Euaemon

Summary

In Greek mythology, Euaemon or Euaimon (Ancient Greek: Εὐαίμων) may refer to the following personages and a place:

  • Euaemon, one of the ten sons of Poseidon and Cleito in Plato's myth of Atlantis.[1] He was the younger brother of Ampheres and his other siblings were Atlas and Eumelus, Mneseus and Autochthon, Elasippus and Mestor, and lastly, Azaes and Diaprepes.[2] Evaemon, along with his nine siblings, became the heads of ten royal houses, each ruling a tenth portion of the island, according to a partition made by Poseidon himself, but all subject to the supreme dynasty of Atlas who was the eldest of the ten.[3]
  • Euaemon, an Arcadian prince as one of the 50 sons of the impious King Lycaon either by the naiad Cyllene,[4] Nonacris[5] or by unknown woman. He and his brothers were the most nefarious and carefree of all people. To test them, Zeus visited them in the form of a peasant. These brothers mixed the entrails of a child into the god's meal, whereupon the enraged Zeus threw the meal over the table. Euaemon was killed, along with his brothers and their father, by a lightning bolt of the god.[6]
  • Euaemon, son of King Ormenus of Ormenium[7] and thus, brother to Amyntor (otherwise also called his father). He was the father of Eurypylus[8] by Deipyle (Deityche)[9] or Ops.[10]
  • Euaemon, a city mentioned in Stephanus of Byzantium' s Ethnika, otherwise unknown

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Plato, Critias 113d
  2. ^ Plato, Critias 114a-c
  3. ^ Plato, Critias 114d
  4. ^ Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitates Romanae 1.13.1
  5. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 8.17.6
  6. ^ Apollodorus, 3.8.1
  7. ^ Homer, Iliad 10.254
  8. ^ Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 7.19.6, 7.19.10 & 10.27.2
  9. ^ Tzetzes, Allegories of the Iliad Prologue 619 - 620
  10. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 97

ReferencesEdit

  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Dionysus of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities. English translation by Earnest Cary in the Loeb Classical Library, 7 volumes. Harvard University Press, 1937-1950. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
  • Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitatum Romanarum quae supersunt, Vol I-IV. . Karl Jacoby. In Aedibus B.G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1885. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Gaius Julius Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. ISBN 978-0674995796. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. ISBN 978-0198145318. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Plato, Critias in Plato in Twelve Volumes, Vol. 9 translated by W.R.M. Lamb. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1925. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available at the same website.
  • Tzetzes, John, Allegories of the Iliad translated by Goldwyn, Adam J. and Kokkini, Dimitra. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, Harvard University Press, 2015. ISBN 978-0-674-96785-4


This article includes a list of Greek mythological figures with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific Greek mythology article referred you to this page, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended Greek mythology article, if one exists.