Gaylord Graves

Summary

Gaylord Graves
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Walworth County[1] district
In office
June 5, 1848 – August 21, 1848
Preceded byNone
Personal details
Born(1804-05-22)May 22, 1804
Richfield Springs, New York
DiedAugust 29, 1889(1889-08-29) (aged 85)
Northwood, Iowa
Resting placeSunset Rest Cemetery, Northwood, Iowa[2]
Political partyDemocrat

Gaylord Graves (May 22, 1804 – August 29, 1889) was a member of the Wisconsin State Assembly.[3]

Biography

Graves was born on May 22, 1804 in Richfield Springs, New York.[4] On June 18, 1824, he married Nancy Tuckerman. They would have five children before her death on January 5, 1845. On March 15, 1848, Graves married Keziah Freeman. She died the following spring. His last wife was Mary Ann.

Graves moved to East Troy, Wisconsin Territory in 1836. In 1855, Graves moved to Iowa and settled near Des Moines. In 1859, Graves settled in Emmet County, Iowa. He died on August 29, 1889 in Northwood, Iowa.[5]

Career

Graves was a member of the 1st Wisconsin Legislature in 1848.[1] Previously, he had been a member of the Wisconsin Territorial Legislature in the Wisconsin Territorial House of Representatives in 1846.[6][1] Other positions Graves held include town supervisor and Walworth County, Wisconsin supervisor. He was a Democrat.

References

  1. ^ a b c "First Session of the State Legislature - Assembly" (PDF). Wisconsin Blue Book: 200. 1872.
  2. ^ "Graves, Gaylord". Works Progress Administration grave survey via iowawpagraves.org.
  3. ^ "One of the Pioneers". St. Paul Globe. April 5, 1888. p. 1. Retrieved August 25, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  4. ^ History of Walworth County, Wisconsin. Chicago: Western Historical Company. 1882. p. 529. Retrieved 2015-06-18.
  5. ^ "Death of Hon. Gaylord Graves". Northern Vindicator. Iowa. September 13, 1889. p. 1. The death of Gaylord Graves, which occurred at Northwood, Iowa, Thursday, August 29, 1889, removes another of the "old guard" who helped to lay the foundations of civilization in the "New West."
  6. ^ 'The Legislative Manual of the State of Wisconsin 1877,' pg. 147, 154

External links