IX Tactical Air Command

Summary


The IX Tactical Air Command was a formation of the United States Army Air Forces. It fought in the European theater of World War II. Its last assignment was at Camp Shanks, New York, where it was inactivated on 25 October 1945.

IX Tactical Air Command
392d Fighter Squadron Lockheed P-38G-10-LO Lightning 42-12982.jpg
P-38 Lightning of a command unit[note 1]
Active1943-1945
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
RoleCommand of fighter bomber units
EngagementsEuropean theater of World War II[1]
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Maj Gen Elwood Richard Quesada

HistoryEdit

Formed in the United Kingdom during 1943 as the IX Air Support Command, its primary role was to provide close air support for the U.S. First Army. Re-designated as the IX Tactical Air Command in April 1944, its initial missions included interdicting transportation, disrupting communications and destroying warehouses and supply dumps in occupied France and the Low Countries in preparation for the Normandy Invasion in June. Targets included bridges, road junctions, railroads, airfields, radio towers and telephone exchanges. Engaging enemy aircraft in the air and establishing air superiority was another priority.

After the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944, IX Tactical Air Command Republic P-47 Thunderbolts concentrated on enemy targets in the Cotentin Peninsula area and afterward supported Operation Cobra, the breakout of Normandy. Paying particular attention to German forces in the Falaise-Argentan Gap, targets were expanded to include tanks, vehicles of all types and troop formations. Many times targets of opportunity on the ground were spontaneously attacked when spotted. Coordinated attacks were made with Allied ground forces, especially when they were being held up by strong defenses. Thunderbolts dropped bombs at low level, made rocket attacks and strafed enemy positions with demoralizing effect.

Wing headquarters and subordinate units operated primarily from liberated airfields and temporary Advanced Landing Grounds. Moving into north-central France, its groups attacked enemy targets near Paris and then concentrated its activity north-west across Belgium and into the southern Netherlands. In December 1944 and January 1945 it engaged targets on the north flank of the Battle of the Bulge, then concentrated eastward into the Northern Rhineland as part of the Western Allied invasion of Germany.

The First Army was closely supported as it crossed the Rhine River at Remagen after which attacks were made on ground targets in the Ruhr district where air support was given to Allied forces that had encircled a large concentration of German troops in the Ruhr Pocket. That operation essentially ended organized enemy resistance in western Germany. The First Army halted its advance at the Elbe River in late April 1945 after which the wing engaged targets of opportunity in enemy-controlled areas until the fighting ended on 5 May 1945.

The IX Tactical Air Command remained in Europe after the war as part of United States Air Forces in Europe (USAFE), performing occupation duty and the destruction or shipment to the United States of captured enemy combat equipment. Assigned units also performed air defense duty over the American Zone of Occupation. It returned to the United States and was inactivated during October 1945.

LineageEdit

  • Constituted as the IX Air Support Command on 29 November 1943
Activated on 4 December 1943
Redesignated IX Tactical Air Command c. 24 April 1944
Inactivated on 25 October 1945
Disbanded on 8 October 1948[1]

AssignmentsEdit

ComponentsEdit

Wings
Groups
Squadrons
Other

StationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

Explanatory notes
  1. ^ Aircraft is Lockheed P-38G-10-LO Lightning, serial 42-12982 of the 367th Fighter Group.
Citations
  1. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Units, p. 448
  2. ^ Ream, Margaret (5 October 2020). "Factsheet Ninth Air Force (Air Forces Central) (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 20 December 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Maurer, Combat Units, p. 448 (year only).
  4. ^ Robertson, Patsy (16 December 2008). "Factsheet 404 Air Expeditionary Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
  5. ^ Robertson, Patsy (5 July 2017). "Factsheet 36 Operations Group (PACAF)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 30 December 2021.
  6. ^ Robertson, Patsy E. (7 July 2017). "Factsheet 48 Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  7. ^ Robertson, Patsy (10 July 2017). "Factsheet 50 Operations Group (AFSPC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  8. ^ Ream, Margaret (21 March 2021). "Factsheet 67 Cyberspace Operations Group (AFSPC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  9. ^ Dollman, TSG David. (18 October 2016). "Factsheet 366 Operations Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 13 January 2022.
  10. ^ Hauman, Daniel L. (21 November 2014). "Factsheet 405 Air Expeditionary Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 17 January 2022.
  11. ^ Dollman, TSG David (5 August 2016). "Factsheet 4 Air Support Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 14 January 2022.
  12. ^ Robertson, Patsy (31 July 2009). "Factsheet 6 Combat Training Squadron (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 4 July 2018.
  13. ^ Dollman, TSG David (16 May 2019). "Factsheet 11 Air Support Operations Squadron (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 15 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  14. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 184
  15. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 352
  16. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 355
  17. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 518-519
  18. ^ Lacomia, John M. (29 April 2018). "Factsheet 521 Air Mobility Operations Wing (AMC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 16 January 2022.
  19. ^ Station number in Anderson, p. 31.
  20. ^ Station number in Anderson, p. 28.
  21. ^ Station number in Johnson, p. 77.
  22. ^ Station number in Johnson, p. 54.
  23. ^ Station information in Maurer, Combat Units, p. 448, except as noted.

BibliographyEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  • Anderson, Capt. Barry (1985). Army Air Forces Stations: A Guide to the Stations Where U.S. Army Air Forces Personnel Served in the United Kingdom During World War II (PDF). Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Retrieved 1 March 2021.
  • Johnson, 1st Lt. David C. (1988). U.S. Army Air Forces Continental Airfields (ETO) D-Day to V-E Day (PDF). Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (PDF) (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. LCCN 61060979. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (PDF) (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. Retrieved 17 December 2016.

External linksEdit

  • Stars and Stripes, Achtung Jabos! The Story of the IX TAC (World War II Stars & Stripes unit history)