Daniel P. Beard

Summary

Daniel P. Beard served as the Commissioner of the United States Bureau of Reclamation,[1][2] and as the fourth Chief Administrative Officer of the United States House of Representatives.[3][4]

Daniel P. Beard
Beard photographed during State of the Union Address c. 2008
Beard photographed during
State of the Union Address
c. 2008
Born1943 (age 78–79)
Bellingham, Washington
OccupationAuthor
Alma materWestern Washington University
University of Washington
SpouseDana Beard
Children3

Beard is the author of Deadbeat Dams: Why We Should Abolish the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and Tear Down Glen Canyon Dam which outlines how tax dollars are being used and misused and why we are ignoring some immediate critical water problems. Deadbeat Dams advocates a unique set of policy reforms which Beard claims could save taxpayers billions of dollars and end the waste of water in a time of critical water shortages.

CareerEdit

Beard began his career with the Library of Congress in 1970 where he worked for the Congressional Research Service, and he served as an Assistant Director on President Jimmy Carter’s Domestic Policy Staff now known as the Domestic Policy Council in the White House (1977).[5]

He also served as a Deputy Assistant Secretary in the United States Department of the Interior during the Carter Administration and served as Chief of Staff for Montana Senator Max Baucus (1982-1984).

From 1985-1993, he worked for the United States House Committee on Natural Resources where he was the Staff Director for the Water and Power Subcommittee before becoming Staff Director of the full committee in 1991.

Beard was appointed to the position of Commissioner, United States Bureau of Reclamation by President Bill Clinton in 1993. He served in that position until September 1995.

He was elected to the position of Chief Administrative Officer of the United States House of Representatives[6] in February 2007 and remained in that position until resigning in July 2010. While in that position, he assisted in development and implementation of the Green the Capitol Program,[7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14] an initiative to make the United States Capitol a more environmentally sustainable workplace, the mission to make the millions of square feet of Capitol infrastructure a model of sustainability.[15]

Beard serves on the Board of Trustees of the American Forest Foundation.[16]

EducationEdit

A native of Bellingham, Washington, Dr. Beard earned a B.A. from Western Washington University[17] and both his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

He and his wife of over fifty years have three adult children, as well as two grandchildren. They have resided in Columbia, Maryland since 1974.

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Daniel P. Beard, Commissioner, Bureau of Reclamation, 1993 - 1995". U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation. Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  2. ^ "Remarks of Bureau of Reclamation Commissioner Dan Beard". United States Congressional Record, Proceedings of the 103rd congress. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office. December 20, 1994. p. E. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  3. ^ "Congratulating Lorraine C. Miller and Daniel P. Beard on their Election as Officers of the House". United States Congressional Record, Proceedings of the 110th congress. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office. 2007. p. 4242. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  4. ^ O'Conner, Patrick (January 31, 2007). "Pelosi Names Daniel Beard New Chief Administrative Officer". Politico. Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  5. ^ Struglinski, Suzanne. "Insiders' Guide to Key Committee Staff of the U.S. Congress, 22nd Edition (2009)". The Rowman & Littlefield Publishing Group, Inc. Retrieved January 15, 2015.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ Speaker of the House (January 31, 2007). "Pelosi Names Daniel P. Beard New Chief Administrative Officer" (Press release). Retrieved January 14, 2015.
  7. ^ Yehles, Emily (July 27, 2010). "Capitol to Buy Offsets in Bid to Go Green". The New York Times. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  8. ^ Weisman, Jonathan (November 5, 2007). "Green the Capitol Program Turns Down Volume After Directors Departure". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  9. ^ Layton, Lyndsey (May 25, 2007). "A Carbon-Neutral House?". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  10. ^ Kane, Paul (December 16, 2009). "House takes steps to boost cybersecurity". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  11. ^ Abrams, Jim (June 11, 2007). "Lawmakers Want Capitol to Go Green". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  12. ^ Layton, Lyndsey (April 21, 2007). "Reliance on Coal Sullies 'Green the Capitol' Effort". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  13. ^ Lee, Christopher (April 2, 2008). "Beacon or Boondoggle? New Lights For the Capitol". The Washington Post. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  14. ^ Abrams, Jim (June 21, 2007). "House to Cut Capitol Energy Consumption". The Washington Post. Associated Press. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
  15. ^ "Recognizing Dan Beard, 'Greening of the Capitol'". United States Congressional Record, Proceedings of the 110th congress. Washington, DC: United States Government Printing Office. January 22, 2008. pp. E56–E57. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  16. ^ "American Forest Foundation, Board of Trustees". American Forest Foundation. Retrieved January 17, 2015.
  17. ^ "America's Best Colleges, Notable Alumni of Western Washington University". Forbes. Retrieved January 15, 2015.
Cultural offices
Preceded by
James M. Eagen, III
Chief Administrative Officer of the United States House of Representatives
2007–2010
Succeeded by
Daniel J. Strodel
Preceded by
Dennis B. Underwood
Commissioner of the United States Bureau of Reclamation
1993–1995
Succeeded by
Eluid L. Martinez