Fairchild 42

Summary

The Fairchild Model 41 Foursome was a light aircraft developed in the United States in the late 1920s and produced as the Model 42 Foursome. It was a conventional high-wing, strut-braced monoplane with fixed tailwheel undercarriage. The pilot and three passengers were seated within a fully enclosed cabin, and the aircraft generally resembled a scaled-down version of Fairchild's successful FC-2 design. Two prototypes were built as the Model 41 and Model 41A leading to the Model 42 production version which was built in a small series. This production version differed from the prototypes in having a redesigned, strut-braced empennage in place of the wire-braced unit of the earlier aircraft, and a more powerful version of the Wright Whirlwind powerplant.

Model 41 and Model 42 Foursome
Fairchild 41 Aero Digest January 1929.jpg
Model 41
Role Utility aircraft
Manufacturer Fairchild
Designer John Lee
First flight 19 November 1927
Number built 8

VariantsEdit

Model 41 Foursome
First prototype four seat cabin monoplane, powered by a 220 hp (160 kW) Wright J-5, one built
Model 41A Foursome
Second prototype four seat cabin monoplane, powered by a 300 hp (220 kW) Wright J-5, one built.
Model 42 Foursome
Production four seat cabin monoplane, powered by 330 hp (250 kW) Wright J-6 engines, six built and two converted from the 41 and 41A.

SurvivorsEdit

NC106M has been rebuilt to airworthy standard in Alaska as of July 2008, powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior and converted to seat 7 passengers, with rear round windows added. [1]


Specifications (Model 42)Edit

 
Fairchild 41 3 view drawing from Aero Digest January 1929

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Capacity: 3 passengers
  • Length: 30 ft 6 in (9.30 m)
  • Wingspan: 45 ft 6 in (13.86 m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright J-6 , 330 hp (246 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 130 mph (210 km/h, 110 kn)
  • Range: 700 mi (1,130 km, 610 nmi)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ skupniewitz, mike. "fairchild project". Archived from the original on 24 January 2013. Retrieved 8 November 2013.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 353.
  • aerofiles.com