Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street station

Summary

 4 Avenue/9 Street
 "F" train"G" train"R" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station complex
4 Av- 9 St- Bridge.jpg
Station statistics
AddressFourth Avenue & Ninth Street
Brooklyn, NY 11215[1]
BoroughBrooklyn
LocalePark Slope, Gowanus
Coordinates40°40′13″N 73°59′23″W / 40.67028°N 73.98972°W / 40.67028; -73.98972Coordinates: 40°40′13″N 73°59′23″W / 40.67028°N 73.98972°W / 40.67028; -73.98972
DivisionB (BMT/IND)
LineBMT Fourth Avenue Line
IND Culver Line
Services      D late nights (late nights)
      N late nights (late nights)
      R all times (all times)
      W limited rush hour service only (limited rush hour service only)​
      F all times (all times)
      G all times (all times)
Transit connectionsBus transport NYCT Bus: B61; B37 (on Third Avenue)
Bus transport MTA Bus: B103
Levels2
Station code608[2]
Traffic
Passengers (2019)3,924,882[3]Increase 0.5%
Rank125 out of 424[3]

Fourth Avenue/Ninth Street is a New York City Subway station complex shared by the elevated IND Culver Line and the underground BMT Fourth Avenue Line. It is located at the intersection of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue in Park Slope, Brooklyn and served by the:

  • F, G and R trains at all times
  • D and N trains late nights
  • W train during rush hours only, with some trips in the peak direction

The Ninth Street portion of the station was constructed as part of the Fourth Avenue Line, which was approved in 1905. Construction on the segment of the line that includes Union Street started on December 20, 1909, and was completed in September 1912. The station opened on June 22, 1915 as part of the initial portion of the BMT Fourth Avenue Line to 59th Street. The station's platforms were lengthened in 1926–1927,[4] and again in 1970.[5] The Fourth Avenue portion was built as part of the Culver Line of the city-operated Independent Subway System, and was constructed as an elevated station so the line could pass over the Gowanus Canal to the west. This station opened on October 7, 1933. The two stations were consolidated into a single station complex on May 28, 1959.

History

Fourth Avenue Line

Construction and opening

The Ninth Street station was constructed as part of the Fourth Avenue Line, and was the first part of this station complex to open. The plan for the line was initially adopted on June 1, 1905.[6] The Rapid Transit Commission was succeeded on July 1, 1907, by the New York State Public Service Commission (PSC), which approved the plan for the line in late 1907.[7][8] The contract for the section of the line that included the Ninth Street station, Route 11A2, which extended from 10th Street to Sackett Street, was awarded on May 22, 1908, to E.E. Smith Construction Company for $2,296,234.93 (equivalent to $65,341,000 in 2019). The New York City Board of Estimate approved the contract on October 29, 1909.[7][9] Construction on the segment started on December 20, 1909, and was completed in September 1912.[6]

As part of negotiations between New York City, the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT), and the Interborough Rapid Transit Company for the expansion of the city's transit network, the line was leased to a subsidiary of the BRT. The agreement, known as Contract 4 of the Dual Contracts, was signed on March 19, 1913.[7] Ninth Street opened on June 22, 1915, as part of an extension of the subway to Coney Island station, which included the Fourth Avenue Line north of 59th Street as well as the entire Sea Beach Line.[10][11] The station's opening was marked with a competition between two trains heading from Chambers Street station in Manhattan to the Coney Island station, one heading via the West End Line and the other via the Sea Beach Line; the latter got to Coney Island first.[11]

