Holodomor Memorial to Victims of the Ukrainian Famine-Genocide of 1932–1933
Field of Wheat (memorial).jpg
Holodomor Genocide Memorial is located in Central Washington, D.C.
Holodomor Genocide Memorial
Location in Central Washington, D.C.
Holodomor Genocide Memorial is located in the District of Columbia
Holodomor Genocide Memorial
Holodomor Genocide Memorial (the District of Columbia)
Holodomor Genocide Memorial is located in the United States
Holodomor Genocide Memorial
Holodomor Genocide Memorial (the United States)
Coordinates38°53′51″N 77°00′34″W / 38.8974°N 77.0095°W / 38.8974; -77.0095Coordinates: 38°53′51″N 77°00′34″W / 38.8974°N 77.0095°W / 38.8974; -77.0095
LocationWashington, D.C., United States
DesignerLarysa Kurylas
Typesculpture
Opening dateNovember 7, 2015
Websiteukrainegenocide.com

The Holodomor Memorial to Victims of the Ukrainian Famine-Genocide of 1932–1933 was opened in Washington, D.C., United States on November 7, 2015.[1][2] Located at the intersection of North Capitol Street, Massachusetts Avenue, and F Streets N.W., the memorial was built by the National Park Service and the Ukrainian government to honor the victims of the Ukrainian Famine-Genocide of 1932–33 and educate the American public.[3] The memorial is one of three monuments in Washington, D.C. designed or co-designed by women (the others being the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial.)[4] Congress approved creation of the Holodomor Memorial in 2006.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Holodomor Memorial presented in Washington". UNIAN. August 5, 2015. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  2. ^ Andrea K. McDaniels (November 7, 2015). "Organizers, including Timonium man, hope to educate with Ukrainian memorial in D.C." The Baltimore Sun. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  3. ^ "Holodomor Memorial to Victims of the Ukrainian Famine-Genocide of 1932–1933". Retrieved April 29, 2016.
  4. ^ Dietsch, Deborah K. (July 24, 2014). "Local architect designs Washington memorial to victims of genocidal famine in Ukraine". Retrieved January 28, 2018 – via www.WashingtonPost.com.
  5. ^ "Holodomor Memorial Dedication Ceremony". Retrieved April 29, 2016.