GOES-U

Summary

GOES-U
NamesGeostationary Operational Environmental Satellite-U
Mission typeEarth weather forecasting
OperatorNOAA / NASA
Mission duration15 years (planned)
Spacecraft properties
BusA2100
ManufacturerLockheed Martin
Launch mass2800 kg
Start of mission
Launch date2024 (planned)
Launch siteCape Canaveral
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit
RegimeGeostationary orbit
← GOES-T
 

GOES-U is a planned weather satellite, the fourth and last of the GOES-R series of satellites operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The GOES-R series will extend the availability of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) system until 2036. The satellite will be built by Lockheed Martin, based on the A2100 platform.[1]

Launch

The satellite is expected to be launched into space sometime in 2024 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida, United States.[2][3] The redesign of the loop heat pipe to prevent an anomaly, as seen in GOES-17, is not expected to delay the launch as it did with GOES-T.[4]

GOES-U will also carry a copy of the Naval Research Laboratory's Compact CORonagraph (CCOR) instrument which, along with the CCOR planned for Space Weather Follow On-Lagrange 1 (SWFO-L1), will allow continued monitoring of solar wind after the retirement of the NASA-ESA European Space Agency SOHO satellite in 2025.[5][6]

It will have a mass of 2,800 kg (6,200 lb).[7]

References

  1. ^ Mission overview; GOES-R Retrieved 28 November 2016 This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ Our Satellites NOAA, Retrieved 5 March 2017 This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ "Lockheed Martin halts work on GOES-T to wait for instrument fix". SpaceNews.com. 9 January 2019. Retrieved 26 May 2019.
  4. ^ Vargas, Marco (7 January 2019). "The NOAA Space Weather Follow-On Program to Ensure Continuity of CME Imagery and Solar Wind Space-Based Observations". American Meteorilogical Society 99th Annual Meeting. AMS. Retrieved 24 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Space Weather Follow On-Lagrange 1". nesdis.noaa.gov. NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS). Retrieved 24 March 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ Ray, Justin (22 August 2016). "Sophisticated new U.S. weather observatory being readied for launch". Spaceflight Now. Retrieved 19 October 2016.