1920s platform extensions

On June 27, 1922, the New York State Transit Commission directed its engineers to prepare plans to lengthen the platforms at 23 stations on the lines of the Brooklyn–Manhattan Transit Corporation (BMT), the successor to the BRT, to accommodate eight-car trains. As part of the project, Ninth Street's platforms would have been lengthened from 435 feet (133 m) to 530 feet (160 m).[12][13] Though the Transit Commission ordered the BMT to lengthen these platforms in September 1923, progress on the extensions did not occur until February 16, 1925, when the New York City Board of Transportation (NYCBOT) directed its engineers to prepare plans to lengthen the platforms at this and eleven other stations along the Fourth Avenue Line. It estimated the project's cost to be $633,000 (equivalent to $9,228,000 in 2019).[14] The NYCBOT received bids for the project on February 25, 1926.[15] The contract was awarded to Corson Construction Company for $345,021 (equivalent to $4,983,000 in 2019).[16] The extensions opened on August 1, 1927.[4]

Culver Line

The Fourth Avenue station was constructed as part of the Culver (South Brooklyn) Line of the Independent Subway System (IND). One of the goals of Mayor John Hylan's IND, proposed in the 1920s, was a line to Coney Island, reached by a recapture of the BMT Culver Line.[17][18] As originally designed, service to and from Manhattan would have been exclusively provided by Culver express trains, while all local service would have fed into the IND Crosstown Line.[19]

In 1925, the IND finalized plans to build the line.[18] The line's path crossed the Gowanus Canal, and the IND originally wanted to build a deep-river tunnel under the canal. To save money, the IND built a viaduct over the canal instead, resulting in the creation of the only above-ground section of the original IND.[20][21] The first section of the line opened on March 20, 1933, from Jay Street to Bergen Street.[22] The line was extended from Bergen Street to Church Avenue on October 7, 1933, including the Fourth Avenue station.[23][24]

Station complex and subsequent years

A free transfer point was established between the two stations on May 28, 1959 to compensate for the loss of through Culver service via the Fourth Avenue Line.[25]

Fourth Avenue Line renovation

In July 1959, the New York City Transit Authority (NYCTA) announced that it would install fluorescent lighting at the Ninth Street station and five other stations along Fourth Avenue for between $175,000 and $200,000. Bids on the project were to be advertised on August 7, 1959 and completed by fall 1960.[26]

In the 1960s, the NYCTA started a project to lengthen station platforms on its lines in Southern Brooklyn to 615 feet (187 m) to accommodate 10-car trains.[5] On July 14, 1967, the NYCTA awarded a contract to conduct test borings at eleven stations on the Fourth Avenue Line, including Ninth Street, to W. M. Walsh Corporation for $6,585 (equivalent to $50,492 in 2019) in preparation of the construction of platform extensions.[27] The NYCTA issued an invitation for bids on the project to extend the platforms at stations along the Fourth Avenue Line between Pacific Street and 36th Street, including those at Ninth Street, on March 28, 1969.[28] Funding for the renovation projects came out of the NYCTA's 1969–1970 Capital Budget, costing $8,177,890 in total.[29]

As part of the renovation project, the station's platforms were extended,[5] and the station's elaborate mosaic tile walls were covered over with 8-by-16-inch (20 by 41 cm) white cinderblock tiles. The latter change, which was also made to 15 other stations on the BMT Broadway and Fourth Avenue Lines, was criticized for being dehumanizing. The NYCTA spokesman stated that the old tiles were in poor condition and that the change was made to improve the appearance of stations and provide uniformity. Furthermore, it did not consider the old mosaics to have "any great artistic merit".[30]

Culver Viaduct renovation

In 2007, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) announced a three-year renovation project of the elevated Culver Viaduct.[31] The work area covers from south of Carroll Street to north of Ditmas Avenue. For Phase 2A of the project, a temporary platform was built over the southbound express track to allow northbound trains to stop at the station. The platform was then removed for Phase 2B. For Phase 3A a temporary platform was built over the northbound express track to allow southbound trains to stop. Reconstruction of the Fourth Avenue station was completed in April 2013. As part of the project, the arch bridge over Fourth Avenue was restored with the elimination of billboards and the removal of paint over the windows.[32] The station received a public address system as part of the project. In addition, the MTA reopened the east station house to the station, after it had been closed for over 40 years.[33]

