KITSAT-1

Summary

KITSAT-1
Kitsat-1 Satellite Artist's Concept.png
Artist rendering of KITSAT-1 satellite
NamesKITSAT-A
Korea Institute of
Technology Satellite-1
Uribyol-1
KITSAT-OSCAR-23
KO-23
Our Star
Mission typeTechnology demonstration
OperatorSaTReC
COSPAR ID1992-052B
SATCAT no.22077
WebsiteKAIST SaTReC
Mission duration5 years (planned)
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftKITSAT-1
BusSSTL-70
ManufacturerSurrey Satellite Technology (SSTL)
Launch mass48.6 kg (107 lb)
Dimensions35.2 cm × 35.6 cm × 67 cm (13.9 in × 14.0 in × 26.4 in)
Power30 watts
Start of mission
Launch date10 August 1992, 23:08:07 UTC
RocketAriane 42P H-10
Launch siteCentre Spatial Guyanais, ELA-2
ContractorArianespace
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit[1]
RegimeLow Earth orbit
Perigee altitude1,316 km (818 mi)
Apogee altitude1,328 km (825 mi)
Inclination66.00°
Period112.0 minutes
Instruments
Digital Store and Forward Communication Experiment (DSFCE)
CCD Earth Imaging System (CEIS)
Digital Signal Processing Experiment (DSPE)
Cosmic Ray Experiment (CRE)
 

KITSAT-1 or KITSAT-A (Korean Institute of Technology Satellite) [2] is the first satellite to be launched for the South Korea. Once launched, the satellite was given the nickname "Our Star" (우리별). The KITSAT-1 is a low Earth orbit (LEO) satellite with a modular structure. Of the 12 satellites launched by South Korea, KITSAT-1 has the highest altitude.[3] While the KITSAT-1 maintains equilibrium by gravity gradient forces, magnetic torque can be used to control attitude if needed.[4] The forecasted lifespan of the KITSAT-1 was only five years, but communication with the satellite was maintained for 12 years.[3] Since the launch of the KITSAT-1, South Korea has launched an additional 36 satellites.[2]

Size

The KITSAT-1 is considered to be a small-sized or microsatellite.[5] The KITSAT-1 is the smallest sized low Earth orbit satellite that has been launched by South Korea.[3]

On-Board Computer System

The KITSAT-1's On-board computer (OBC) system uses an OBC186 for the main OBC and an OBC80 as the backup On-board computer system.[6]

Instruments

It carried a Digital Store and Forward Communication Experiment (DSFCE), a CCD Earth Imaging System (CEIS), a Digital Signal Processing Experiment (DSPE), a Cosmic Ray Experiment (CRE).[7]

CCD Earth Imaging System

The CCD Earth Imaging System is equipped with two different cameras. These cameras are: a wide-angle camera with 4 km/pixel and a high-resolution camera with 400 m/pixel.[8] The two CCD cameras that are equipped on the KITSAT-1 are located on the bottom of the satellite so that the cameras should always be pointed toward Earth[9]

Cosmic Ray Experiment

The CRE's main purpose aboard the KITSAT-1 was to monitor and study the space radiation at 1,320 km (820 mi) orbit of the Earth. These space radiation measurements were to be taken in short-term and long-term time frames. The CRE is equipped to measure the high energy protons, the Galactic Cosmic Rays from deep space, and also the Solar Cosmic Rays from solar flares.[10]

The CRE payload consists of two subsystems. The two subsystems are the Cosmic Particle Experiment (CPE) and the Total Dose Experiment (TDE). The CPE is used to measure the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) spectrum over short-term time frames and the TDE is used to measure the total accumulated ionizing radiation dose over long-term time frames.[11]

Launch

Launched in 1992, KITSAT-1, which stands for the Korea Institute of Technology Satellite-1, is the first satellite developed by SaTReC. Developed through a collaborative program between SaTReC and the University of Surrey, United Kingdom, the main objective of the KITSAT-1 program was to acquire satellite technology through the training and education of satellite engineers.[12]

The orbit of the KITSAT-1 is of 1320 km with 66° of the orbital inclination. This orbit lies just within the inner Van Allen radiation belt.[13]

The success of the KITSAT-1 program marked the beginning of space technology development for South Korea.[14]

Placed into orbit on 10 August 1992, and launched from Centre Spatial Guyanais (CSG), its launch weight was 48.6 kg, and it measured 35.2 cm x 35.6 cm x 67 cm. The console of the University of Surrey UoSAT-5 satellite was used.

KITSAT-1 was launched on an Ariane 42P H-10 launch vehicle along with NASA's TOPEX/Poseidon satellite and France's S80/T satellite.

South Korea became the 22nd country to operate a satellite.

The Ariane 4 launch vehicle, with TOPEX/Poseidon, KITSAT-1, and S/80T on board.

See also

References

  1. ^ "STSat 2C 2013-003A NORAD 39068". N2YO.com. Retrieved 31 October 2013.
  2. ^ a b An, Hyoung Joon (April 2020). "South Korea's space program: Activities and ambitions. Asia Policy 27(2)". Retrieved 29 April 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Choi J., Jo J.H., Choi E.J., Yu J., Choi B.K., Kim M.J., Yim H.S., Roh D.G., Kim S., Park J.H., & Cho S. "Space surveillance radar observation analysis: One-year tracking and orbit determination results of KITSAT-1, "우리별 1호", Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 37(2), 105-115" Check |url= value (help). Retrieved 28 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  4. ^ Min, K. W., Kim, S. H., Shin, Y. H., & Choi, Y. W. (December 1993). "KITSAT-1 cosmic ray experiment initial results. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 10(2), 103-112" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  5. ^ Kim H.S., Lee H.K., & Choi S.D. (May 1996). "On-board computer system for kitsat-1 and 2.Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 13(2), 41-51" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  6. ^ Kim H.S., Lee H.K., & Choi S.D. (May 1996). "On-board computer system for kitsat-1 and 2. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 13(2), 41-51" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  7. ^ "Display: KITSAT-A 1992-052B". NASA. 10 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  8. ^ Min, K. W., Kim, S. H., Shin, Y. H., & Choi, Y. W. (December 1993). "KITSAT-1 cosmic ray experiment initial results. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 10(2), 103-112" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  9. ^ Park S., Bae J., Sung D.K., & Choi S.D. (May 1996). "Development of the thermal model for kitsat-1/2 microsatellites and its verification using in-orbit telemetries. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 13(2), 105-116" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  10. ^ Min, K. W., Kim, S. H., Shin, Y. H., & Choi, Y. W. (December 1993). "KITSAT-1 cosmic ray experiment initial results. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 10(2), 103-112" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  11. ^ Min, K. W., Kim, S. H., Shin, Y. H., & Choi, Y. W. (December 1993). "KITSAT-1 cosmic ray experiment initial results. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 10(2), 103-112" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  12. ^ "KITSAT-1 mission page from SSTL". SSTL. Archived from the original on 27 December 2016. Retrieved 26 December 2016.
  13. ^ Min, K. W., Kim, S. H., Shin, Y. H., & Choi, Y. W. (December 1993). "KITSAT-1 cosmic ray experiment initial results. Journal of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 10(2), 103-112" (PDF). Retrieved 29 April 2021.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  14. ^ "KAIST Satellite Technology Research Center (SaTRec)". KAIST SaTRec. Retrieved 2 March 2021.