Ekspress AM4R

Summary

Ekspress-AM4R
NamesЭкспресс-АМ4Р
Mission typeCommunications
OperatorRussian Satellite Communications Company (RSCC)
Mission duration15 years (planned)
Failed to orbit
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftEkspress AM4R
Spacecraft typeEkspress
BusEurostar 3000
ManufacturerEADS Astrium
Launch mass5,775 kg (12,732 lb) [1]
Start of mission
Launch date15 May 2014, 21:42:00 UTC [2]
RocketProton-M / Briz-M
Launch siteBaikonur, Site 200/39
ContractorKhrunichev
End of mission
DisposalFailed to orbit
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit (planned)
RegimeGeosynchronous orbit
Longitude80° East
Transponders
Band30 C-band
28 Ku-band
2 Ka-band
3 L-band
Coverage areaRussia
 

Ekspress-AM4R (Russian: Экспресс-АМ4Р meaning Express-AM4R) [3] was a Russian communications satellite intended for operation by the Russian Satellite Communications Company (RSCC). Constructed as a replacement for Ekspress AM4, which was left unusable after the upper stage of the launch vehicle carrying it malfunctioned, Ekspress-AM4R was also lost due to a launch failure.[4]

Astrium, which had become part of Airbus Defence and Space by the time of the satellite's launch, constructed Ekspress AM4R, which was based on the Eurostar 3000 satellite bus.[5] It was identical in design to Ekspress-AM4, with a mass of 5,775 kg (12,732 lb) and a planned operational lifespan of fifteen years. The satellite carried sixty-three transponders: thirty operating in the C-band of the electromagnetic spectrum, twenty eight in the Ku-band, two in the Ka-band and three in the L-band. It was to have been the largest and most powerful satellite in the Ekspress constellation.[1]

Khrunichev was contracted to launch Ekspress AM4R, using a Proton-M / Briz-M launch vehicle - the same configuration that had failed to deploy Ekspress AM4. The launch took place from Site 200/39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, at 21:42:00 UTC on 15 May 2014. Shortly after launch the rocket was reported to have encountered a problem during third stage flight, and as a result the satellite failed to reach orbit.[2]

References

  1. ^ a b Krebs, Gunter (11 December 2017). "Ekspress-AM 4, 4R". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 25 March 2021.
  2. ^ a b Graham, William; Bergin, Chris (15 May 2014). "Russian Proton-M suffers failure during Ekspress-AM4R launch". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 25 March 2021.
  3. ^ "Ракета "Протон-М" для запуска "Экспресс-АМ4Р" доставлена на Байконур". RIA Novosti. 28 February 2014. Retrieved 25 March 2021.
  4. ^ Zak, Anatoly. "Proton fails again with Ekspress satellite". RussianSpaceWeb.com. Archived from the original on 27 May 2014. Retrieved 25 March 2021.
  5. ^ "Express AM4R and Express AM7". Astrium. Archived from the original on 3 April 2013. Retrieved 25 March 2021.