Cretheus

Summary

In Greek mythology, Cretheus (/ˈkrθiəs, -θjs/; Ancient Greek: Κρηθεύς Krētheus) was the king and founder of Iolcus, the son of Aeolus (son of Hellen) by either Enarete[1][2] or Laodice.[3] His wives were Tyro and either Demodice or Biadice.[4] With Tyro, he fathered Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon.[5][6][7] When Cretheus found out that Tyro had an affair with Poseidon, he left her and married Sidero.[8] He also had several daughters, namely Hippolyte, future wife of Acastus[9] (otherwise known as Astydameia[10]); Myrina, who married Thoas.[11]

Cretheus, corrected as Cres, had an unnamed daughter, who became the mother of Asterius by Teutamus.[12]

Notes

  1. ^ Hesiod, Catalogue of Women fr. 10(a)
  2. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus. Bibliotheca, 1.7.3
  3. ^ Scholia on Homer. Odyssey, 11.235
  4. ^ Hyginus, Astronomica, 2. 20; she unsuccessfully tried to seduce Phrixus and falsely accused him of an attempt to rape her, cf. the stories of Phaedra and Hippolytus, Stheneboea and Bellerophon, Astydameia and Peleus, Phthia/Clytia and Phoenix, Philonome and Tenes, Ochne and Eunostus
  5. ^ Homer, Odyssey, 11. 259
  6. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus. Bibliotheca, 1.9.11
  7. ^ Tzetzes on Lycophron, 175
  8. ^ Hamilton, Edith (1942). Mythology. Little, Brown and Company. p. 299. ISBN 9780316438520.
  9. ^ Pindar, Nemean Ode, 4. 57
  10. ^ Pseudo-Apollodorus. Bibliotheca, 3.13.2
  11. ^ Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1. 601
  12. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca historica 4.60.2

References

  • Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History translated by Charles Henry Oldfather. Twelve volumes. Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd. 1989. Vol. 3. Books 4.59–8. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
  • Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca Historica. Vol 1-2. Immanel Bekker. Ludwig Dindorf. Friedrich Vogel. in aedibus B. G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1888–1890. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Hesiod, Theogony from The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Hyginus, Astronomica from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Pindar, Odes translated by Diane Arnson Svarlien. 1990. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pindar, The Odes of Pindar including the Principal Fragments with an Introduction and an English Translation by Sir John Sandys, Litt.D., FBA. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1937. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Pseudo-Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.