John Trevor Stuart

Summary

(John) Trevor Stuart FRS (born 29 January 1929)[1] is a mathematician and senior research investigator at Imperial College London[3] working in theoretical fluid mechanics, hydrodynamic stability of fluid flows and nonlinear partial differential equations.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10]

Trevor Stuart
Born
John Trevor Stuart

(1929-01-29) 29 January 1929 (age 93)[1][2]
Alma materImperial College London
Known forStuart–Landau equation
Awards
Scientific career
FieldsFluid mechanics
Institutions
ThesisStability of viscous motion for finite disturbances (1952)
Websitewww3.imperial.ac.uk/people/t.stuart

EducationEdit

Stuart was educated Gateway Grammar School, Leicester[1] and Imperial College of Science and Technology, London where he was awarded a Bachelor of Science degree in 1949[1] and a PhD in 1953.[11]

CareerEdit

Stuart joined the Aeronautics Division of the National Research Laboratory, returning to join the staff of Imperial College after a few years. He was appointed professor of theoretical fluid mechanics in 1966 and was head of the Department of Mathematics from 1974 to 1979 and 1983 to 1986. He was Dean of the Royal College of Science from 1990 to 1993. He is currently emeritus professor at Imperial.[12]

ResearchEdit

Stuart is known for his work on nonlinear waves in the onset of turbulence in fluids. He also extended the work of Lord Rayleigh with research into steady streaming in unsteady viscous flows at high Reynolds numbers.[13]

AwardsEdit

Stuart was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1974 and awarded the Otto Laporte Award in 1985 and the Senior Whitehead Prize in 1984. He also holds honorary Doctor of Science degrees from Brown University and the University of East Anglia. He is current editor of the Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society.[14][15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "STUART, Prof. (John) Trevor". Who's Who. ukwhoswho.com. Vol. 2013 (online Oxford University Press ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. (Subscription or UK public library membership required.) (subscription required)
  2. ^ Gay, Hannah (2007). The History of Imperial College London, 1907–2007.
  3. ^ "John Trevor Stuart's homepage at Imperial College London". Archived from the original on 22 February 2012.
  4. ^ Stuart, J. T. (1996). "Evolution of vorticity in perturbed flow in a pipe". Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science. 13 (3): 206–210. doi:10.1016/S0894-1777(96)00081-7.
  5. ^ Stuart, J. T. (1998). "Singularities in Three-Dimensional Compressible Euler Flows with Vorticity". Theoretical and Computational Fluid Dynamics. 10 (1–4): 385–391. Bibcode:1998ThCFD..10..385S. doi:10.1007/s001620050071. S2CID 121123133.
  6. ^ Stuart, J. T. (1997). "The quarterly journal of mechanics and applied mathematics 1947–1997". The Quarterly Journal of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics. 50 (4): 497–498. doi:10.1093/qjmam/50.4.497.
  7. ^ Dhanak, M. R.; Stuart, J. T. (1995). "Distortion of the Stagnation-Point Flow Due to Cross-Stream Vorticity in the External Flow". Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 352 (1700): 443. Bibcode:1995RSPTA.352..443D. doi:10.1098/rsta.1995.0081. S2CID 120001341.
  8. ^ Stuart, J. T. (1986). "Taylor-Vortex Flow: A Dynamical System". SIAM Review. 28 (3): 315–342. Bibcode:1986SIAMR..28...10S. doi:10.1137/1028104.
  9. ^ Stuart, J. T.; Diprima, R. C. (1978). "The Eckhaus and Benjamin-Feir Resonance Mechanisms". Proceedings of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences. 362 (1708): 27. Bibcode:1978RSPSA.362...27S. doi:10.1098/rspa.1978.0118. S2CID 119822941.
  10. ^ Eagles, P. M.; Stuart, J. T.; Diprima, R. C. (2006). "The effects of eccentricity on torque and load in Taylor-vortex flow". Journal of Fluid Mechanics. 87 (2): 209. doi:10.1017/S002211207800155X.
  11. ^ Stuart, John Trevor (1953). Stability of viscous motion for finite disturbances (PhD thesis). Imperial College London.(subscription required)
  12. ^ "Imperial College Fellowship Awards". Imperial College. Retrieved 2 March 2012.
  13. ^ "Trevor Stuart". London: Royal Society. One or more of the preceding sentences may incorporate text from the royalsociety.org website where "all text published under the heading 'Biography' on fellow profile pages is available under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License." "Royal Society Terms, conditions and policies". Archived from the original on 20 February 2016. Retrieved 9 March 2016.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  14. ^ Stuart, T. (2012). "Editorial". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society. 58: 1–2. doi:10.1098/rsbm.2012.0040.
  15. ^ Stuart, J. T. (2013). "Derek William Moore. 19 April 1931 -- 15 July 2008". Biographical Memoirs of Fellows of the Royal Society. 59: 241–259. doi:10.1098/rsbm.2013.0014.