Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal

Summary

Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal
Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal.png
Obverse and reverse of the medal
TypeCampaign medal
Awarded forService in Iraq or Syria after 15 June 2014
Presented bythe U.S. Department of Defense
Eligibility15 June 2014 – present
StatusActive
Established30 March 2016 (2016-03-30)
First awardedApril 2016[1] (retroactive to 15 June 2014)
Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal ribbon.svg

Inherent Resolve Campaign streamer.svg

Inherent Resolve Campaign streamer (USMC).svg
Service ribbon (top)
Campaign streamer (middle)
USMC campaign streamer (bottom)[2][3][4][5]
Precedence
Next (higher)Iraq Campaign Medal[6][7]
Next (lower)Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal[6][7]

The Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal is a United States Department of Defense service award and campaign medal. The medal was established by Executive Order on 30 March 2016 by U.S. President Barack Obama.[8] The medal may be awarded to members of the U.S. Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and Coast Guard, for service in Iraq, Syria, or contiguous waters or airspace retroactively from 15 June 2014 to a date yet to be determined. Service members who were awarded the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal for service that is now covered by the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal may make application to be awarded the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal in lieu of the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal. No service member will be entitled to the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal and Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal for the same action, time period, or service.

Symbolism

According to the United States Army Institute of Heraldry's website, the medal's mailed fist and dagger represent "strength and courage in the defense of liberty and freedom". The scorpion being impaled was chosen because, "The scorpion, symbolic for treachery and destruction, is found on most major land masses."[9]

The center of the ribbon is orange in color, surrounded by tan and blue, deriving its hues from the Ishtar Gate and the color of Southwestern Eurasian topography,[10] which is primarily sand.[11]

Criteria

To qualify for the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal, personnel must have been attached to a unit based in Iraq or Syria, fly missions over those countries, and/or serve in contiguous waters for 30 days consecutive, or non-consecutive. Service members who were killed or were medically evacuated from those countries due to wounds or injuries immediately qualify for the award, as do members who engaged in combat.[12] Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force personnel qualify for the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal after only 30 qualifying days consecutive or non-consecutive.[13]

Eligible personnel will be awarded one medal with campaign star upon meeting the initial criteria for the award. Service in subsequent campaign phases qualifies personnel for additional campaign stars.[13]

Campaign phases and devices

The following are the approved campaign phases and respective inclusive dates for the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal:[14][15][16][17][18]

Phase From To
Abeyance 15 June 2014 24 November 2015
Intensification 25 November 2015 14 April 2017
Defeat 15 April 2017 1 July 2020
Normalize 2 July 2020 TBD

Examples of campaign stars worn on the Inherent Resolve Campaign service ribbon:

Bronze star
Any one of the four phases
Bronze star
Bronze star
Two of the four phases
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Three of the four phases
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
All four phases

The following ribbon devices are authorized for wear on the Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal:

References

  1. ^ Howze, Ray (19 April 2016). "2 101st soldiers first to be awarded medal". The Leaf-Chronicle. Retrieved 30 May 2016.
  2. ^ "AWARDS UPDATE > The Official United States Marine Corps Public Website > Marines.mil - MARADMINS". www.marines.mil.
  3. ^ "AWARDS UPDATE > The Official United States Marine Corps Public Website > Messages Display". www.marines.mil.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 February 2018. Retrieved 10 March 2018.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ [1][dead link]
  6. ^ a b United States Army Institute of Heraldry (2016). "Ribbons--Order Of Precedence". The Institute of Heraldry. United States of America: United States Department of the Army. Archived from the original on 13 April 2016. Retrieved 13 April 2016.
  7. ^ a b United States Navy Personnel Command (2016). "Navy Awards Precedence Chart". United States Navy. United States of America: United States Department of the Navy. Archived from the original on 22 April 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  8. ^ Obama, Barack Hussein, II (30 March 2016). "Executive Order Establishing Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal". Office of the Press Secretary. Washington, D.C.: Executive Office of the President of the United States of America. Archived from the original on 25 January 2017. Retrieved 13 April 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  9. ^ "The New Anti-ISIS Medal: A Bit Too Crusadery?". The Atlantic. March 2016.
  10. ^ United States Army Institute of Heraldry (2016). "Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal". Campaign and Service Medals. United States of America: United States Department of the Army. Archived from the original on 13 April 2016. Retrieved 13 April 2016.
  11. ^ Gilkes, Paul (8 April 2016). "Inherent Resolve Campaign medal available to military service personnel". Coin World. p. 2. Archived from the original on 13 April 2016. Retrieved 13 April 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  12. ^ Garamone, Jim (30 March 2016). "Carter Announces Operation Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal". DoD News. Washington, D.C.: Defense Media Activity. Archived from the original on 13 April 2016. Retrieved 13 April 2016.CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  13. ^ a b c Office of the Secretary of the Navy (September 2017). "CHANGE TO INHERENT RESOLVE CAMPAIGN MEDAL CRITERIA". Washington, D.C. Archived from the original on 17 June 2019. (2) Fleet Marine Force Combat Operations Insignia. A miniature bronze Marine Corps emblem is authorized by the Secretary of the Navy for U.S. Navy Service Members assigned to Marine Corps units that participate in combat during the assignment. Worn in accordance with article 123 of reference (e).
  14. ^ "Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal - Approved Campaign Phases" (PDF). PRHome.Defense.gov. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  15. ^ "Department of Defense Personnel and Readiness Awards Page -- Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal Approved Campaign Phases". Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  16. ^ "Coast Guard Military Medals and Awards Manual, COMDTINST M1650.25E" (PDF). United States Coast Guard. 15 August 2016. p. 5-17. Retrieved 22 September 2016.
  17. ^ . 19 October 2018 https://web.archive.org/web/20181019092420/https://www.hrc.army.mil/asset/16948. Archived from the original on 19 October 2018. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  18. ^ "The Office of The Under Secretary for Personnel and Readiness -- Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal Approved Campaign Phases" (PDF). Retrieved 16 February 2021.

Further reading

  • Tice, Jim (29 May 2016). "Award rules set for Inherent Resolve Campaign Medal". Army Times. Retrieved 30 May 2016.

External links

  • Official website