Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer
 "E" train​​"J" train"Z" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Jamaica Center-Parsons Archer.jpg
Upper level platform
Station statistics
AddressParsons Boulevard & Archer Avenue
Queens, NY 11433
BoroughQueens
LocaleJamaica
Coordinates40°42′09″N 73°48′00″W / 40.702407°N 73.799973°W / 40.702407; -73.799973Coordinates: 40°42′09″N 73°48′00″W / 40.702407°N 73.799973°W / 40.702407; -73.799973
DivisionB (BMT/IND)
LineBMT Archer Avenue Line (lower level)
IND Archer Avenue Line (upper level)
Services      E all times (all times)​
      J all times (all times)
      Z rush hours, peak direction (rush hours, peak direction)
Transit connectionsBus transport NYCT Bus: Q4, Q5, Q20A, Q20B, Q24, Q30, Q31, Q42, Q44 SBS, Q54, Q83, Q84, Q85
Bus transport MTA Bus: Q6, Q8, Q9, Q25, Q34, Q41, Q65, Q110, Q111, Q112, Q113, Q114
Bus transport NICE Bus: n4
(all at Jamaica Center Bus Terminal)
StructureUnderground
Levels2
Platforms2 island platforms (1 on each level)
Tracks4 (2 on each level)
Other information
OpenedDecember 11, 1988; 30 years ago (1988-12-11)
Station code278[1]
AccessibleThis station is compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 ADA-accessible
Wireless serviceWi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[2][3]
Former/other namesJamaica Center–Parsons Boulevard (1988-circa 2004)
Traffic
Passengers (2018)10,681,269[4]Decrease 8%
Rank27 out of 424
Station succession


Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 north(Terminal): E all times​ ​J all timesZ rush hours, peak direction
Next adjacent station compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 southSutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue–JFK Airport: E all times​ ​J all timesZ rush hours, peak direction

Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer (formerly Jamaica Center–Parsons Boulevard) is the northern terminal station of the IND and BMT Archer Avenue Lines of the New York City Subway, located at Parsons Boulevard and Archer Avenue in Jamaica, Queens. This station opened on December 11, 1988 and is served by the E and J train at all times, as well as the Z train during rush hours in the peak direction.

The station is a major transfer point for buses from eastern Queens, and replaces the old 160th Street and 168th Street stations of the BMT Jamaica Line; the Jamaica Center station is located near the site of the former. It is also located close to the site of the Long Island Rail Road's now-demolished Union Hall Street station.

History

The station's design started on December 7, 1973 and was completed on June 17, 1981 in-house. Bids on the station construction were received on September 21, 1981, and was awarded to A. J. Pegno Construction Corporation for $22,425,415. Work on the station commenced on October 12, 1981.[5]:13

On December 14, 1991, a display titled "Astoria–Dreams of New York," a 32 feet (9.8 m)-long mural, consisting of seven portraits of first-generation Greek immigrants was removed from the station for not including any pictures of African Americans, seven days after going up.[6] The artist, Eugenia Marketou, called the decision "censorship of the worst kind." The piece was removed at the request of the directors of the Arts for Transit program after negative public reaction, which included their defacement with graffiti and protest stickers. A dozen African American riders had complained to the agency. On the same date, a $70,000 sculpture called "Jamaica Center Stations Riders, Blue," which was created by well-known African American artist Sam Gilliam, was unveiled at the station. The sculpture was funded through the MTA Arts for Transit program, which allocates 1 percent of capital construction costs for art projects.[7][8] After negotiations between Marketou and his agency took place, it was reinstalled on February 6, 1992 with a banner stating "Portraits of the Greek Immigrant Community" added in addition to the tile. In addition, Marketou agreed to appear in front of it during three rush hours to explain it. One of the photographs was removed in the following two weeks. The exhibit was only scheduled to stay until May 6, 1992.[9]

Station layout

G Street level Exit/entrance
B1 Mezzanine Fare control, station agents, MetroCard machines
Handicapped/disabled access Elevator on south side of Archer Avenue at Parsons Boulevard
B2
Upper level
Southbound "E" train toward World Trade Center (Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue–JFK Airport)
Island platform, doors will open on the left or right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound "E" train toward World Trade Center (Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue–JFK Airport)
B3
Lower level
Southbound "J" train ("Z" train AM rush) toward Broad Street (Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue–JFK Airport)
Island platform, doors will open on the left or right Handicapped/disabled access
Southbound "J" train ("Z" train AM rush) toward Broad Street (Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue–JFK Airport)
The Jamaica Center Bus Terminal can be found at some of the exits.

