Cyclopentene

Summary

Cyclopentene is a chemical compound with the formula (CH2)3(CH)2. It is a colorless liquid with a petrol-like odor. It has few applications, and thus is mainly used as a component of gasoline.[1] It is one of the principal cycloalkenes.

Cyclopentene
Cyclopentene
Ball-and-stick model of cyclopentene
Space-filling model of cyclopentene
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Cyclopentene
Identifiers
  • 142-29-0 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChEBI
  • CHEBI:49155 checkY
ChEMBL
  • ChEMBL1797299 ☒N
ChemSpider
  • 8544 checkY
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.030 Edit this at Wikidata
  • 8882
UNII
  • ONM2CKV81Z checkY
  • DTXSID6029171 Edit this at Wikidata
  • InChI=1S/C5H8/c1-2-4-5-3-1/h1-2H,3-5H2 checkY
    Key: LPIQUOYDBNQMRZ-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C5H8/c1-2-4-5-3-1/h1-2H,3-5H2
    Key: LPIQUOYDBNQMRZ-UHFFFAOYAS
  • C1CC=CC1
Properties
C5H8
Molar mass 68.11 g/mol
Density 0.771 g/cm3
Melting point −135 °C (−211 °F; 138 K)
Boiling point 44 to 46 °C (111 to 115 °F; 317 to 319 K)
Hazards
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
1
3
1
Flash point −29 °C (−20 °F; 244 K)
Related compounds
Related compounds
Cyclopentadiene
Cyclobutene
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

ProductionEdit

Cyclopentene is produced industrially in large amounts by steam cracking of naphtha. In the laboratory, it is prepared by dehydration of cyclopentanol.[2]

It can also produced by the catalytic hydrogenation of cyclopentadiene.[3]

 

Use in mechanistic organic chemistryEdit

Cyclopentene is used in analysing the mechanisms of organic reactions. It can be obtained from vinylcyclopropane in the vinylcyclopropane-cyclopentene rearrangement.[4]

The polymerization of cyclopentene by Ziegler-Natta catalysts yields 1,3-linkages, not the more typical 1,2-linked polymer.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dieter Hönicke; Ringo Födisch; Peter Claus; Michael Olson (2002). "Cyclopentadiene and Cyclopentene". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a08_227.
  2. ^ B. B. Corson, V. N. Ipatieff (1939). "Cyclohexylbenzene". Organic Syntheses. 19: 36. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.019.0036.
  3. ^ D. Hönicke, R. Födisch, P. Claus, M. Olson: Cyclopentadiene and Cyclopentene, in: Ullmanns Enzyklopädie der Technischen Chemie 2002, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim.
  4. ^ Baldwin, John E. (2003). "Thermal Rearrangements of Vinylcyclopropanes to Cyclopentenes". Chemical Reviews. 103 (4): 1197–212. doi:10.1021/cr010020z. PMID 12683781.
  5. ^ Collins, Scott; Kelly, W. Mark (1992). "The microstructure of poly(cyclopentene) produced by polymerization of cyclopentene with homogeneous Ziegler-Natta catalysts". Macromolecules. 25 (1): 233–7. Bibcode:1992MaMol..25..233C. doi:10.1021/ma00027a039.

External linksEdit

  •   Media related to Cyclopentene at Wikimedia Commons