Before 2009, G service terminated at Smith–Ninth Streets, one stop to the north.[34] Terminating southbound trains used the switches just west of Fourth Avenue to enter the southbound express tracks. After being stored on the southbound express track, the G trains would start their Queens-bound runs by using the switches to enter the northbound local track.[35] The switches were taken out of regular service in 2009, when the viaduct's reconstruction started and the G was extended to Church Avenue.[36][34]

Station layout

2F
Culver platforms
Side platform
Northbound local "F" train toward 179th Street (Smith–Ninth Streets)
"G" train toward Court Square (Smith–Ninth Streets)
Northbound express "F" express train does not stop here
Southbound express "F" express train does not stop here →
Southbound local "F" train toward Coney Island (Seventh Avenue)
"G" train toward Church Avenue (Seventh Avenue)
Side platform
1F Mezzanine Connection between platforms, fare control, station agent, MetroCard machines
G Street level Exit/entrance
B1
Fourth Avenue platforms
East mezzanine Northbound fare control, MetroCard machines
Side platform
Northbound local "R" train toward 71st Avenue (Whitehall Street late nights) (Union Street)
"D" train toward 205th Street late nights (Union Street)
"N" train toward Ditmars Boulevard late nights (Union Street)
"W" train toward Ditmars Boulevard (select weekday trips) (Union Street)
Northbound express "D" train"N" train do not stop here
Southbound express "D" train"N" train do not stop here →
Southbound local "R" train toward 95th Street (Prospect Avenue)
"D" train"N" train toward Coney Island late nights (Prospect Avenue)
"W" train toward 86th Street (select weekday trips) (Prospect Avenue)
Side platform
West mezzanine Southbound fare control, MetroCard machines

Exits

Northeastern stairs next to the Church of the Holy Family
Exit location[37][38] Exit type Number of exits Platform served
West side of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms
East side of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets Staircase 1 Northbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms
NW corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
NE corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street Staircase 1 Northbound Fourth Avenue Line
NW corner of 4th Avenue and 10th Street (in viaduct) Staircase 1 Southbound Fourth Avenue Line
Both Culver Line platforms

The station has five entrances. There is one entrance each in the vestibules on both sides of 4th Avenue between 9th and 10th Streets. There is also an entrance on the north side of 10th Street west of Fourth Avenue, which leads to the southbound BMT Fourth Avenue Line and both IND Culver Line platforms. The other two are entrances on either northern corner of 4th Avenue and 9th Street, and lead directly to the BMT Fourth Avenue Line platforms.[37][38]

IND Culver Line platforms

 4 Avenue
 "F" train"G" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
4th Avenue - Manhattan-Queens Bound Platform.jpg
Manhattan/Queens-bound platform
Station statistics
DivisionB (IND)
LineIND Culver Line
Services      F all times (all times)
      G all times (all times)
StructureElevated
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedOctober 7, 1933; 86 years ago (1933-10-07)
Station code239[2]
Opposite-direction transfer availableYes
Station succession
Next northSmith–Ninth Streets: F all timesG all times
Next southSeventh Avenue: F all timesG all times
----
4th Avenue Station (IND)
MPSNew York City Subway System MPS
NRHP reference No.05000673[39]
Added to NRHPJuly 6, 2005
Track layout
Legend
Former siding
to 7 Av

Fourth Avenue is a local station on the IND Culver Line that has four tracks and two side platforms.[40] It is one of the only two elevated stations in the original IND system.[41]:3 The platforms are the IND's usual length of 660 feet (200 m), and the width of the platforms is 16 feet (4.9 m).[42] Both platforms have tan brick windscreens and column-less cantilevered windscreens along their entire lengths except for a small portion of the west (railroad north) end. Above Fourth Avenue, the platform walls consist of massive steel arches with glass panes; each arch is anchored between two limestone-and-brick piers, one on either side of the arch. Running along the top of the arches are straight brick piers with patterns.[41]:3 The windows were formerly painted over, and billboards affixed to the outside of each arch; these were removed in the 2012 renovation.[43][44]