This is a two-level station with E trains serving the upper level (IND) at all times, and the J and Z trains serving the lower level (BMT), the former of which operates all times and the latter of which operates during rush hours in the peak direction. Each level has two tracks and one island platform. Both platforms are 600 feet (183 m) in length, standard for a full-length B Division train; however, since BMT Eastern Division trains are only 480 feet (146 m) long, there are fences at both of the unused ends of the lower-level platforms to prevent passengers from falling onto the tracks.

This station has tan brick walls and red brick floor on both levels; the ceilings are suspended[5]:13 and have metal slats and resembles a vaulted ceiling, except there are no curves.

This station has ten escalators and two elevators.[5]:13

Exits

Track layout
Legend
Upper level
Lower level

There are two entrances to this station.

  • Handicapped/disabled access Exit 1: The first one is at the very east end of the platforms. It contains a mezzanine that has four escalators, two to each platform, and an ADA-accessible elevator serving both platforms. There is a large, single bank of turnstiles leading to fare control. One wide staircase and one escalator leads to a pavilion behind the streets at the northeast corner of Parsons Boulevard and Archer Avenue. A narrower staircase and escalator leads to the southeast corner. An elevator is present as well. This entrance contains a 1991 artwork called Jamaica Center Station Riders by Sam Gilliam made up of blue painted aluminum.[10]
  • Exit 2: The second exit is near the middle of the platforms. Each platform contains two escalators to the mezzanine. The upper level also has one staircase to the mezzanine while the lower level has two. In this mezzanine there is more overlap of walls between fare control and the portion of the mezzanine for the station exits. In addition to the part-time bank of standard turnstiles, there are HEET turnstiles to provide access during off-peak hours. This entrance has three street stairs. Two of them, one of which also has an up-only escalator, lead up to the south side of Archer Avenue outside the bus boarding area. The staircase with the escalator has a brickwork design surrounding it while the other staircase at this entrance has an ultra-wide green metal fence. There is another staircase, the narrowest in the entire station at the northeast corner of Archer Avenue and 153rd Street.[10]

Infrastructure

West of the station, both levels feature diamond crossovers. The upper level's crossover is just west of the platform, while the lower level's is halfway between this station and Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue.[11]

The tracks on both levels extend past the station for possible future extensions, but are currently used for storage.[12][13] On the lower level, they continue one train length of about 480 feet (150 m) and end at bumper blocks at 160th Street;[13][14] they were originally planned to extend as far as Merrick Boulevard.[14] This was a planned extension toward 190th Street–Hollis Avenue (near the Hollis LIRR station). Where the lower level tracks end, there is a provision for a diamond crossover switch at the end of the tunnel (under 160th Street).[15][14] On the upper level, the tracks extend around 2,000 feet (610 m) or just over 3 train lengths of about 600 feet (180 m), curving south under the LIRR Atlantic Branch 60 feet (18 m) below ground. They then run under 160th Street within the York College campus and end at bumper blocks near Tuskegee Airmen Way (formerly South Road).[12][13][14][16][17] This was the site of the line's original groundbreaking in 1973.[15] The plan was for this line to use the LIRR Locust Manor Branch (Atlantic) ROW and run to Springfield Boulevard or Rosedale LIRR station.[17][15][14] Where the upper level tracks stub end, there is a provision for a portal to go outside if the line going to Southeastern Queens is ever built.[15][14] The tunnel was originally planned to curve west towards the Atlantic ROW just north of Liberty Avenue, running underneath the York College Athletic Field.[14]

East of the upper level platform, a Central Instrument Room (753CIR) is located deep in the tunnel on track D2A (upper level) bench wall.

East of the station, next to the D1A tail track on the upper level, the tunnel catwalk structure widens, and the track curves south along with the D2A track. Where the catwalk structure ends, there is a stairway to the lower level tail tracks.

