Hybris (mythology)

Summary

Hybris
Personification of Insolence
AbodeErebus
Personal information
ParentsNyx and Erebus[1] or
Dyssebeia[2]
SiblingsMoros, Keres, Thanatos, Hypnos, Oneiroi, Momus, Oizys, Moirai, Nemesis, Apate, Philotes, Geras, Eris, Hesperides, Styx, Dolos, Ponos, Euphrosyne, Epiphron, Continentia, Misericordia, Pertinacia
OffspringKoros
Equivalents
Roman equivalentPetulantia

Hybris[pronunciation?] (Ancient Greek: Ὕβρις means 'hubris') was a spirit (daemon) or goddess of insolence, violence, and outrageous behaviour. In Roman mythology, the personification was Petulantia who reflected the Greek conception of hubris.[citation needed]

Family

Hybris was the daughter of the primodial gods, Nyx (Night) and Erebus (Darkness)[3] or of Aether (Air) and Gaea (Earth).[4] In some accounts, her mother was Dyssebia (Impiety).[5]

Aeschylus' account

I have a timely word of advice: arrogance (hybris) is truly the child of impiety (dyssebia), but from health of soul comes happiness, dear to all, much prayed for.[6]

Hyginus' account

From Nox/ Nyx (Night) and Erebus [were born]: Fatum/ Moros (Fate), Senectus/ Geras (Old Age), Mors/ Thanatos (Death), Letum/ Ker (Dissolution), Continentia (Moderation), Somnus/ Hypnos (Sleep), Somnia/ Oneiroi (Dreams), Amor/ Eros (Love)--that is Lysimeles, Epiphron (Prudence), Porphyrion, Epaphus, Discordia/ Eris (Discord), Miseria/ Oizys (Misery), Petulantia/ Hybris (Wantonness), Nemesis (Envy), Euphrosyne (Good Cheer), Amicitia/ Philotes (Friendship), Misericordia/ Eleos (Compassion), Styx (Hatred); the three Parcae/ Moirai (Fates), namely Clotho, Lachesis and Atropos; the Hesperides.[7]

Notes

  1. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as Petulantia
  2. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 533.
  3. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Petulantia
  4. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Superbia
  5. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 533.
  6. ^ Aeschylus, Eumenides 532–534. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae Preface as the goddess Petulantia Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.

References

  • Aeschylus, translated in two volumes. 2. Eumenides by Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D. Cambridge, MA. Harvard University Press. 1926. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Gaius Julius Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.