The station has a crew quarters structure over both platforms which is constructed of buff brick with evidence of covered windows. These structures contain granite bases. Characteristic of the Art Deco style, the crew quarters towers contain small setbacks. Repeating chevron designs are located along the center of each tower, while limestone bands are located atop the parapets and setbacks on each tower.[41]:4

This station's fare control area is at street level underneath the platforms and tracks and built within the viaduct's concrete structure.[41]:4 Two staircases from each platform go down to an I-shaped mezzanine[41]:5 (where mosaics reading "MEN" and "WOMEN" for two now-closed restrooms are visible) before three staircases go down to the turnstile bank. Outside fare control, there is a token booth and two sets of entry/exit doors, one to the west side of Fourth Avenue directly underneath the viaduct and the other to the north side of Tenth Street. Both entrances have their original lit-up IND "SUBWAY" sign while mosaic direction tiles reading "To Coney Island" and "To Manhattan" are in the mezzanine.[41]:3–4 Storefronts are located inside the viaduct at ground level.[41]:5

The western fare control area has a single staircase going down to the extreme south end of the Bay Ridge-bound platform of Ninth Street on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line. The extreme east (railroad south) ends of each platform have a single staircase going down to the entrance to the east side of Fourth Avenue underneath the viaduct at ground level. Another staircase from this eastern landing goes down to the Manhattan-bound platform of Ninth Street. The staircase and mezzanine areas have yellow-tiled walls, with tile accents of green.[41]:5

West of this station was a short stub-end reversing spur entered only from this station. It remained level between the two express tracks while the other tracks ramped up toward Smith–Ninth Streets. The track was removed during overhaul of the Culver Viaduct from 2007 to 2013.[45][46] East of this station, the line enters a tunnel toward Seventh Avenue.[40] That station is underground, but at a higher altitude than this elevated station due to the steep slope of the land (hence the neighborhood name of Park Slope).[32]

Service patterns

The station was originally served by the A train. In 1936, the A was rerouted to the IND Fulton Street Line and was replaced by E trains from the Queens Boulevard Line.[23] In 1937, the connection to the IND Crosstown Line opened and GG (later renamed the G) trains were extended to Church Avenue, complementing the E. In December 1940, after the IND Sixth Avenue Line opened, E trains were replaced by the F, and the GG was cut back to Smith–Ninth Streets.[23] Following the completion of the Culver Ramp in 1954,[47][48] D Concourse Express trains replaced F service to Coney Island.[48][49] In November 1967, the Chrystie Street Connection opened and D trains were rerouted via the Manhattan Bridge and the BMT Brighton Line to Coney Island. F trains were extended once again via the Culver Line.[49][50]

The station acted as a local-only station from 1968 to 1976, when F trains ran express in both directions between Bergen Street and Church Avenue during rush hours.[51] G trains were extended from Smith–Ninth Streets to Church Avenue to provide local service.[52][19] Express service between Bergen and Church ended in 1976 due to budgetary concerns and passenger complaints, and the GG, later renamed the G, was again terminated at the Smith–Ninth Streets station.[52][19][53]

In July 2009, the G was extended from its long-time terminus at Smith–Ninth Streets to a more efficient terminus at Church Avenue to accommodate the rehabilitation of the Culver Viaduct.[52][34] The G extension was made permanent in July 2012.[54] In July 2019, the MTA revealed plans to restore express service on the Culver Line between Jay Street and Church Avenue. Express service started on September 16, 2019.[55][56]

Gallery

BMT Fourth Avenue Line platforms

 9 Street
 "R" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
9th Street BMT Fourth Avenue 1293.JPG
Platform towards Manhattan
Station statistics
DivisionB (BMT)
LineBMT Fourth Avenue Line
Services      D late nights (late nights)
      N late nights (late nights)
      R all times (all times)
      W limited rush hour service only (limited rush hour service only)
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedJune 22, 1915; 105 years ago (1915-06-22)[11]
Station code029[2]
Wireless serviceWi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[57]
Opposite-direction transfer availableYes
Station succession
Next northUnion Street: D late nightsN late nightsR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Next southProspect Avenue: D late nightsN late nightsR all timesW limited rush hour service only
Track layout
Legend

