Ilioneus

Summary

In Greek mythology, the name Ilioneus (Ancient Greek: Ἰλιονεύς Īlioneus) may refer to:

  • Ilioneus, one of the Niobids.[1]
  • Ilioneus, a Trojan, an only son of Phorbas, was killed by Peneleos.[2]
  • Ilioneus, a Trojan elder, who implored Diomedes to spare him, but was killed nevertheless.[3]
  • Ilioneus, a companion of Aeneas. He was one of those whose ships sank during the storm in which Aeneas and his people were caught.[4] Being the eldest of the Trojan survivors with Aeneas, he was the first to speak to Dido when they entered her palace at Carthage.[5]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses 6.261
  2. ^ Homer, Iliad 14.489-495
  3. ^ Quintus Smyrnaeus, 13.182-208
  4. ^ Virgil, Aeneid 1.120
  5. ^ Virgil, Aeneid 1.521

References

  • Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. ISBN 978-0674995796. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. ISBN 978-0198145318. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses translated by Brookes More (1859-1942). Boston, Cornhill Publishing Co. 1922. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses. Hugo Magnus. Gotha (Germany). Friedr. Andr. Perthes. 1892. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Quintus Smyrnaeus, The Fall of Troy translated by Way. A. S. Loeb Classical Library Volume 19. London: William Heinemann, 1913. Online version at theio.com
  • Quintus Smyrnaeus, The Fall of Troy. Arthur S. Way. London: William Heinemann; New York: G.P. Putnam's Sons. 1913. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Publius Vergilius Maro, Aeneid. Theodore C. Williams. trans. Boston. Houghton Mifflin Co. 1910. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Publius Vergilius Maro, Bucolics, Aeneid, and Georgics. J. B. Greenough. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1900. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library.


This article includes a list of Greek mythological figures with the same or similar names. If an internal link for a specific Greek mythology article referred you to this page, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended Greek mythology article, if one exists.