Eclipse Foundation

Summary

The Eclipse Foundation
Eclipse Foundation Logo.svg
FormationFebruary 2, 2004 (2004-02-02)[1]
Purposeadvance open source projects, cultivate communities and business ecosystems.
HeadquartersOttawa, Ontario, Canada
Membership
320+ members
Executive Director
Mike Milinkovich
Websitewww.eclipse.org

The Eclipse Foundation AISBL is an independent, Canada-based not-for-profit corporation that acts as a steward of the Eclipse open source software development community, with legal jurisdiction in the European Union.[2] It is an organization supported by over 320 members. The Foundation focuses on key services such as: intellectual property (IP) management, ecosystem development, development process, and IT infrastructure. Its members include industry leaders who have embraced open source as a key enabler for business strategy.[3]

Created to allow a vendor-neutral, open, and transparent community to be established around the original Eclipse Project, the Foundation provides a global community of individuals and organizations with a mature, scalable, and commercially focused environment for collaboration and innovation. Its stated aim is to cultivate both the community and "an ecosystem of complementary products and services.[3]

The Eclipse Foundation is considered a "third generation"[4] open-source organization, and is home to Jakarta EE, and over 400 open source projects, including runtimes, tools, and frameworks for a wide range of technology domains such as the internet of things (IoT), cloud and edge computing, automotive, systems engineering, digital ledger technologies, and open processor designs. "The most well-known of the Eclipse projects is the Eclipse platform, a multi-language software development environment and IDE".[3]

History

The Eclipse Project was originally created by IBM in November 2001 and was supported by a consortium of software vendors. The Eclipse Project continues to be used by millions of developers.[3]

In 2004, the Eclipse Foundation was founded to lead and develop the Eclipse community.[5] It was created to allow a vendor-neutral, open, and transparent community to be established around Eclipse.[3]

Eclipse Foundation Projects

As of October 2021, the Eclipse Foundation hosts more than 415 open source projects.[6]

There are more than 1,750 committers to Eclipse projects and more than 332 million lines of code have been contributed to Eclipse project repositories as of October 2021.[7]

Top Level Eclipse Projects

The Foundation utilizes a hierarchical project structure. Each project stems from a primary parent project and may have sub-projects. The uppermost projects, which do not have a parent project, are called Top Level Projects.[8]

As of October 2021, the Eclipse Foundation Top Level projects are:

  • Adoptium
  • Eclipse Cloud Development
  • Eclipse Project
  • Eclipse Enterprise for Java (EE4J)
  • Eclipse IoT
  • LocationTech
  • Eclipse Modeling Project
  • Eclipse Mylyn (Application Lifecycle Tools)
  • OpenHW Group
  • Eclipse PolarSys
  • Eclipse RT
  • Eclipse Science
  • Eclipse SOA Platform Project
  • Eclipse Technology
  • Eclipse Tools Project
  • Eclipse Web Tools Platform Project (WTP) Source Editing
  • Eclipse Web Services

Eclipse Working Groups

The Eclipse Foundation is governed by a set of bylaws, agreements, and policies. One aspect of this governance is vendor-neutrality. A Vendor-neutral governance model is one which encourages industry collaborations, which are carried out using Working Groups.

Eclipse Working Groups are the collaboration of organizations that combine practices of open source development, with a set of services required for open innovation. They allow organizations to foster industry collaborations across organizational boundaries.[9]

As of October 2021, the Eclipse Foundation hosts 18 Working Groups.

These include:

Adoptium

The Adoptium Working Group promotes and supports high-quality runtimes and associated technology for use across the Java ecosystem. Our vision is to meet the needs of Eclipse and the broader Java community by providing runtimes for Java-based applications. We embrace existing standards and a wide variety of hardware and cloud platforms.

AsciiDoc

The AsciiDoc Working Group drives the standardization, adoption, and evolution of AsciiDoc. This group encourages and shapes the open, collaborative development of the AsciiDoc language and its processors in order to provide a lexicon for authoring technical content and a common interface for AsciiDoc-compatible applications and services.

Eclipse Cloud Development Tools

The Eclipse Cloud Development (ECD) Tools Working Group will drive the evolution and broad adoption of de facto standards for cloud development tools, including language support, extensions, developer workspace definition and more.

Eclipse IDE

The Eclipse IDE Working Group is formed to ensure the continued sustainability, integrity, evolution and adoption of the Eclipse IDE suite of products and related technologies. In particular, it is formed to provide governance, guidance, and funding for the communities that support the delivery of the Eclipse Foundation’s flagship “Eclipse IDE” products.

Edge Native

The Eclipse Edge Native Working Group drives the evolution and broad adoption of Edge Computing-related technologies.