Ninth Street on the BMT Fourth Avenue Line is a local station that has four tracks and two side platforms.[40] White tiled curtain walls separate the express tracks from the local tracks.[58]

Beige columns run along both platforms at the station's northern end where they were extended in 1970. The ceiling is lower in this section.[59]

Prior to the station's 1970 renovation, it was finished all in white and marble tile, and it had its own color scheme to allow regular passengers to identify the station based only on the color of the marble trimmings.[7] Since the renovation, the station walls have consisted of white cinderblock tiles, except for small recesses in the walls, which contain yellow-painted cinderblock tiles. The yellow cinderblock field contains the station-name signs and black text pointing to the exits.[60]

Each platform has one same-level fare control area in the middle. The one on the Manhattan-bound platform has a turnstile bank, token booth, and one staircase going up to the northeast corner of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue. This fare control area still has the station's original trim line with "9" tablets at regular intervals.[61] The fare control area on the Bay Ridge-bound platform is unstaffed, containing one High Entry/Exit Turnstile, one exit-only turnstile, a row of four low turnstiles, and a staircase to the northwest corner of Ninth Street and Fourth Avenue.[62]

At the extreme south end of both platforms, staircases lead up to exit/entrance areas at street level.[41]:5 The exit/entrance area on the Manhattan-bound (eastern) side of the station was closed for around 40 years before being reopened in February 2012.[44] On each side, staircases go up to either of the IND platforms at Fourth Avenue.[41]:5

