Kathleen Hicks

Summary

Kathleen Hicks
Kathleen H. Hicks.jpg
Official portrait, 2021
35th United States Deputy Secretary of Defense
Assumed office
February 9, 2021
PresidentJoe Biden
SecretaryLloyd Austin
Preceded byDavid Norquist
9th Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
In office
May 24, 2012 – July 2, 2013[1]
PresidentBarack Obama
Preceded byJames Miller[1]
Succeeded byBrian P. McKeon
Personal details
Born
Kathleen Anne Holland[2]

(1970-09-25) September 25, 1970 (age 51)
Fairfield, California, U.S.[2]
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Thomas Hicks
Children3
EducationMount Holyoke College (AB)
University of Maryland, College Park (MPA)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (PhD)

Kathleen Holland Hicks[3] (born September 25, 1970)[2][4] is an American government official who has served as the United States deputy secretary of defense since February 9, 2021,[3] where she will lead the modernization of the country's nuclear triad.[5][6] Hicks is the first Senate-confirmed woman in this role.[7] In 2012, Hicks was the principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy during the Obama administration. By 2020 Hicks was an American academic and national security advisor working as a senior vice president and director of the international security program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.[8] She is the highest ranking woman currently serving in the United States Department of Defense.

Education

Hicks completed an B.A in history and politics at Mount Holyoke College in 1991. She graduated with magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa honors.[9] In 1993, she earned a M.P.A. in national security studies at University of Maryland, College Park.[10] Hicks completed a Ph.D. in political science from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2010.[11] Her dissertation was titled Change Agents: Who Leads and Why in the Execution of US National Security Policy. Charles Stewart III was Hicks' doctoral advisor.[10]

Career

From 1993 to 2006, Hicks was a career civil servant in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, rising from Presidential Management Intern to the Senior Executive Service. She was a senior fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) from 2006 to 2009, leading a variety of national security research projects.[9]

During the Obama administration in 2009, Hicks was appointed deputy undersecretary of defense for strategy, plans and forces in 2009.[12] In 2012, Hicks was the principal deputy under secretary of defense for policy during the Obama administration.[13] In that role, she was a liaison for the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review and oversaw the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance.[14] Hicks was a presidentially appointed commissioner for the National Commission on the Future of the Army. She is a Member of the Council on Foreign Relations and serves on the boards of advisors for the Truman National Security Project and SoldierStrong.[9]

Hicks formerly served as a senior vice president, Henry A. Kissinger Chair, and director of the international security program at CSIS. She concurrently served as the Donald Marron scholar at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.[14] In October 2020, she also served on the CSIS-LSHTM High-Level Panel on Vaccine Confidence and Misinformation amid the COVID-19 pandemic, co-chaired by Heidi Larson and J. Stephen Morrison.[15]

United States Deputy Secretary of Defense

Hicks is sworn in as deputy secretary of defense, February 9, 2021.

On December 30, 2020, Hicks was announced as U.S. president-elect Joe Biden's nominee for United States deputy secretary of defense. She appeared before the Senate Committee on Armed Services on February 2, 2021.[16] She was confirmed by voice vote of the full Senate on February 8, 2021 and sworn into office on February 9, 2021.[17]

Selected works

  • Hicks, Kathleen; Ridge, Eric (2007). Planning for Stability Operations: The Use of Capabilities-based Approaches. Center for Strategic and International Studies. ISBN 978-0-89206-515-8.
  • Hicks, Kathleen H. (2008). Invigorating Defense Department Governance: A Beyond Goldwater-Nichols, Phase 4, Report. Center for Strategic and International Studies. ISBN 978-0-89206-528-8.
  • Hicks, Kathleen H.; Wormuth, Christine E.; Ridge, Eric (2009). The Future of U.S. Civil Affairs Forces. Center for Strategic and International Studies. ISBN 978-0-89206-568-4.
  • Alterman, Jon B.; Hicks, Kathleen H. (2015). Federated Defense in the Middle East. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-4422-5881-5.
  • Hicks, Kathleen H.; Metrick, Andrew; Samp, Lisa Sawyer; Weinberger, Kathleen (August 2, 2016). Undersea Warfare in Northern Europe. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-4422-5968-3.
  • Hicks, Kathleen H.; Samp, Lisa Sawyer (2017). Recalibrating U.S. Strategy toward Russia: A New Time for Choosing. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-4422-8006-9.
  • Hicks, Kathleen H.; Lauter, Louis; McElhinny, Colin (2018). Beyond the Water's Edge: Measuring the Internationalism of Congress. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 978-1-4422-8088-5.

References

  1. ^ a b Department of Defense Key Officials September 1947–December 2020 (PDF). Historical Office, Office of the Secretary of Defense. p. 35. Retrieved January 22, 2021.
  2. ^ a b c "Nominations Before The Senate Armed Services Committee, Second Session, 112th Congress". U.S. Congress. 2013. Retrieved February 4, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "PN79-5 — Kathleen Holland Hicks — Department of Defense". U.S. Congress. Retrieved January 21, 2021.
  4. ^ "Hicks, Kathleen H." Virtual International Authority File. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  5. ^ Paul McCleary (2 Feb 2021) DepSecDef Will Run Most Missile Defense, Nuke Modernization; SecDef Recused
  6. ^ Paul McCleary (24 Feb 2021) New Hicks Memo Sets Acquisition, Force Posture 2022 Budget Priorities Feb. 17 memo.
  7. ^ Seligman, Lara (December 30, 2020). "Kathleen Hicks is Biden's pick to be first female deputy Defense secretary". Politico. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  8. ^ Breaking Defense (19 Feb 2021) WHO’S WHO IN DEFENSE: KATHLEEN HICKS, DEPUTY SECRETARY OF DEFENSE
  9. ^ a b c "Biography: Commission on the National Defense Strategy for the United States" (PDF). Commission on the National Defense Strategy for the United States. Retrieved December 30, 2020.Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  10. ^ a b Hicks, Kathleen H. (2010). Change Agents: Who Leads and Why in the Execution of US National Security Policy (Ph.D. thesis). Massachusetts Institute of Technology. hdl:1721.1/59793. OCLC 671485930.
  11. ^ Zimmerman, Leda (May 4, 2020). "A forum for female voices in international security". MIT News. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  12. ^ Rozen, Laura (April 2, 2009). "Pentagon appointments". Foreign Policy. Retrieved December 31, 2020.
  13. ^ Sullivan, Kate; Lee, MJ (December 30, 2020). "Biden names Kathleen Hicks as first woman deputy defense secretary". CNN. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  14. ^ a b Seck, Hope Hodge (December 30, 2020). "Biden Taps Kathleen Hicks to Be the Pentagon's First Female Deputy SecDef". Military.com. Retrieved December 30, 2020.
  15. ^ Call to Action: CSIS-LSHTM High-Level Panel on Vaccine Confidence and Misinformation, October 19, 2020 Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).
  16. ^ "How Kathleen Hicks will approach nukes, shipbuilding and the budget". DefenseNews. February 2, 2021. Retrieved February 2, 2021.
  17. ^ "DOD Announces New Deputy Secretary of Defense" (Press release). U.S. Department of Defense. February 9, 2021. Retrieved February 9, 2021.

External links

  • Media related to Kathleen H. Hicks at Wikimedia Commons
  • Appearances on C-SPAN Edit this at Wikidata
  • Kathleen Hicks on Twitter Edit this at Wikidata
Political offices
Preceded by
United States Deputy Secretary of Defense
2021–present
Incumbent