GEMOC Research Consortium

The GEMOC Research Consortium is an open and collaborative initiative which supports the development, coordination, and dissemination of the research efforts on the use and globalization of modeling languages.

Internet of Things

The Eclipse IoT Working Group provides the open technology needed to build IoT devices, gateways and cloud platforms. Eclipse SmartHome, serving as the foundation of openHAB, QIVICON and others, is a subdivision of Eclipse IoT.[10]

Jakarta EE

The Jakarta EE Working Group cultivates business interests related to cloud native Java technologies.

MicroProfile

The MicroProfile Working Group drives the evolution and broad adoption of technologies related to the MicroProfile Project. MicroProfile is an open forum that optimizes Enterprise Java for a microservice architecture by innovating across multiple implementations and collaborating on common areas of interest with a goal of standardization.

OpenADx

The OpenADx Working Group is centered around the autonomous driving toolchain and aims to bring transparency and better integration capabilities into the autonomous driving tool space.

OpenGENESIS

The openGENESIS Working Group aims to foster, support and provide knowledge, methods, and tools for the assessment of AI used in autonomous driving applications.

OpenHW

OpenHW Group is an independent not-for-profit, global organization where hardware and software designers collaborate in the development of open-source cores, related IP, tools and software, using industry best practices. OpenHW has released its first 32bit RISC-V compliant processor core and has several processor cores in active development.

openMDM

The openMDM Working Group provides tools and systems, qualification kits and adapters for standardized and vendor independent management of measurement data in accordance with the ASAM ODS standard.

openMobility

The openMobility Working Group shapes and fosters the development of required software tools and frameworks based on validated mobility models in order to provide a common platform for industrial applications and academic research.

openPASS

The openPASS Working Group develops core frameworks and modules for the safety assessment of driving assistance and automated driving systems.

OSGi

The OSGi Working Group drives the evolution and broad adoption of software technologies derived from or related to the OSGi Specification Project which is an open source initiative to create software specifications, compatible implementations and TCKs to enable development, deployment and management of embedded, server-side, and cloud-native applications by using software modularity to vastly improve the evolution, maintainability, and interoperability of applications and infrastructure.

Science

The Eclipse Science Working Group is a collaboration of people developing software components used for basic scientific research.[11]

Sparkplug

The Eclipse Sparkplug Working Group seeks to drive the evolution and broad adoption of the Eclipse Sparkplug protocol and related technologies that enable the creation of open, collaborative, and interoperable Industrial IoT (IIoT) solutions.

Tangle EE

The Tangle EE Working Group provides a governed environment for organizations and contributors to develop new ideas and applications using IOTA technologies.

Types of Membership

There are four types of membership to the Eclipse Foundation.[12] These include:

Strategic Members

Strategic Members are organizations that invest developers and other resources to further develop the Eclipse technology. Each strategic member has a representative on the Eclipse Foundation Board of Directors.

There are two types of strategic members. These types are Strategic Developers and Strategic Consumers.

  • Strategic Developers are major contributors of open source technology to Eclipse. Strategic developers lead Eclipse Foundation open source projects and have at least eight developers assigned full-time to develop Eclipse technologies. These members also have representation on the Eclipse Architecture Council.
  • Strategic Consumers are major users of Eclipse technology. Strategic Consumers have the option to contribute one or two developers to Eclipse projects.[13]

Current Strategic Members

As of October 2021, there are 16 Strategic Members.[14] These include (in alphabetical order):

  • CEA LIST
  • Daimler TSS GmbH
  • Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luftund Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR)
  • European Space Agency (ESA)
  • Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems (FOKUS)
  • Fujitsu Limited
  • Huawei
  • IBM
  • IOTA Foundation
  • Microsoft Corp.
  • OBEO
  • Oracle
  • Red Hat, Inc.
  • Robert Bosch GmbH
  • SAP SE
  • Skymind

Contributing Members

Contributing Members (formerly known as Solutions Members)[15] are organizations that participate in the development of the Eclipse ecosystem. These organizations offer products and services based on, or with, Eclipse.[16]

As of October 2021, there are 170 Contributing Members involved with the Eclipse Foundation.[17]

Associate Members

Associate Members are non-voting members who can submit requirements, participate in project reviews and participate in the Annual Meeting of the Membership at Large. Associate members also participate in scheduled quarterly update meetings of the same.[18]

As of October 2021, there are 135 Associate Members of the Eclipse Foundation.[19]

Committer Members

Committer Members are committers who become full members of the Eclipse Foundation. Committers are the core developers of Eclipse projects and can commit changes to project source code. Committer Members have representation on the Board of Directors.

Funding

The Eclipse Foundation is a non-profit member-supported organization. The Foundation is funded largely from membership dues.

