DRUMS

Summary

DRUMS (Debris Removal Unprecedented Micro-Satellite) is an experimental spacecraft that will test proximity operation near space debris. The microsatellite carries two 'mock space debris' which once deployed will be used as a target for demonstrating approach and contact.[1]

Overview

DRUMS was developed by Japanese company Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI), which will also operate the satellite following its launch.[2] DRUMS will be operated from a ground station inside KHI's Gifu Works facility, and an antenna for communicating with the satellite was finished in October 2019.[3] KHI characterizes DRUMS as a demonstration for future missions to remove rocket upper stages from orbit,[4] along with potential applications for on-orbit satellite servicing.[5] DRUMS is planned to be launched in October 2021 by an Epsilon rocket.[2] A half size model of DRUMS was displayed at the 2019 G20 Osaka summit.[6]

Mission

Once in orbit, DRUMS will deploy two nonfunctional objects, which will act as targets for DRUMS's space debris approach test. After distancing itself from the target, DRUMS will then begin to approach it using on board optical sensors.[7][8] The microsatellite has nitrogen gas propulsion for maneuvering, along with lighting it will use to illuminate the target while inside Earth's shadow.[2][5] Once it has arrived near the target, DRUMS will extend a 2 m (6 ft 7 in) boom, which will be used to physically contact the target.[7][5] DRUM's camera will record the overall sequence of the test.[9]

See also

References

  1. ^ Nakamoto, Hiroki; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Yasutaka (9 December 2019). Key Technology Demonstration for Active Debris Removal by Microsat "DRUMS" (PDF). First International Orbital Debris Conference. Universities Space Research Association. Retrieved 24 September 2021.
  2. ^ a b c Otsuka, Minoru (24 August 2021). "9機の革新衛星は宇宙で何を実証する? イプシロン5号機で10月に打ち上げへ". Mynavi News (in Japanese). Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  3. ^ "Kawasaki Establishes Satellite Ground Station to Pursue Space Debris Removal Operations" (Press release). Kawasaki Heavy Industries. 4 October 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2021.
  4. ^ Otsuka, Minoru (2 July 2020). "宇宙のお掃除サービスはいつ実現する? デブリ除去衛星開発の最前線を追う". MONOist (in Japanese). Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  5. ^ a b c "小型衛星を用いてスペースデブリへの接近と捕獲の技術実証を行い、軌道上サービスへの事業拡大を目指す" (in Japanese). JAXA. Retrieved 24 September 2021.
  6. ^ "川崎重工、G20大阪サミットで宇宙ゴミ除去技術を展示". WING Aviation Press (in Japanese). 1 July 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2021.
  7. ^ a b Otsuka, Minoru (4 December 2018). "川重がデブリ除去で衛星分野に参入、2020年にも打上げ-国際航空宇宙展2018". Mynavi News (in Japanese). Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  8. ^ Morita, Daichi; Watase, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Shibasaki, Koichi; Yamamoto, Toru; Murakami, Naomi; Nakajima, Yu. "Study on visual based navigation algorithm for active debris removal missions". JAXA Special Publication: Proceedings of the 8th Space Debris Workshop. The 8th Space Debris Workshop. JAXA. pp. 473–484. Retrieved 14 September 2021.
  9. ^ Nakamoto, Hiroki; Maruyama, Tatsuya; Sugawara, Yasutaka (9 December 2019). Key Technology Demonstration for Active Debris Removal by Microsat “DRUMS” (PDF). First International Orbital Debris Conference. Universities Space Research Association. Retrieved 24 September 2021.

External links

  • DRUMS