HATS-36b

Summary

HATS-36 b
HATS-36 b infrared spectographic, 2018.png
An image of HATS-36 taken using the Kepler Space Telescope
Discovery[1]
Discovery dateJune 12, 2017
Transit
Designations
K2-145 b or EPIC 215969174b
Orbital characteristics[2]
0.0529 (± 0.0011) AU
Eccentricity0.105 ± 0.028
4.17524 (± 2.1×10−6) day
Inclination87.57 (± 0.36)°
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
1.235 ± 0.043 RJ
Mass2.79 ± 0.40 MJ

HATS-36b is a gas giant exoplanet that orbits an F-type star. Its mass is 3.216 Jupiters, it takes 4.2 days to complete one orbit of its star, and is 0.05425 AU from it. It was discovered on June 12, 2017 and was announced in 2018.[3][4] Its discoverers were 23, namely Daniel Bayliss, Joel Hartman, George Zhou, Gaspar Á. Bakos, Andrew Vanderburg, J. Bento, L. Mancini, S. Ciceri, Rafael Brahm, Andres Jordán, N. Espinoza, M. Rabus, T. G. Tan, K. Penev, W. Bhatti, M. de Val-Borro, V. Suc, Z. Csubry, Th. Henning, P. Sarkis, J. Lázár, I. Papp, P. Sári.[5]

Overview

The exoplanet HATS-36 b which orbits the star HATS-36 is located about 3,186.5 light-years (977 parsecs) away from Solar System. It is situated in the constellation of Sagittarius. The host star HATS-36 has apparent magnitude of 14.4, with absolute magnitude of 4.4. The surface temperature is 5970 K with its spectral types of G0V class. In this planetary system, the extra-solar planet orbits around the star HATS-36 every 4.17524 days with its orbital distance of 0.05 AU (7.5 million km).[4]

Discovery

After the discovery of HATS-36b, it became one of the 25 HATSouth candidates on Campaign 7 of the K2 mission. It detects that the exoplanet, a hot Jupiter-like planet with a mass of 2.790.40 MJ and a radius of 1.2630.045 RJ, transits a solar-type G0V star (V = 14.386) in a 4.17524-day period. The planetary system of HATS-36 is classified as an eclipsing binary system based on a combination of the HATSouth data, the K2 data, and follow-up ground-based photometry and spectroscopy.[5][6]

Discussion

HATS-36b has a typical orbital period of 4.1752379 ± 0.0000021 days and has a density of 2.12 ± 0.20 g/cm3. Its star is active, which can be seen and manifested in both the variability in the LC and the high jitters in the radial velocity measurements. Due to its high mass compared with the known population of hot Jupiters, HATS-36b lies in a relatively sparsely populated region of the mass-density relationship for gas giant exoplanets. However, its bulk density fits well on the mass-density sequence of the related exoplanets.[5]

See also

References

  1. ^ Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Bakos, G. Á.; Vanderburg, A.; Bento, J.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R.; Jordán, A.; Espinoza, N.; Rabus, M.; Tan, T. G.; Penev, K.; Bhatti, W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Suc, V.; Csubry, Z.; Henning, Th.; Sarkis, P.; Lázár, J.; Papp, I.; Sári, P. (2017). "HATS-36b and 24 Other Transiting/Eclipsing Systems from the HATSouth-K2 Campaign 7 Program". The Astronomical Journal. 155 (3): 119. arXiv:1706.03858. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa8e6. S2CID 119383417.
  2. ^ http://exoplanet.eu/catalog/hats-36_b/
  3. ^ "HATS-36 b | New World Atlas - Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System". Exoplanet Exploration: Planets Beyond our Solar System. Retrieved 2018-07-05.
  4. ^ a b "HAT-36 b". www.exoplanetkyoto.org. Retrieved 2018-07-05.
  5. ^ a b c Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Bakos, G. Á; Vanderburg, A.; Bento, J.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R. (2017-06-12). "HATS-36b and 24 Other Transiting/Eclipsing Systems from the HATSouth-K2 Campaign 7 Program". The Astronomical Journal. 155 (3): 119. arXiv:1706.03858. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa8e6. S2CID 119383417.
  6. ^ Bayliss, D.; Hartman, J. D.; Zhou, G.; Bakos, G. Á; Vanderburg, A.; Bento, J.; Mancini, L.; Ciceri, S.; Brahm, R. (2018). "HATS-36b and 24 Other Transiting/Eclipsing Systems from the HATSouth-K2 Campaign 7 Program". The Astronomical Journal. 155 (3): 119. arXiv:1706.03858. Bibcode:2018AJ....155..119B. doi:10.3847/1538-3881/aaa8e6. ISSN 1538-3881. S2CID 119383417.