]
UranusGaiaPontus
OceanusTethysHyperionTheiaCriusEurybia
The RiversThe OceanidsHeliosSelene[14]EosAstraeusPallasPerses
CronusRheaCoeusPhoebe
HestiaHeraHadesZeusLetoAsteria
DemeterPoseidon
IapetusCLYMENE (or Asia)[15]Mnemosyne(Zeus)Themis
Atlas[16]MenoetiusPrometheus[17]EpimetheusThe MusesThe Horae

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Russell, William F. (1989). Classic myths to read aloud. New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 9780307774439.
  2. ^ Barchers, Suzanne I. (2001). From Atalanta to Zeus : readers theatre from Greek mythology. Englewood, Colo.: Teacher Ideas Press. p. 192. ISBN 9781563088155.
  3. ^ Liddell & Scott (1940), A Greek–English Lexicon, Oxford: Clarendon Press, Κλύμενος
  4. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 351
  5. ^ Kerényi, Carl (1951). The Gods of the Greeks. London: Thames and Hudson. p. 41.
  6. ^ Bane, Theresa (2013). Encyclopedia of Fairies in World Folklore and Mythology. McFarland, Incorporated, Publishers. p. 36, 87. ISBN 9780786471119.
  7. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 508; Hyginus, Fabulae Preface; Scholiast on Pindar, Olympian Odes 9.68
  8. ^ Apollodorus, 1.2.3
  9. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitates Romanae 1.17.3; Scholia on Pindar, Olympian Ode 9.81; on Homer, Odyssey 10.2
  10. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface
  11. ^ Virgil, Georgics 4.345
  12. ^ Hard Robin, pg. 44
  13. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 132–138, 337–411, 453–520, 901–906, 915–920; Caldwell, pp. 8–11, tables 11–14.
  14. ^ Although usually the daughter of Hyperion and Theia, as in Hesiod, Theogony 371–374, in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes (4), 99–100, Selene is instead made the daughter of Pallas the son of Megamedes.
  15. ^ According to Hesiod, Theogony 507–511, Clymene, one of the Oceanids, the daughters of Oceanus and Tethys, at Hesiod, Theogony 351, was the mother by Iapetus of Atlas, Menoetius, Prometheus, and Epimetheus, while according to Apollodorus, 1.2.3, another Oceanid, Asia was their mother by Iapetus.
  16. ^ According to Plato, Critias, 113d–114a, Atlas was the son of Poseidon and the mortal Cleito.
  17. ^ In Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound 18, 211, 873 (Sommerstein, pp. 444–445 n. 2, 446–447 n. 24, 538–539 n. 113) Prometheus is made to be the son of Themis.

BibliographyEdit

  • Apollodorus, Gods & Heroes of the Greeks: The Library of Apollodorus, Michael Simpson (translator), The University of Massachusetts Press, (1976). ISBN 0870232053.
  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Hesiod, Theogony, in The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Hyginus, Gaius Julius, The Myths of Hyginus. Edited and translated by Mary A. Grant, Lawrence: University of Kansas Press, 1960.
  • Gantz, Timothy, Early Greek Myth: A Guide to Literary and Artistic Sources, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1996, Two volumes: ISBN 978-0-8018-5360-9 (Vol. 1), ISBN 978-0-8018-5362-3 (Vol. 2).
  • Hard, Robin, The Routledge Handbook of Greek Mythology: Based on H.J. Rose's "Handbook of Greek Mythology", Psychology Press, 2004, ISBN 9780415186360. Google Books.

External linksEdit

  • CLYMENE from The Theoi Project