Jamaica Center Bus Terminal

The subway complex includes the Jamaica Center Bus Terminal, a series of bus stops located along Archer Avenue (primarily along the south side of the street next to the LIRR right of way). The bus stop areas are lettered A through H. The western portion of the terminal (bays F through H and the bus layover area) is also known as the "Teardrop Canopy".[18] It serves as a major transit hub within Jamaica.[10] The former 160th Street Jamaica Elevated station on Jamaica Avenue that it replaced was also a major hub for trolley service when it was originally built.[19][20] Several of the trolley lines were the predecessors to current bus service.[19][20]

Route Western terminal
(if not the Jamaica Center Bus Terminal)
Eastern terminal via Notes
MTA Bus
165th Street Bus Terminal JFK International Airport Jamaica Avenue, Sutphin Boulevard,
Rockaway Boulevard, North Boundary Road
165th Street Bus Terminal JFK International Airport Jamaica Avenue, Sutphin Boulevard,
Rockaway Boulevard, North Boundary Road
Limited bus route to JFK Airport
165th Street Bus Terminal Spring Creek Jamaica Avenue, 101st Avenue, Fountain Avenue
165th Street Bus Terminal South Ozone Park Jamaica Avenue, Supthin Boulevard, Liberty Avenue,
135th Street (Northbound), Van Wyck Expressway

Service Road (Southbound), Lincoln Street

Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue
– JFK Airport Subway station
College Point Parsons Boulevard, Kissena Boulevard, 127th Street
Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue
– JFK Airport Subway station
College Point Parsons Boulevard, Kissena Boulevard, 127th Street Limited route to College Point
Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue
– JFK Airport Subway station
Whitestone Parsons Boulevard, Kissena Boulevard, Union Street
165th Street Bus Terminal Howard Beach 127th Street, 109th Avenue, Cross Bay Boulevard
Sutphin Boulevard–Archer Avenue
– JFK Airport Subway station
College Point 164th Street, 45th Avenue, College Point Boulevard Originally the NY&QC Flushing-Jamaica and College Point trolley lines
Parsons Boulevard Subway station or
Jamaica–179th Street Subway station
Belmont Park Jamaica Avenue, Hempstead Avenue
Parsons Boulevard Subway station Rosedale or Cedarhurst All trips: Guy R. Brewer Boulevard, 147th Avenue,
Cedarhurst trips: Rosedale Road, Peninsula Boulevard
Originally Queens portion of the LIER Far Rockaway Line
Parsons Boulevard Subway station Ozone Park South Road, Liberty Avenue
Parsons Boulevard Subway station Far Rockaway Guy R. Brewer Boulevard, Rockaway Boulevard,
Nassau Expressway
  • Originally the LIER Far Rockaway Line
  • Evenings and overnights, Q114 buses operate local; no Q113 service operates at this time.
Guy R. Brewer Boulevard, 147th Avenue, Rockaway Turnpike
NYCT Bus
to Cambria Heights
Merrick Boulevard, Linden Boulevard
to Cambria Heights
Merrick Boulevard, Linden Boulevard Limited bus route to Cambria Heights
to Rosedale or Green Acres Mall, Valley Stream
All trips: Merrick Boulevard, Hook Creek Boulevard
Green Acres trips: Sunrise Highway
to Rosedale
Merrick Boulevard, Hook Creek Boulevard Limited bus route to Rosedale
Merrick Boulevard and Archer Avenue College Point
  • All trips: Archer Avenue, Main Street, Union Street
  • Q20A: 20th Avenue
  • Q20B: 14th Avenue
168th Street and Archer Avenue Bushwick Jamaica/Archer Avenues, Atlantic Avenue, Broadway (Brooklyn)
to Little Neck or Bayside
All trips: Homelawn Street, Utopia Parkway, Horace Harding Expressway
Bayside trips: Springfield Boulevard
to Bayside
Jamaica/Archer Avenues, Homelawn Street, Utopia Parkway,
47th/48th Avenues, Bell Boulevard, Francis Lewis Boulevard
to Addisleigh Park
Liberty Avenue, 174th Street, Sayres Avenue
Merrick Boulevard and Archer Avenue West Farms Archer Avenue, Main Street, Union Street, Parsons Boulevard,
Whitestone Expressway, Cross Bronx Expressway
Travels via the Whitestone Bridge between Queens and the Bronx
170th Street & Jamaica Avenue Williamsburg Bridge Plaza Bus Terminal Jamaica Avenue, Metropolitan Avenue, Grand Street Successors to BMT streetcar service
Broadway Junction Jamaica Avenue
Parsons Boulevard Subway station Cambria Heights or Saint Albans Liberty Avenue, Murdock Avenue
to Laurelton
Merrick Boulevard, 120th Avenue
to Rosedale or Green Acres Mall, Valley Stream
All trips: Merrick Boulevard, Bedell Street, Conduit Avenue
Rosedale trips: 243rd Street
Green Acres trips: Green Acres Road
Part of the former NY&LIT Brooklyn-Freeport Line
NICE Bus
to Freeport
Merrick Road, Merrick Boulevard Part of the former NY&LIT Brooklyn-Freeport Line
to Freeport
Merrick Road, Merrick Boulevard Express to Freeport Station

