Fluorine nitrate

Summary

Fluorine nitrate is an unstable derivative of nitric acid with the formula FNO
3
. It is shock-sensitive.[1] Due to its instability, it is often produced from chlorine nitrate as needed[citation needed].

Fluorine nitrate
Structural formulas of fluorine nitrate, showing its resonance structure
Ball-and-stick model of the fluorine nitrate molecule
Identifiers
  • 7789-26-6 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChemSpider
  • 109875
  • 123262
UNII
  • 1Q6BYH7F2B
  • DTXSID20228502 Edit this at Wikidata
  • InChI=1S/FNO3/c1-5-2(3)4
    Key: VHFBTKQOIBRGQP-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • FO[N+](=O)[O-]
Properties
FNO3
Molar mass 81.002 g·mol−1
Density 2.217 g/L[1]
Melting point −175 °C (−283.0 °F; 98.1 K)
Boiling point −46 °C (−51 °F; 227 K)
Thermochemistry
+10.46 kJ/mol
Hazards
Occupational safety and health (OHS/OSH):
Main hazards
Explosive gas
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Synthesis and propertiesEdit

Fluorine nitrate is formed when fluorine gas is bubbled through nitric acid or reacted with solid potassium nitrate:[2]

F2 + HNO3 → FNO3 + HF
F2 + KNO3 → FNO3 + KF

It decomposes in water to form oxygen gas, oxygen difluoride, hydrofluoric acid, and nitric acid.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Ruff, Otto; Kwasnik, Walter (1935). "The fluorination of nitric acid. The nitroxyfluoride, NO3F". Angewandte Chemie. 48: 238–240. doi:10.1002/ange.19350481604.
  2. ^ Yost, Don M.; Beerbower, Alan. "The Reaction of Fluorine with Nitric acid and with Solid Potassium Nitrate to Form NO3F". Communication. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)