References

  1. ^ "Borough of Brooklyn, New York City". Government of New York City. Retrieved April 16, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  3. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2014–2019". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2020. Retrieved May 26, 2020.
  4. ^ a b "B.M.T. Stations Ready For Eight-Car Trains". Brooklyn Standard Union. August 1, 1927. p. 1. Retrieved April 9, 2020 – via newspapers.com open access.
  5. ^ a b c New York City Transit Authority Annual Report For The Year June 30, 1960. New York City Transit Authority. 1960. pp. 16–17.
  6. ^ a b Rogoff, David (May 1961). "The Fourth Ave. Subway". New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association: 2–10. Retrieved May 8, 2017.
  7. ^ a b c d Fourth Avenue Subway, Brooklyn's New Transportation Line: A Part of the Dual System of Rapid Transit of the City of New York. Public Service Commission. June 19, 1915. p. 18.
  8. ^ "Fourth Avenue Subway Is Sent To A Committee". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. March 20, 1908. pp. 1–2. Retrieved May 4, 2017 – via newspapers.com open access.
  9. ^ "Fourth Avenue Subway To Be Political Issue". The Brooklyn Daily Eagle. December 11, 1908. p. 1. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  10. ^ Cudahy, Brian J. (2009). How We Got to Coney Island: The Development of Mass Transportation in Brooklyn and Kings County. Fordham University Press. pp. 217–218. ISBN 978-0-8232-2211-7. Retrieved April 24, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c "Through Tube to Coney, 48 Minutes: First Train on Fourth Avenue Route Beats West End Line Eleven Minutes". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. June 22, 1915. Retrieved June 29, 2015 – via newspapers.com open access.
  12. ^ Legislature, New York (State) (1923). Second Annual Report of the Transit Commission (For the Calendar Year 1922). New York State Transit Commission. p. 100.
  13. ^ Proceedings of the Transit Commission, State of New York Volume III From January 1 to December 31, 1923. New York State Transit Commission. 1923. p. 1277.
  14. ^ "12 B-M. T. Stations To Be Lengthened; Transportation Board Orders Engineers to Prepare Contracts for Brooklyn Work. Cost Put At $633,000 Letter to Commission Urges That Company Be Compelled to Buy New Cars". The New York Times. February 17, 1925. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved May 4, 2017.
  15. ^ "Board Receives Platform Bids For B.M.T. Lines. Six Companies Submit Prices for Extending Subway Stations". The Brooklyn Citizen. February 26, 1926. p. 5. Retrieved April 7, 2020 – via newspapers.com open access.
  16. ^ "Brooklyn Wins Big Improvement Fund". Brooklyn Standard Union. March 18, 1926. p. 20. Retrieved April 7, 2020 – via newspapers.com open access.
  17. ^ "Plan to Recapture Culver Line Ready" (PDF). The New York Times. July 12, 1932. p. 9. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  18. ^ a b "New Subway Routes in Hylan Program to Cost $186,046,000" (PDF). The New York Times. March 21, 1925. p. 1. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 27, 2020.
  19. ^ a b c Feasibility and Analysis of F Express Service in Brooklyn (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Report). May 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on May 27, 2016. Retrieved June 24, 2016.
  20. ^ "Gay Midnight Crowd Rides First Trains in New Subway" (PDF). New York Times. September 10, 1932. p. 1. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
  21. ^ "Submits New Plan For Brooklyn Tube; Transportation Board Says Revised Project Would Save the City $12,000,000, No Tunnel Under Canal Bridge Over Gowanus Stream and Enclosed Viaduct Now Is Proposed". The New York Times. July 17, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  22. ^ "City Subway Adds Link.; Extension to Bergen-Smith Street Station in Brooklyn Opened". The New York Times. March 21, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  23. ^ a b c "Independent Subway Services Beginning in 1932". thejoekorner.com. August 21, 2013. Archived from the original on November 22, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
    Information adapted from:
    • New York Division Bulletin (Report) (October and November 1968 ed.). Electric Railroaders’ Association, Inc. Fall 1968.
  24. ^ "City Subway Extended" (PDF). The New York Times. October 7, 1933. p. 16. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  25. ^ Linder, Bernard (August 1966). "Culver Shuttle". New York Division Bulletin. Electric Railroaders' Association.
  26. ^ "Our Subway Stations To Be Brighter". Bay Ridge Home Reporter. July 10, 1959. p. 2. Retrieved April 7, 2020 – via newspapers.com open access.
  27. ^ Minutes and Proceedings. New York City Transit Authority. 1967. pp. 379–380.
  28. ^ Engineering News-record. McGraw-Hill. 1969. p. 63.
  29. ^ Proceedings of the New York City Transit Authority Relating to Matters Other Than Operation. New York City Transit Authority. 1969. pp. 280, 435, 487.
  30. ^ Burks, Edward C. (February 21, 1970). "Subways' Colored Tile Gets Cover‐Up Job". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 7, 2020.
  31. ^ McLaughlin, Mike (November 24, 2007). "Fix for Fourth Avenue station looks F'ing great". The Brooklyn Paper. Retrieved November 27, 2007.
  32. ^ a b "Culver Line Rehabilitation: Presentation to Community Board 6 Transportation Committee – November 15, 2007" (PDF). secondavenusagas.com. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. November 15, 2007. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 7, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2015.
  33. ^ "4th Avenue East Side Station House Reopens". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. February 23, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2012.