References

  1. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  2. ^ "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved May 18, 2016.
  3. ^ More Subway Stations in Manhattan, Bronx in Line to Get Online, mta.info (March 25, 2015). "The first two phases included stations in Midtown Manhattan and all underground stations in Queens with the exception of the 7 Main St terminal."
  4. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2013–2018". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 18, 2019. Retrieved July 18, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c "Archer Avenue Extension Ceremony 1988". New York City Transit Authority. December 1988. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  6. ^ Finder, Alan (February 7, 1992). "Settling a Subway Art Disput, Artfully: Photos Are Reinstalled but Artist Must Explain Her Work to Critics". The New York Times.
  7. ^ Leahy, Jack (December 15, 1991). "Am I blue? Just ask IND's new sculpture". New York Daily News.
  8. ^ Cox, Robert B. (December 20, 1991). "Art Exhibit Goes Off the Wall". Newsday.
  9. ^ "Subway Exhibit Reinstalled". Newsday. February 18, 1992.
  10. ^ a b c "MTA Neighborhood Maps: Jamaica" (PDF). mta.info. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. 2015. Retrieved June 30, 2015.
  11. ^ "www.nycsubway.org: New York City Subway Track Maps". www.nycsubway.org. October 9, 2015. Retrieved October 9, 2015.
  12. ^ a b Raskin, Joseph B. (2013). The Routes Not Taken: A Trip Through New York City's Unbuilt Subway System. New York, New York: Fordham University Press. ISBN 978-0-82325-369-2.
  13. ^ a b c Queens Subway Options Study, New York: Environmental Impact Statement. United States Department of Transportation, Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Urban Mass Transit Administration. May 1984. pp. 83–. Retrieved July 10, 2016.
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Archer Ave Route (proposed) Construction, Queens: Environmental Impact Statement. Urban Mass Transit Administration, United States Department of Transportation. August 1973. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  15. ^ a b c d Burks, Edward C. (October 24, 1973). "Work Begun on Queens Subway Extension" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved September 26, 2015.
  16. ^ Burks, Edward C. (March 9, 1975). "Building Progresses On Subway In Jamaica" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  17. ^ a b Burks, Edward C. (September 24, 1976). "Coming: Light at End of 63d St. Tunnel" (PDF). The New York Times. Retrieved September 27, 2015.
  18. ^ "Jamaica Bus Improvement Study" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Transportation. May 17, 2011. Retrieved April 10, 2016.
  19. ^ a b Seyfried, Vincent F. (1961). "Full text of "Story of the Long Island Electric Railway and the Jamaica Central Railways, 1894-1933 /"". archive.org. F. E. Reifschneider. Retrieved December 20, 2015.
  20. ^ a b Seyfried, Vincent F. (1950). "Full text of "New York and Queens County Railway and the Steinway Lines, 1867-1939."". archive.org. Vincent F. Seyfried. Retrieved December 20, 2015.

External links

  • nycsubway.org – IND Queens Boulevard Line: Jamaica Center/Parsons–Archer
  • Station Reporter — E Train
  • Station Reporter — J Train
  • The Subway Nut — Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer Pictures
  • MTA's Arts For Transit — Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer
  • Parsons Boulevard entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 153rd Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • 158th Street entrance from Google Maps Street View
  • Upper level from Google Maps Street View
  • Lower level from Google Maps Street View