History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-792
Ordered: 7 August 1942
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg
Yard number: 707
Laid down: 1 December 1942
Launched: 28 September 1943
Commissioned: 16 November 1943
Fate: Scuttled on 4 May 1945
General characteristics
Class and type: Type XVIIA submarine
Displacement:
  • 277 t (273 long tons) surfaced
  • 309 t (304 long tons) submerged
  • 373 t (367 long tons) total
Length:
Beam:
  • 4.50 m (14 ft 9 in) o/a
  • 3.30 m (10 ft 10 in) pressure hull
Draught: 4.30 m (14 ft 1 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph) surfaced
  • 5 knots (9.3 km/h; 5.8 mph) submerged (electric drive)
  • 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph) submerged (HTP drive)
Range:
  • 2,910 nmi (5,390 km; 3,350 mi) at 8.5 knots (15.7 km/h; 9.8 mph) surfaced
  • 50 nmi (93 km; 58 mi) at 2 knots (3.7 km/h; 2.3 mph) submerged (electric drive)
  • 127 nmi (235 km; 146 mi) at 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) submerged (HTP drive)
Complement: 12
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
Operations: No Patrols
Victories: None

U-792 was a Type XVIIA U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during the Second World War. She was one of a small number of U-boats fitted with Hellmuth Walter's high test peroxide propulsion system, which offered a combination of air-independent propulsion and high submerged speeds. She spent the war as a trials vessel and was scuttled on 4 May 1945 in the Audorfer See, near Rendsburg.[1]

Construction

The U-792 was laid down on 1 December 1942 at the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg, Germany. She was launched on 28 September 1943 and commissioned on 16 November 1943 under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Horst Heitz.[1]

When she was completed, the submarine was 39.05 metres (128 ft 1 in) long overall, with a beam of 4.50 metres (14 ft 9 in) and a draught of 4.30 metres (14 ft 1 in). She was assessed at 309 t (304 long tons) submerged. The submarine was powered by one Deutz SAA SM517 supercharged 8-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine producing a total of 210 metric horsepower (150 kW; 210 shp) for use while surfaced and two Walter gas turbines producing a total of 5,000 metric horsepower (3,700 kW; 4,900 shp) for use while submerged. She had one shaft and one 1.23 m (4 ft) propeller. The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 25 knots (46 km/h; 29 mph) when submerged, the U-boat could operate for 127 nautical miles (235 km; 146 mi) at 20 knots (37 km/h; 23 mph) and when surfaced, she could travel 1.840 nautical miles (3.408 km; 2.117 mi) at 9 knots (17 km/h; 10 mph).[2]

The submarine was fitted with two 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (All fitted at the bow) and four torpedoes. The boat had a complement of 12 men.[2][3]

Service History And End

U-792 did not undertake any combat patrols and was instead assigned as a trials boat at first to the 5th U-boat Flotilla, followed by the 8th U-boat Flotilla, before returning to the 5th flotilla for the rest of the war and was used in March 1945 as a floating fuel bunker. In December 1944, her commander was replaced by Oberleutnant zur See Hans Diederich Duis.[4]

The U-792 was scuttled on 4 May 1945 at 01:30 in the Audorfer See (Kaiser Wilhelm Canal), near Rendsburg during Operation Regenbogen.[1]

Wreck

The wreck of U-792 lay at 54°19′N 09°43′E / 54.317°N 9.717°E / 54.317; 9.717 until 26 May 1945, when she was lifted by the British and taken to the Howaldtswerke in Kiel to be examined. She was first raised as a British prize and used for trials, but was soon torn down for parts and finally scrapped. Her real final fate is still unknown as it is believed that she wasn't scrapped.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b c Helgason, Guðmundur (1995). "U-792". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 8 April 2016.
  2. ^ a b Gröner 1991, pp. 80-81.
  3. ^ "U-792 (+1945)". wrecksite.eu. 29 November 2009. Retrieved 8 April 2016.
  4. ^ a b Hofmann, Markus (21 September 2014). "U-792". Deutsche U-Boote 1935-1945 - u-boot-archiv.de (in German). Retrieved 8 April 2016.

Bibliography

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). German U-boat commanders of World War II : a biographical dictionary. Translated by Brooks, Geoffrey. London, Annapolis, Md: Greenhill Books, Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-186-6.
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.