English rose (epithet)

Summary

English rose is a description, associated with English culture, that may be applied to a naturally beautiful woman or girl who is from or is associated with England.

The description has a cultural reference to the national flower of England, the rose,[1] and to its long tradition within English symbolism.

Use in artsEdit

The term "English rose" is found in Merrie England (1902), a comic opera written by Basil Hood. He describes a garden where "women are the flowers" and in which "the sweetest blossom" or "fairest queen" is "the perfect English rose".[2] The words are performed by a tenor in the role of Sir Walter Raleigh (1554–1618), in the presence of a May Queen, but regarding his secret love (purely within the opera), a member of the household of Elizabeth I.

At the Funeral of Diana, Princess of Wales in 1997, Elton John performed a new version of his 1974 hit, "Candle in the Wind", which began with the adapted lyrics, "Goodbye England's rose...".[3]

"Last of the English Roses" is a 2008 song by singer/songwriter Pete Doherty from his album Grace/Wastelands. English Rose is the name of the 2019 debut album by singer/songwriter Connie Constance; its first song is also titled "English Rose".

Notable "English roses"Edit

 
Diana, Princess of Wales was described as "England's rose" in the song "Candle in the Wind 1997"

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "England's National Symbols". englandforever.org/. Archived from the original on 10 August 2014. Retrieved 29 July 2014.
  2. ^ Dent, Susie, ed. (2012). Brewer's dictionary of phrase & fable (19th ed.). Edinburgh: Chambers. p. 445. ISBN 978-0-550-10245-4.
  3. ^ Davis, Sheila (15 October 1992). The songwriters idea book. Writer's Digest Books p.103. ISBN 978-0-89879-519-6. Archived from the original on 20 April 2017. Retrieved 13 March 2016. I thought it was very important to project it from a nation's standpoint. I wanted to make it sound like a country singing it. From the first couple of lines i wrote [which began "Goodbye England's Rose"], the rest sort of fell into place.
  4. ^ Cinema Year by Year: The Complete Illustrated History of Film. Dorling Kindersley. 2006. p. 470.
  5. ^ "As Millie, a real Julie Blossoms". Life magazine. 28 April 1967.
  6. ^ Coates, Hannah (7 September 2020). "5 Easy Steps To The Prettiest English Rose Make-Up Look". Vogue. Archived from the original on 26 August 2021. Retrieved 22 May 2021.
  7. ^ "Kate Beckinsale: English pearl". BBC. Archived from the original on 24 September 2008. Retrieved 22 June 2020.
  8. ^ "Helena Bonham Carter: Wicked fun of the wilted English rose". The Times. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 25 October 2020.
  9. ^ Kosin, Julie (25 August 2014). "The Enduring Appeal of Kate Middleton and Kate Moss". Harper's Bazaar. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 7 May 2021.
  10. ^ Coates, Hannah (7 September 2020). "5 Easy Steps To The Prettiest English Rose Make-Up Look". Vogue. Retrieved 22 May 2021.
  11. ^ "Diana: An English Rose". Royalty Magazine. 23 January 2015. Archived from the original on 6 December 2019.
  12. ^ Edwards, Jonathan (1 January 2020). "Lynne Frederick Remembered » We Are Cult". We Are Cult. Archived from the original on 29 September 2020. Retrieved 25 September 2020.
  13. ^ Mottram, James (15 March 2015). "Disney's Cinderella: Why Downton Abbey star Lily James is not just another English rose". The Independent. Archived from the original on 5 October 2016. Retrieved 3 October 2016.
  14. ^ "32 Times Keira Knightley Was The Ultimate English Rose". Elle. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  15. ^ "5 Easy Steps To The Prettiest English Rose Make-Up Look". Vogue. Archived from the original on 1 November 2020. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  16. ^ Sneed, Tierney (7 May 2014). "Amma Asante: 'Belle' Presents New Type of English Rose". U.S. News. Archived from the original on 22 August 2021. Retrieved 17 October 2021.
  17. ^ "Pike: I'm not just an English rose". Belfast Telegraph. 4 October 2014. Archived from the original on 22 August 2021. Retrieved 17 October 2021.
  18. ^ "Emma Watson is turned into wax at Madame Tussauds". Metro. Archived from the original on 25 June 2020. Retrieved 21 June 2020. She’s a true English rose known and loved by millions of film and fashion fans around the world"
  19. ^ "Rachel Weisz – Biography". Hello!. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 7 May 2021.
  20. ^ "Kate Winslet: The golden girl". The Independent. Archived from the original on 22 March 2010. Retrieved 23 June 2020.