KITSAT-2

Summary

KITSAT-2
NamesKITSAT-B
Uribyol-2
KITSAT-OSCAR 25
KO-25
Mission typeTechnology demonstration
OperatorSaTReC
COSPAR ID1993-061F
SATCAT no.22828
Websitehttp://satrec.kaist.ac.kr/e_02_02.php
Spacecraft properties
SpacecraftKITSAT
BusKITSAT-1
ManufacturerSaTReC
Launch mass47.5 kg (105 lb)
Dimensions35.2 cm x 35.6 cm x 67 cm
Power30 watts
Start of mission
Launch date26 September 1993,
01:47 UTC
RocketAriane-40 H10
Launch siteCentre Spatial Guyanais, ELA-2
ContractorArianespace
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit[1]
RegimeSun-synchronous orbit
Perigee altitude800.0 km (497.1 mi)
Apogee altitude823.0 km (511.4 mi)
Inclination98.60°
Period100.90 minutes
Instruments
CCD Earth Imaging System (CEIS)
Next Generation Small Satellite Computer
High Speed Modulation Experiment Device
Digital Store and Forward Communication Experiment (DSFCE)
Low Energy Electron Detector (LEED)
 

KITSAT-2 (a.k.a. "Uribyol 2", "KITSAT-OSCAR 25", "KO-25" and "KITSAT-B") was a South Korean experimental Earth observation microsatellite. KITSAT-2 was South Korea's second satellite and was the first to be developed and manufactured domestically by the Korea Advanced Institute of Science (KAIST).

Launch

The satellite was launched into orbit on 26 September 1993, at 01:47 UTC, on the 59th flight of the Ariane-40 H10 launch vehicle. The launch took place in the Centre Spatial Guyanais, French Guiana. KITSAT 2 was a South Korean microsatellite that was launched along with SPOT-3. Its mission was very similar to PoSAT-1 (1993-061D).

Mission

The satellite's mission was to improve and enhance the KITSAT-1 systems, use domestically manufactured components, demonstrate experimental modules and to promote domestic space industry.[2][3][4][5][6]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Trajectory: KITSAT-2 1993-061F". NASA. 10 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ "KITSAT series - KITSAT-2". KITSAT Korea Institute of Technology. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  3. ^ "KITSAT-OSCAR 25". om3ktr.sk. Retrieved 9 July 2016.
  4. ^ "KITSAT-2". N2YO.com. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  5. ^ "Display: KITSAT-2 1993-061F". NASA. 10 February 2021. Retrieved 2 March 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ "KITSAT-2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 9 July 2016.