  • Strategic members contribute annual dues of 0.2% of their corporate revenues (minimum $25K, maximum $500K).
  • The annual membership fee for Enterprise Members is tiered based on revenue.
    • There is one standard Enterprise membership fee for non-for-profit organizations, standards bodies, universities, research institutes, media and publishing, government and other organization types as defined by the Eclipse Foundation board of directors.
  • The annual membership fee for Solutions Members is tiered based on revenue.
    • There is one standard Solutions membership fee for not-for-profit organizations, standards bodies, universities, research institutes, media and publishing, government and other organization types as defined by the Eclipse Foundation board of directors.
  • Associate membership is gratis for not-for-profit organizations, standards bodies, universities, research institutes, media and publishing, government and other organization types as defined by the Eclipse Foundation board of directors.
    • There is one standard annual fee for all other organizations, including for-profits.

Events

The Eclipse Foundation hosts 3 main types of events: Conferences, Demo Camps, and Eclipse Days.

Conferences

Eclipse Foundation conferences host technical sessions on current topics pertinent to the Eclipse developer and the Eclipse Working Group communities, as well as sessions that demonstrate Eclipse-based tools in action.[20]

The Eclipse Foundation's flagship event is EclipseCon. It provides opportunity for the Eclipse community to learn, explore, share and collaborate on the latest ideas and information about Eclipse and its member companies.[21]

Demo Camps & Stammtisch

Eclipse DemoCamps are collaborative events. DemoCamps include technical talks and demonstrations from the Eclipse community [22] and showcase the technology being built by the Eclipse community.[23]  

Eclipse Days and Hackathons

Eclipse Days are day-long events focused on Eclipse Technology. Eclipse Days facilitate networking and face-to-face interactions within the Eclipse Community.

Eclipse Hackathons are gatherings of developers to work on bugs and feature requests to create a patch for projects. Developers divide into small groups led by veteran of the project to complete the patch.[24]

References

  1. ^ "Eclipse Forms Independent Organization". Press Release. Archived from the original on 2004-04-07. Retrieved 2004-02-04.
  2. ^ "Open Source Software Leader the Eclipse Foundation Officially Transitions to EU-based Governance". Eclipse News, Eclipse in the News, Eclipse Announcement. 2021-01-14. Retrieved 2021-06-29.
  3. ^ a b c d e "About the Eclipse Foundation". Eclipse.org. Eclipse Foundation. Archived from the original on 2011-06-28. Retrieved 5 September 2018.
  4. ^ François Letellier (2008), Open Source Software: the Role of Nonprofits in Federating Business and Innovation Ecosystems, AFME 2008.
  5. ^ Milinkovich, M. "Eclipse Forms Independent Organization |". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  6. ^ "Open Source Leader The Eclipse Foundation Adds Record Number of New Members in 2020". June 9, 2020.
  7. ^ Milinkovich, Mike. "2020 Annual Eclipse Foundation Community Report". www.eclipse.org. p. Membership.
  8. ^ Beaton, Wayne. "Eclipse Development Process 2015 | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-04. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  9. ^ Guindon, Christopher. "About Eclipse Working Groups | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-05. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  10. ^ "Eclipse SmartHome - A Flexible Framework for the Smart Home". eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-10-25. Retrieved 25 October 2018.
  11. ^ "Collaboration yields open source technology for computational science". www.ornl.gov. Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
  12. ^ Inc., Eclipse Foundation. "Types of Membership | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  13. ^ Inc., Eclipse Foundation. "Types of Membership | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  14. ^ "Explore Our Members | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2019-10-27. Retrieved 2019-10-27.
  15. ^ "Eclipse Foundation". eclipse.org. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
  16. ^ Inc., Eclipse Foundation. "Types of Membership | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  17. ^ Guindon, Christopher. "Explore Our Members | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  18. ^ Inc., Eclipse Foundation. "Types of Membership | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  19. ^ Guindon, Christopher. "Explore Our Members | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  20. ^ "EclipseCon France 2018". EclipseCon France2018. 2014-01-28. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  21. ^ "EclipseCon". 2018-01-16.
  22. ^ "Eclipse Insight: Building Modeling Tools". Eventbrite (in German). Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  23. ^ "Eclipse DemoCamps 2018 - Eclipsepedia". wiki.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.
  24. ^ Joncas, Roxanne. "Organize an Eclipse DemoCamp or Hackathons | The Eclipse Foundation". www.eclipse.org. Archived from the original on 2018-09-06. Retrieved 2018-09-05.

Further reading

  • Kerner, Sean Michael (2006-06-26). "Eclipse's 'Callisto' Onslaught". internetnews.com.
  • Kerner, Sean Michael (2006-09-05). "Eclipse Adoption on The Rise". internetnews.com.
  • Kerner, Sean Michael (2006-11-08). "Five Years On: The Future of Eclipse". internetnews.com.

External links