  34. ^ a b c Review of the G Line (PDF). mta.info (Report). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 10, 2013. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 24, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  35. ^ "Review of the G Line: Appendices" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 10, 2013. Retrieved October 28, 2015.
  36. ^ "MTA NYC Transit - Service Advisory". mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 2009. Archived from the original on July 9, 2009. Retrieved October 30, 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  37. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Red Hook" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  38. ^ a b "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Park Slope" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved August 2, 2015.
  39. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 24, 2011.
  40. ^ a b c Dougherty, Peter (2006) [2002]. Tracks of the New York City Subway 2006 (3rd ed.). Dougherty. OCLC 49777633 – via Google Books.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Historic Structures Report: 4th Avenue Subway Station (IND)" (PDF). National Register of Historic Places, National Park Service. July 6, 2005. Retrieved February 2, 2020.
  42. ^ Kramer, Frederick A. (January 1, 1990). Building the Independent Subway. Quadrant Press. ISBN 9780915276509.
  43. ^ "After Over 40 Years, MTA Reopens 4th Avenue-9th Street Station House". Gothamist. February 23, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  44. ^ a b "Subway Entrance At 4th Ave. and 9th St. Reopens After 40 Years". Brooklyn Eagle. February 23, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2020.
  45. ^ Anastasio, Joseph (February 21, 2011). "Highest Lowpoint". LTV Squad. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  46. ^ King, Nicole. "Disused center trackway on viaduct". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  47. ^ "NYCTA- Pass for Culver Line Ceremonies - 1954". flickr.com. New York City Transit Authority. 1954. Retrieved August 14, 2016.
  48. ^ a b "Adequate Transit Promised For City" (PDF). The New York Times. October 29, 1954. p. 25. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  49. ^ a b Sparberg, Andrew J. (October 1, 2014). From a Nickel to a Token: The Journey from Board of Transportation to MTA. Fordham University Press. ISBN 978-0-8232-6190-1.
  50. ^ Perlmutter, Emanuel (November 16, 1967). "Subway Changes To Speed Service" (PDF). The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  51. ^ "'F' Line Rush-Hour Service Will Be Added in Brooklyn" (PDF). The New York Times. June 8, 1969. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 26, 2016.
  52. ^ a b c Review of F Line Operations, Ridership, and Infrastructure (PDF). nysenate.gov (Report). MTA New York City Transit Authority. October 7, 2009. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 31, 2010. Retrieved July 28, 2015.
  53. ^ Geberer, Raanan (March 6, 2013). "Light at End of Tunnel: F Train Express may return". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. Archived from the original on March 27, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2015.
  54. ^ Flegenheimer, Matt (July 19, 2012). "M.T.A. Subway, Train and Bus Services to be Restored". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 23, 2018.
  55. ^ Barone, Vincent (July 9, 2019). "Limited F express service coming to Brooklyn for rush hour". AMNY. Archived from the original on October 3, 2019. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  56. ^ "MTA NYC Transit Adding Limited F Express Service for Brooklyn Residents with Longest Commutes" (Press release). New York City Transit. July 10, 2019. Archived from the original on September 14, 2019. Retrieved July 10, 2019.
  57. ^ "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved November 13, 2019.
  58. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (June 29, 2009). "Looking back down the Bensonhurst/Bay Ridge-bound side platform, with the white tiled wall between it and the express track at 9th Street". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  59. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (October 21, 2005). "Looking down the ended portion of the platform at 9th Street, its extreme northern end where platform columns are and the ceiling is lower". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  60. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (October 21, 2005). "A 9 Street platform sign on a portion of the platform wall that's painted with Exit next to an arrow beneath it directing passengers to the station's exit. This text beneath the station's signs don't acknowledge the transfer to the IND and the F train at all". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  61. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (June 29, 2009). "More relics of the original station from the 1910s, terra-cotta reliefs above doors, probably where public restrooms used to be, an old and off incandescent light fixture, and a visible portion of the station's original trim-line at 9th Street". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.
  62. ^ Cox, Jeremiah (November 1, 2012). "The gate is open, high entrance turnstile still on at the exit directly on the Bay Ridge-bound platform". subwaynut.com. Retrieved December 18, 2018.

External links

  • nycsubway.org – IND Crosstown: 4th Avenue
  • nycsubway.org – BMT 4th Avenue: 9th Street
  • Station Reporter — 4th Avenue/Ninth Street Complex
  • The Subway Nut — 9th Street (M, R) Pictures
  • The Subway Nut — 4th Avenue (F, G) Pictures
  • Ninth Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • Fourth Avenue west entrance under viaduct from Google Maps Street View
  • Fourth Avenue east entrance under viaduct from Google Maps Street View
  • Other entrance on 10th Street from Google Maps Street View
  • IND platforms from Google Maps Street View
  • BMT platform from Google Maps Street View